Linguistics

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Fairy Ann.

    languagehat.com
    languagehat
    19 Sep 2014 | 4:56 pm
    Back in 2006, we here at LH (always ahead of the curve) discussed the WWI-era Tommyfied French “san fairy Ann” (ça ne fait rien); now Mark Liberman has posted about it at the Log, spurred by David Shariatmadari’s “That eggcorn moment” (“If you’ve been signalled out by friends for saying ‘when all is set and done’, you’re not alone – linguists even have a word for it”). Both Liberman and Shariatmadari quote a wonderful paragraph by Jeanette Winterson about “damp squid”; Liberman goes on to cite this further passage: My father was in Ipres,…
  • Spontaneous mutations in key brain gene are a cause of autism, study concludes

    Language Acquisition News -- ScienceDaily
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:10 am
    Spontaneous mutations in the brain gene TBR1 disrupt the function of the encoded protein in children with severe autism. In addition, there is a direct link between TBR1 and FOXP2, a well-known language-related protein, researchers report.
  • #126 Boletim: Encontro com os Experts na Starbucks

    English Experts
    Alessandro Brandão
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:16 am
    Howdy English Experts readers! Não tivemos boletim na última semana, porém tenho uma justificativa muito boa. Eu estava em São Paulo e lá tive a oportunidade de conhecer pessoalmente a expert Ana Luiza (do Inglês Online). Passamos horas conversando em seu local de trabalho favorito – a Starbucks. Também tive a oportunidade de reencontrar o meu amigo Daniel Bonatti (do LivEnglish). Foi sem dúvida um bate-papo muito agradável. Tivemos alguns insights incríveis para os próximos podcasts. Aguardem que vem coisa bacana por aí. Agora vamos aos melhores tópicos das últimas semanas.
  • Cartoon: The Devolution Genie

    The English Blog
    Jeffrey Hill
    20 Sep 2014 | 11:08 pm
    BACKGROUND The head of the Local Government Association, which represents councils in England and Wales, has said "the devolution genie is out of the bottle" following the Scottish referendum. David Sparks said any new powers that Scotland receives "must be given to local areas in England and Wales", adding: "The appetite for devolution does not stop at the border and the rest of the UK will not be content to settle for the status quo." Read more >> CARTOONThe cartoon by Schrank from The Independent shows UK Prime Minister David Cameron celebrating his…
  • How to Remember What You Hear – A Simple, Research-Based Tip

    Mission to Learn - Lifelong Learning Blog
    Jeff Cobb
    26 Aug 2014 | 6:28 am
    Do you ever get frustrated because you listen to a story, presentation, or lecture, but later – sometimes as little as a few hours later – can recall little to nothing about it? Call it self awareness – or, perhaps more accurately, call it aging – but for whatever reason I have become increasingly conscious of the fact that I forget a tremendous amount of what I hear, even when I am listening with the intent of learning. As a result, I’ve been looking for solid, research-based tips on how to remember what you hear. One approach that seems both highly promising…
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    Language Acquisition News -- ScienceDaily

  • Spontaneous mutations in key brain gene are a cause of autism, study concludes

    18 Sep 2014 | 6:10 am
    Spontaneous mutations in the brain gene TBR1 disrupt the function of the encoded protein in children with severe autism. In addition, there is a direct link between TBR1 and FOXP2, a well-known language-related protein, researchers report.
  • Babies learn words differently as they age, researcher finds

    17 Sep 2014 | 11:14 am
    Researcher has found that toddlers learn words differently as they age, and a limit exists as to how many words they can learn each day. These findings could help parents enhance their children's vocabularies and assist speech-language professionals in developing and refining interventions to help children with language delays.
  • How learning to talk is in the genes

    16 Sep 2014 | 8:22 am
    Researchers have found evidence that genetic factors may contribute to the development of language during infancy. Scientists discovered a significant link between genetic changes near the ROBO2 gene and the number of words spoken by children in the early stages of language development.
  • Neuroscientists identify key role of language gene

    15 Sep 2014 | 12:39 pm
    Neuroscientists have found that a gene mutation that arose more than half a million years ago may be key to humans' unique ability to produce and understand speech.
  • Diverse neighborhoods may help infants' social learning

    10 Sep 2014 | 3:59 pm
    Experiencing diverse communities by hearing different languages at the park, on a bus or in the grocery store may make babies more open-minded in their social learning, a new study finds.
 
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    English Experts

  • #126 Boletim: Encontro com os Experts na Starbucks

    Alessandro Brandão
    19 Sep 2014 | 8:16 am
    Howdy English Experts readers! Não tivemos boletim na última semana, porém tenho uma justificativa muito boa. Eu estava em São Paulo e lá tive a oportunidade de conhecer pessoalmente a expert Ana Luiza (do Inglês Online). Passamos horas conversando em seu local de trabalho favorito – a Starbucks. Também tive a oportunidade de reencontrar o meu amigo Daniel Bonatti (do LivEnglish). Foi sem dúvida um bate-papo muito agradável. Tivemos alguns insights incríveis para os próximos podcasts. Aguardem que vem coisa bacana por aí. Agora vamos aos melhores tópicos das últimas semanas.
  • Expressões dos Seriados: Play fast and loose

    Alessandro Brandão
    16 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    Hi everyone! A expressão de hoje é “Play fast and loose”. Ela significa “fazer algo sem muito capricho, sem muito cuidado”. Confira abaixo os exemplos com áudio. The film is very entertaining even though it plays fast and loose with the historical facts. [ O filme é muito divertido embora trate com descaso os fatos históricos. ] You just can’t play fast and loose with the truth. You’ve got to stick to the facts. [ Não dá para brincar com a verdade. Você tem que se ater aos fatos. ] Ouça o áudio:…
  • Be in a relationship: Outras formas de dizer “Namorar” em inglês

    Donay Mendonça
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    Não é difícil encontrarmos os verbos date e go out sendo utilizados no sentido de namorar em inglês. Tanto a primeira, quanto a segunda opção ocorrem no inglês americano e no britânico. Mas o nosso objetivo aqui não é falar a respeito desses verbos. Hoje vamos mostrar como fazer uso da expressão to be in a relationship, que também pode ser usada como namorar.  Tenho que dizer que considero essa uma opção muito boa para se expressar essa ideia em American English e British English. Vamos agora a alguns exemplos. Confira (check it out) a seguir. Are you in a relationship right…
  • Expressões dos Seriados: Pique one’s interest / curiosity

    Alessandro Brandão
    9 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    Hi everyone! A expressão de hoje é “Pique one’s interest / curiosity”. Ela significa “aumentar o interesse, curiosidade”. Confira abaixo os exemplos com áudio. Advertisements are usually made to pique our interest about a product. [ As propagandas geralmente são feitas para aumentar nosso interesse sobre um produto. ] As a teacher, I always tried to pique my students’ interest. [ Como professor sempre tentei atiçar a curiosidade dos meus alunos. ] Ouça o áudio: http://www.englishexperts.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Pique-interest.mp3 Baixe o mp3 I…
  • Ampliando o Vocabulário: GUY

    Donay Mendonça
    8 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    Não é difícil aprender a definição básica para guy em inglês. A maioria dos dicionários traduzem essa palavra como “homem”, “sujeito”, ou, mais informalmente, “cara”. Podemos dizer, por exemplo, “he is a good guy” (ele é um bom sujeito) ou “John is a bad guy” (John é um cara mau). Em filmes e histórias em geral, “good guy” e “bad guy” são expressões utilizadas respectivamente para designar o “mocinho, herói” (hero) e o “bandido, vilão” (villain). Vamos dar uma olhada nos exemplos de uso. He is the actor who played the good guy. [Ele é o…
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    The English Blog

  • Cartoon: The Devolution Genie

    Jeffrey Hill
    20 Sep 2014 | 11:08 pm
    BACKGROUND The head of the Local Government Association, which represents councils in England and Wales, has said "the devolution genie is out of the bottle" following the Scottish referendum. David Sparks said any new powers that Scotland receives "must be given to local areas in England and Wales", adding: "The appetite for devolution does not stop at the border and the rest of the UK will not be content to settle for the status quo." Read more >> CARTOONThe cartoon by Schrank from The Independent shows UK Prime Minister David Cameron celebrating his…
  • Newsy Video: What 'Devo Max' Means For Scotland

    Jeffrey Hill
    20 Sep 2014 | 10:30 pm
    Scotland's pro-independence campaign lost Thursday's referendum, but England’s northern neighbor gained something else that might prove almost as liberating — it's called devo max. Devo max, or maximum devolution of powers, is how Britain refers to giving a country within the U.K. about as much autonomy as it can possibly have while remaining a part of the U.K. Full transcript >> Related articlesScotland QuizAfter the referendum revolution, local media needs its own devo maxScotlands referendum has spurred a dash for devo but localism is no panacea | Polly ToynbeeNorth should…
  • Words in the News: Pay Rise

    Jeffrey Hill
    20 Sep 2014 | 10:26 pm
    Labour would significantly boost the national minimum wage to more than £8 an hour during the next parliament, giving many of Britain's lowest paid workers an increase of about £60 a week, Ed Miliband has announced. The plan, revealed in an interview with the Observer on the eve of Labour's annual conference in Manchester, would see the minimum wage climb by at least £1.50 an hour from £6.50 an hour (the rate from 1 October this year) by 2020. The substantial rise would throw down the gauntlet to the Conservative party on low pay, as Miliband prepares to fight next May's…
  • Cartoon: The Salmond Hunters

    Jeffrey Hill
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:32 pm
    BACKGROUND Alex Salmond declared he will stand down as Scotland's first minister and the leader of the Scottish National party after failing to secure a majority for independence, as the country's vote to remain in the United Kingdom foreshadowed months of constitutional turmoil. After 55% of Scottish voters rejected independence, a higher margin than suggested by the final opinion polls of the campaign, Salmond, who has dominated Scottish politics for the past decade, said he would quit in November. Read more >> CARTOONThe cartoon by Dave Brown from The Independent is set in…
  • Newsy Video: Sarkozy's Comeback Will Be Challenging, Entertaining

    Jeffrey Hill
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:55 pm
    Il est de retour! Former French President Nicolas Sarkozy, who retired from politics after losing his reelection bid, announced Friday he's making a comeback. In a lengthy Facebook post, Sarkozy announced he will offer France "a new political choice" and seek leadership of his conservative UMP party, currently in opposition to France's Socialist government. Full transcript >> Related articlesSarkozy announces return to politicsNicolas Sarkozy announces return to French politicsSarkozy allies jostle for position ahead of expected comebackCartoon: Sarkozy Meets His WaterlooSarkozy…
 
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    Mission to Learn - Lifelong Learning Blog

  • How to Remember What You Hear – A Simple, Research-Based Tip

    Jeff Cobb
    26 Aug 2014 | 6:28 am
    Do you ever get frustrated because you listen to a story, presentation, or lecture, but later – sometimes as little as a few hours later – can recall little to nothing about it? Call it self awareness – or, perhaps more accurately, call it aging – but for whatever reason I have become increasingly conscious of the fact that I forget a tremendous amount of what I hear, even when I am listening with the intent of learning. As a result, I’ve been looking for solid, research-based tips on how to remember what you hear. One approach that seems both highly promising…
  • New Study: Those Expecting to Teach Learn Better

    Jeff Cobb
    20 Aug 2014 | 6:59 am
    It’s conventional wisdom that “the best way to learn something is to teach it,” but a new study suggests that the mere expectation of teaching may be enough to boost learning significantly. The study (full text here), which was recently published in the journal Memory & Cognition, is based on a set of experiments in which university students were asked to read and recall key ideas and details from two relatively length text passages. Participants in one group of students were told that they would be tested on the passages while participants in a second group were told…
  • Fish Really is Brain Food, New Study Confirms

    Jeff Cobb
    13 Aug 2014 | 7:12 am
    Wondering how to beef up your brain, not only to boost your learning power but also to protect against the risk of age-related brain diseases like Alzheimer’s? Read on for the latest news about the powerful impact regular fish consumption may have. I write often about the relationship between diet and learning on Mission to Learn. If you want to be an effective learner, both day-to-day and over the long haul, you need to consistently eat in a way that supports both your physical and mental health. Among other things, that means making sure there is some good brain food in your diet.
  • The Long Run

    Jeff Cobb
    7 Mar 2014 | 3:41 am
    I’ve been a little heavy on the research-driven posts lately, so I thought I’d throw in a personal story for this post with the hope that other lifelong learners might find some small consolation and – just possibly – inspiration in it. So, here it is: Recently, inspired by watching my son make steady progress in learning to play the piano – and in the the process, learning to read music – I decided to reinvigorate my own efforts at learning the guitar. Specifically, I decided I would really like to be able to read music for the guitar, rather than just…
  • Applying the 6 Key Adult Learning Principles to Yourself

    Jeff Cobb
    24 Feb 2014 | 6:04 am
    It’s been years since Malcolm Knowles, considered by many to be the “father of adult learning,” articulated a set of six principles – or “assumptions,” as he put it – about how adults tend to learn differently from children. While anyone who is serious about creating and facilitating effective adult learning experiences should already be familiar with these principles, I’m willing to bet that the average adult learner, to whom they apply, has never heard of either Knowles or his assumptions. I think it is worth knowing them, though, as a way to…
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    Language Log

  • Why not a simple, straightforward directory?

    Mark Liberman
    21 Sep 2014 | 11:13 am
    From C.M., a sign in the Sidney, Australia, suburb of Waterloo:
  • Form, function, fun

    Mark Liberman
    21 Sep 2014 | 4:14 am
    In "Pragmatics as comedy" (1/28/2010) I discussed a blog post and two comedy sketches that enact familiar rhetorical structures through a series of self-referential descriptions. Thus Chris Clarke's "This is the title of a typical incendiary blog post" (1/24/2010): This sentence contains a provocative statement that attracts the readers’ attention, but really only has very little to do with the topic of the blog post. This sentence claims to follow logically from the first sentence, though the connection is actually rather tenuous. This sentence claims that very few people are willing…
  • Texting while walking

    Victor Mair
    20 Sep 2014 | 12:35 pm
    A few days ago, CNN published an article entitled "Chinese city tests out sidewalk lanes for cellphone users". See also this article on Mashable and this one on MTV news (with some funny videos). The Chinese text on the sidewalk reads: yǔnxǔ shǐyòng shǒujī 允许使用手机 ("use of cell phones is permitted") dàn fēngxiǎn zìfù 但风险自负 ("but it is at your own risk") Similar experiments had earlier been tried in Philadelphia and Washington. Having several times nearly been run over or crashed into by drivers who were texting or talking on their cell phones, I hope that…
  • Wanting that very (no)thing

    Mark Liberman
    20 Sep 2014 | 8:03 am
    Robert Neubecker, "Parents, the Children Will Be Fine. Spend Their Inheritance Now.", NYT 9/19/2014, reports "polling data from both older Americans and their adult children about whether they expected to leave or receive an inheritance": Among the parents, ages 59 to 96, 86.2 percent expected to leave a bequest. But just 44.6 percent of the children, ages 40 to 60, thought they would get one. [...] The message here would seem to be that aging parents are generous to a fault, if a bit manipulative on occasion. Adult children, meanwhile, accept their obligations to care for their parents with…
  • Newsworthy crash blossoms

    Ben Zimmer
    19 Sep 2014 | 9:31 am
    The current BBC home page has some breaking news about Scottish National Party leader Alex Salmond: My first thought on reading this was that it's rather late in the day for Salmond to be going after the No vote, considering No already won handily. Then I realized it's not go after as in "pursue," but rather go + after — he's going (resigning) subsequent to the No vote on the referendum. I had another moment of crash-blossom-inspired confusion on seeing this Politico headline earlier in the week: Why would Politico be saying of DNC chair Debbie Wasserman Schultz that Democrats turn her…
 
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    GoodWord from alphaDictionary.com

  • 9/21/14 - busk

    20 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. To perform in public places for donations from passers-by who stop to listen or watch. 2. (Sailing) To ramble about the seas, weathering storms, looking for easy money.
  • 9/20/14 - anodyne

    19 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. Capable of relieving pain, as aspirin is an anodyne medicine for headaches. 2. Soothing, relaxing, as anodyne living on vacation.
  • 9/19/14 - palimpsest

    18 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. A document written on a sheet or paper or parchment that has been used before, the earlier writing either scraped off though perhaps still partially visible. 2. Anything with more than one layer or aspect beneath its surface, anything multilayered.
  • 9/18/14 - abate

    17 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. (without object) To lessen, diminish, grow less intense, or widespread, as in the storm abated. 2. (with an object) To reduce, cause to become less, as in abate an odor with a deodorant. 3. To end, to cease or cause to cease, as in the judge abated the proceedings.
  • 9/17/14 - handicap

    16 Sep 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. An advantage given to a weaker participant in a sport or game to make play fairer, such as extra shots in golf given to less experienced players, or weight added to the saddle of a lighter rider in horse-racing. 2. Any disadvantage that hinders the expected outcome. 3. (Offensive) A physical, social, or mental disability.
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    Fritinancy

  • Lets Pumpkin Again

    Nancy Friedman
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:02 am
    A postscript to yesterday’s post about pumpkin (verb) and pumpkin spice latte (beverage): Writing in the Chronicle of Higher Education’s Lingua Franca blog, William Germano questions the grammar and logic of “PSL” and unhyphenated “pumpkin spice.” Starbucks has hailed the return of the beverage with big signs for “PSL.” Is the abbreviation an initialism or an acronym? Are we meant to pronounce each letter or make a word from their consecutive sounds? As an acronym, PSL would become pissl, or even pizzle, which just sounds rude. As an initialism, on the other hand, PSL feels…
  • Lets Pumpkin!

    Nancy Friedman
    18 Sep 2014 | 5:24 am
    I spotted a seasonable new verb in the window of Noah’s New York Bagels in Montclair Village (Oakland): “Prepare to Pumpkin” Unlike the store window, the company website refrains from squash-verbing, or verb-squashing: it simply and modestly claims that “Pumpkin Is Here.” The bounty includes pumpkin bagels, pumpkin shmear, pumpkin muffins, and something called pumpkin clusters. You may have noticed that everyone everywhere is prepared to pumpkin: it’s become the dominant fall flavor. And that may have puzzled you, because pumpkin isn’t really a flavor at all—the squash itself…
  • On the Visual Thesaurus: The Revival of Apothecary

    Nancy Friedman
    16 Sep 2014 | 6:30 am
    My latest column for the Visual Thesaurus, “Going Medieval: The Revival of ‘Apothecary’,” is now live—and this month, you don’t have to be a subscriber to read it. (But of course you should subscribe anyway, right?) In the column, I expand on a Word of the Week entry from earlier this year, tracking the word’s long and interesting history (Chaucer! Shakespeare! Eighteenth-century slang!), reporting on “apothecary” sightings far and wide (from medical marijuana dispensaries to a gastropub), and speculating on the reasons for the word’s new popularity (steampunk,…
  • Word of the Week: Validate

    Nancy Friedman
    15 Sep 2014 | 6:24 am
    Validate: To make legally valid; to sanction; to confirm or corroborate; to authorize; to verify. (“The court validated the contract”; “The judge validated the election”). From Latin validatus, participle form of validus: strong, powerful, effective. Related to valiant. Those are the primary definitions of validate in all of the major dictionaries I consulted: American Heritage, OED, Merriam-Webster, and Macmillan. But validate has some specialized meanings, too, one of which baffled me recently. No, not this one: Image from Peds.org. This usage is common in the U.S. “Parking…
  • Portmanteau-fu

    Nancy Friedman
    12 Sep 2014 | 6:50 am
    Further journeyings in the land of the blend: 1. Kidvasionis a month-long promotion of the San Diego Tourism Authority. This blend is what The Name Inspector would call awkwordplay: a mismatch in syllable emphasis. In one of the blended words, invasion, the stress falls on the second syllable; but in the compound it’s “kid” that needs to be emphasized. Aside from that, I wonder how many parents will read “kids free deals” and think “kids-free deals” and either be disappointed or elated, depending. 2. I’m not entirely certain, but I think Waffullicious, coined by IHOP to…
 
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    languagehat.com

  • Fifth Business.

    languagehat
    20 Sep 2014 | 5:40 pm
    My wife has been reading Robertson Davies’s Deptford Trilogy, and the things she’s muttered or asked about as she’s read have been so intriguing that I’ve started the first novel in the series, Fifth Business. I’ve known about the book most of my life — seen it in bookstores, heard it mentioned, and so on — and always wondered about the odd title; on opening the book I found it immediately explained in a Definition (on a page by itself, where the Dedication would normally go): Those roles which, being neither those of Hero nor Heroine, Confidante nor…
  • Fairy Ann.

    languagehat
    19 Sep 2014 | 4:56 pm
    Back in 2006, we here at LH (always ahead of the curve) discussed the WWI-era Tommyfied French “san fairy Ann” (ça ne fait rien); now Mark Liberman has posted about it at the Log, spurred by David Shariatmadari’s “That eggcorn moment” (“If you’ve been signalled out by friends for saying ‘when all is set and done’, you’re not alone – linguists even have a word for it”). Both Liberman and Shariatmadari quote a wonderful paragraph by Jeanette Winterson about “damp squid”; Liberman goes on to cite this further passage: My father was in Ipres,…
  • Word Usage over Time in Movies and TV.

    languagehat
    18 Sep 2014 | 4:59 pm
    You like Google’s Ngram Viewer (LH post), right? Well, Benjamin Schmidt, an assistant professor of history at Northeastern University, has done the same for movies and TV. You can read about it, and see a couple of samples, here. Data keeps getting more searchable and useful!
  • References, Please.

    languagehat
    17 Sep 2014 | 5:13 pm
    I like Tim Parks. Mind you, I haven’t read any of his books, but I’ve always enjoyed his essays when I’ve come across them, usually in the NYRB. His latest blog post for them, however, makes me want to rap him across the knuckles. It’s an extended whine about how annoying it is to create scholarly references and how he wishes they wouldn’t make him do it any more. Hey, I know exactly how annoying it is; I do it routinely as part of my editing, fixing the references of authors who couldn’t be bothered to do a decent job (or who farmed it out to grad students…
  • The Language of Food.

    languagehat
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:26 pm
    A NY Times story by Jennifer Schuessler (thanks for the link, Bonnie!) draws attention to a new book, The Language of Food: A Linguist Reads the Menu by Dan Jurafsky, a linguistics professor at Stanford, which sounds fascinating: In his book, Mr. Jurafsky traces the gradual fading of French as the lingua franca of “fancy” American restaurants. “Entree” has gone all but extinct at the high end, though there are some holdouts like “jus,” used at Root & Bone to describe the silky chicken gravy served alongside “Grandma Daisy’s Angel Biscuits,” dipping-sauce style. The…
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    A Way with Words

  • Got Your Six

    Alisen Hazzard
    13 Sep 2014 | 8:47 am
    Starting this year, Scripps National Spelling Bee contestants not only have to spell words correctly. A controversial new rule means they’ll have to answer vocabulary questions, too. Also, when it comes to reading text, do you prefer “paper” or “plastic”? Some research suggests that comprehension is slightly better when you read offline instead of on a screen. And the term winkle out, plus bike slang, the military origin of “I’ve got your six,” why the word awfully isn’t awful, and where you’ll find onion snow. This episode first…
  • A Hole to China

    Grant Barrett
    6 Sep 2014 | 8:34 am
    Have a question about objective pronouns? Whom ya gonna call? Wait–is that right? Or would it be “who ya gonna call”? “Whom” may be technically correct, but insisting on it can get you called an elitist. It’s enough to make you nervous as a polecat in a perfume parlor! And if you really want to dig a hole all the way to China, don’t start anywhere in the continental United States–you’ll come out at the bottom of the ocean! Plus, how to pronounce the name of the Show-Me State, catfishing, gallon smashing, and what it means to conversate.
  • Whistling Dixie

    Grant Barrett
    30 Aug 2014 | 9:04 am
    Today’s most popular dog names are Max and Bella. In the Middle Ages, though, dogs would answer to names like Amiable. Or Nosewise. Or even … Clench. ♦ Is the term redneck derogatory? Some folks proudly claim that name. They say it’s high time they were redneckcognized. ♦ Also, the origin of the phrase rule of thumb, whistling Dixie, the eephus pitch, terms for flabby underarms, and craptastic substitutes for swear words, like sacapuntas! This episode first aired March 16, 2013. Download the MP3.  Adult Spelling BeeGrant and Martha recently served as expert…
  • Gnarly Foot

    Grant Barrett
    23 Aug 2014 | 9:48 am
    It’s the Up Goer Five Challenge! Try to describe something complex using only the thousand most common words in English. It’s a useful mental exercise that’s harder than you might think. Also, if you want to make a room dark, you might turn off the lights. But you might also cut them off or shut them. You probably know the experience of hearing or seeing a word so long that it ceases to make sense. But did you know linguists have a term for that? Plus, cumshaw artists, the history of Hoosier and beep, and the debate over whether numbers are nouns or adjectives. This episode…
  • Bump and Grind

    Grant Barrett
    16 Aug 2014 | 8:36 am
    Remember a few years ago when Amazon introduced that mysterious device called a Kindle? People worried that electronic readers would replace traditional books. Turns out the death of the hardcover was greatly exaggerated. Also, the expression “bump and grind” doesn’t always mean what you think. Plus, the origin of jet black, the roots of fugacious, a game called Goin’ to Texas, and how to punctuate the term y’all. And is there anything express about espresso? This episode first aired March 1, 2013. Download the MP3.  E-Book Reading TrendsRemember the olden…
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    Sinosplice » Life

  • Coloring without Rules

    John Pasden
    15 Sep 2014 | 6:22 pm
    I recently gave a talk to some Chinese teachers about IB and AP Chinese programs in the US. In my research for the talk, I did quite a bit of reminiscing about my own 4 years in the Hillsborough High School IB Program. I had all but forgotten about “CAS hours,” and I seriously can’t remember at all what my “Extended Essay” was on. But one thing I totally haven’t forgotten about was “Theory of Knowledge.” That class was seriously cool! It’s also a nice talking point for Chinese teachers, who are always eager to hear about how western…
  • A Pun for Mooncake Day

    John Pasden
    7 Sep 2014 | 8:50 pm
    Today is Mid-Autumn Moon Festival in China, so here’s a little moon pun for you: The first line is where the pun resides. It reads: [moon round moon looking forward (to it)] This is pretty nonsensical because the character for moon, “” has replaced the identical-sounding character . Most intmermediate learners will recognize this character as being part of the 越……越…… pattern. So the meaning is: [The rounder it is, the more you look forward to it] Still seems kind of nonsensical to me (in this context, anyway), but it’s just a lame pun for a billboard. The…
  • Confidence and Tones

    John Pasden
    2 Sep 2014 | 7:03 pm
    It was in the summer of 2012 during a talk with all-star intern Parry that I first discovered that confidence-based learning was a thing. The concept had occurred to me before, but it really gelled when I saw this graph: Confidence-based learning applies to any kind of learning, but I think it applies especially well to mastering the tones of Chinese. Let’s take a quick walk through the four quadrants of the graph above… Uninformed. So this is your typical beginner. You don’t know much, and you know that you don’t know much. It’s hard to say much of anything, and…
  • Pronunciation Practice: the next Evolution

    John Pasden
    25 Aug 2014 | 6:15 pm
    I’m really exited to announce that AllSet Learning now has its own Online Store. After releasing several new products on Apple and Amazon’s platforms in recent years, I’ve discovered that those channels can sometimes be more than a little “challenging.” But those platforms don’t support all of AllSet Learning’s ambitions. Some of the things I want to do won’t be realized even in the next few years, but others can be broken down into simpler units that people can use right now to improve their Chinese. AllSet Learning clients have been benefiting…
  • Summer Nap in Jing’an Park

    John Pasden
    20 Aug 2014 | 6:30 pm
    I couldn’t resist snapping this picture in Jing’an Park: It’s been an unusually short/cool summer in Shanghai. I guess that makes it easier to fall asleep in public with utter abandon? (But then, Chinese people are typically pretty good at that…)
 
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    separated by a common language

  • twang

    lynneguist
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:25 pm
    This is the kind of blog topic I love -- like the soup or bacon sandwich ones -- where I'm reporting on my slowly acquired reali{s/z}ation that there are subtle UK/US differences in meanings of certain familiar words. The meanings are so similar that they often refer to the same things. What's different is where the cent{er/re} and periphery of the meaning are. Because these differences are hard to tease out, we may go through conversations not reali{s/z}ing that we're not quite communicating. Of course, it's loving these kinds of things that got me to be a lexical semanticist in the first…
  • shallot

    lynneguist
    9 Sep 2014 | 4:48 pm
    Typically, as we've discussed before, two-syllable words from French are stressed on their first syllable in BrE and on the second in AmE -- BALlet versus balLET, BAton versus baTON, etc. (Please see and comment on the linked post if that's the issue you're interested in.)photo from: http://www.realseeds.co.uk/onions.htmlThis led me to wonder about shallotbecause it looks like a French borrowing (so many food words are), but the stress pattern is makes it look like it isn't:  BrE shalLOT versus AmE SHALlot or shalLOT. (You can hear them both in an American accent here.)  American…
  • herb

    lynneguist
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:03 pm
    When I started this blog, I wrote short little posts about things I noticed in British and American English. Few read them, and I usually managed to write three a week.  Since then, many more readers and commenters have appeared ([AmE] howdy! thank you!). As I imagine this larger audience responding to posts about X with "But what about Y?", I try to fit the Ys in.  Sometimes the Ys are other expressions that I could discuss; sometimes they are beliefs about language that may or may not have basis in reality. As a result, my posts have got(ten) much longer and less frequent. (The…
  • off-piste, off the beaten track/path, off base

    lynneguist
    1 Aug 2014 | 8:13 am
    Thought I'd dip into the 'to-be-blogged' e-mailbox and click randomly for the next topic, and wouldn't you know it: the thing I clicked on, a five-month-old note from Jan Freeman, is about off-piste, which I used in the last post, leading to some off-piste (and off-piste) discussion in the comments there. So, here I am discussing it again, but that's (orig. AmE) okay because I like things to have their own posts and because it leads me to a few other off- expressions.Off-piste has both literal and figurative uses in BrE. A piste (pronounced 'peest') was originally the path beaten by a horse…
  • America and Americans (p.s. England, Britain & UK!)

    lynneguist
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:54 am
    Here's an argument that doesn't fit well in 140 characters, but I'm constantly being confronted with it on Twitter (and in real life), so I hope you'll excuse me getting it out of my system so that I can just send people a link from now on.This is the kind of thing I get:I suggest you stop calling yourselves American. It is arrogant of people from the United States to call themselves Americans because America is a whole continentThey should be called [insert long-winded or whimsical epithet here].So, let's break that argument down...I suggest... It is arrogantIndividuals from the USA call…
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    Learn French with daily podcasts

  • 1998 – Real Life French: en ligne

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:25 pm
    Real life French Guide Welcome to your lesson of Real Life French. Each lesson we take a simple situation you may encounter in everyday life in France. Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :~
  • 1997 – Le meurtre est naturel (Murder comes naturally)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:22 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Une étude conséquente suggère que les meurtres chez les chimpanzés sont le résultat d’une compétition … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 1996 – Première interdiction (First ban)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:19 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Tout commerce sur cinq espèces de requins est réglementé à partir de maintenant, ce qui constitue … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 1995 – Transport public (Public transport)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:17 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Des systèmes de transports publics efficaces peuvent encourager les gens à laisser leur voiture … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 1994 – De la mastication (From chewing)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    19 Sep 2014 | 10:15 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Des ingénieurs au Canada ont construit une sangle pour le menton qui exploite l’énergie produite … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
 
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    Brave New Words

  • Historical Linguistics by Lyle Campbell

    20 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Like many of you translators, I’m a language nerd, and I like learning more about languages – both specific tongues and also languages and linguistics in general. So I enjoyed Historical Linguistics by Lyle Campbell; it’s a textbook, really, and you wouldn’t want to read it before bed, but it is a fun and interesting book to dip into.Campbell writes on the first page: ”A number of historical linguistics textbooks exist, but this one is different. Most others talk abouthistorical linguistics; they may illustrate concepts and describe methods, and perhaps discuss theoretical issues,…
  • Frustrating

    15 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Not long ago, a journalist phoned me. She was writing an article about translated literature and she wanted some quotes from me. So far, no problem.She brought up the infamous 2% number – i.e., only 2% of the books published each year in English are translations. Yes, I agreed, we aren’t great at publishing translated literature and we should try to learn from other countries/cultures. However, I also pointed out that that figure does seem to be going up, and I mentioned some of the publishers, literary magazines, and other organizations (such as the British Centre for Literary…
  • Illustrated Guide to Becoming a Translator

    10 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    I really liked this illustrated guide to becoming a translator. It’s fun and simple, and it has lots of good tips for people starting out.
  • Translation in Practice

    5 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    It isn’t often that you find the whole text of a useful book online, so be sure to check out Translation in Practice.
  • Idioms

    31 Aug 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Idioms/proverbs/clichés can be one of the hardest bits of a language to learn, and they can also be really challenging to translate.If a Swedish text says, “Don’t sell the bearskin before you’ve shot the bear,” should the translator keep that phrase as is (to retain the Swedishness of the text) or replace it with, say, “Don’t sell your chickens before they’ve hatched” (to make the text fit the English language better)? Or is there another, better solution (a footnote, for instance)? Interestingly, when I go to schools to talk to young people about translation, they are always…
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    English, Jack

  • Climbing the grammar tree

    19 Sep 2014 | 12:04 am
    I've started a new blog called "Climbing the grammar tree". The idea is that I will respond to readings I'm doing for my doctoral studies, so check it out.
  • A title misparsed

    2 Sep 2014 | 2:23 pm
    This morning, I was reading this article at New Statesman, when I came across the following:Yet surely, when night after night atrocities are served up to us as entertainment, it's worth some anxiety. We become clockwork oranges if we accept all this pop culture without asking what's in it.The plural clockwork oranges suddenly threw into sharp relief the title of Burgess's book A clockwork orange. For some reason that I am unable to articulate now, if I ever was aware of it, I had always parsed that title like this:That is to say, I took orange to be a postpositive modifier of clockwork (like…
  • Antedating "determinative"

    19 Aug 2014 | 5:13 am
    The OED gives: b. Gram. determinative adjective, determinative pronoun, etc. (see quots.); determinative compound = tatpurusha n.1921   E. Sapir Lang. vi. 135   The words of the typical suffixing languages (Turkish, Eskimo, Nootka) are ‘determinative’ formations, each added element determining the form of the whole anew.1924   H. E. Palmer Gram. Spoken Eng. ii. 24   To group with the pronouns all determinative adjectives..shortening the term to determinatives.1933   L. Bloomfield Language xiv. 235   One…
  • Proscribing, narrowly

    7 Jul 2014 | 5:24 am
    Over at the NYT, Alexander Nazaryan has a rather strident article about "The fallacy of balanced literacy." Therein, he writes, "balanced literacy is an especially irresponsible approach, given that New York State has adopted the federal Common Core standards, which skew toward a narrowly proscribed list of texts, many of them nonfiction." [Now changed to narrowly prescribed.]These texts are prescribed. That is, they're imposed, not declared unacceptable or invalid. Nevertheless, the Google Books corpus suggests narrowly proscribed is a new and growing phrase. So, I'm curious: was this…
  • Thinking like a freak

    23 Jun 2014 | 6:48 am
    I listen to the Freakonomics Radio podcast from time to time, and back in May they aired an episode called "the three hardest words...," which, purportedly, were I don't know. The premise was that people hate to admit ignorance and so they hardly ever say, "I don't know."Except that in most corpus studies, the head-and-shoulders most common, number one, top-of-the-heap three-word string in English is I don't know (It's a three-word string, not four, since -n't is an inflectional suffix, not just a contraction as is taught in elementary schools, but that's another issue.) For instance, in the…
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    Thoughts On Translation

  • Off-topic: How to keep blogging for a really long time

    Corinne McKay
    9 Sep 2014 | 1:17 pm
    …well, a “really long time” in Internet years. When I click “Publish” on this post, WordPress will cheerfully tell me that it’s the 552nd post that I’ve written since February of 2008, which is when I took Beth Hayden’s introductory blogging class and decided to give it a go. So my blog will be six […]
  • Shouting and moaning about bad clients: productive, or not?

    Corinne McKay
    5 Sep 2014 | 9:26 am
    This post is inspired by something Ted Wozniak posted on Facebook, linking to Sébastien Devogele’s blog post “The Rate Rant.” The issue: translators who complain about bottom-feeding agencies that pay low rates, endlessly try to drive down prices even further through fuzzy match discounts, treat translators as a cog in the production machine, etc. Some […]
  • Word counts for all files in a folder

    Corinne McKay
    3 Sep 2014 | 12:15 pm
    This is a small tip, but so exciting that I couldn’t resist sharing (nerd alert…). You probably have a feature-rich word-counting tool, or a TM tool that does complicated word counts. But let’s say that you want to do a quick-and-dirty word count of a bunch of files without opening them one by one. Like […]
  • Getting Started as a Freelance Translator- starts September 24

    Corinne McKay
    3 Sep 2014 | 9:54 am
    The next session of my online course for beginning translators, Getting Started as a Freelance Translator, starts on September 24, and there are currently three spots left. This is a four-week course for translators in any language combination; we focus on four targeted assignments (your resume and cover letter, marketing plan, rates and billable hours […]
  • Using clients’ names: OK or not?

    Corinne McKay
    2 Sep 2014 | 10:08 am
    A reader asks: On my website and resumé, is it OK to use my clients’ names? Does it matter if I worked for them directly or through an agency? Short answer: To be safe, never use a client’s name without their permission. If you’re “sure that the client won’t mind,” then why not take two […]
 
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    Global by Design

  • One probable beneficiary of Scotland independence: .SCOT

    John Yunker
    18 Sep 2014 | 8:15 am
    So today is the big day for the people of Scotland as well as the UK. One question that occurs to country code geeks such as myself is what country code domain would Scotland use if/when it became separate from .UK? It turns out that one domain is already available right now: .scot. However, this isn’t technically a […]
  • What’s the ROI of web globalization?

    John Yunker
    10 Sep 2014 | 1:52 pm
    I’ve been meaning to write about this for awhile. A few months ago, Apple CEO Tim Cook reportedly said this at an investor meeting: “When we work on making our devices accessible by the blind,” he said, “I don’t consider the bloody ROI.” I love this quote. And I love any CEO who knows when the […]
  • What’s wrong with this global gateway?

    John Yunker
    3 Sep 2014 | 3:33 pm
    A few things. First, using flags to indicate language is almost always a mistake. Second, why are the language names all in English? Only the “English language” text needs to be in English. The purpose of the gateway is to communicate with speakers of other languages, not just English speakers. Finally, do we need “Language” at all? […]
  • Managing language expectations when you can’t translate everything

    John Yunker
    27 Aug 2014 | 2:30 pm
    I don’t know of any large company that translates all of its content into all of its target languages. I won’t go into the many reasons for why this is — money being the major reason — but I will say that if this is an issue you struggle with you’re not alone. The key to […]
  • Buick: A Chinese success story

    John Yunker
    26 Aug 2014 | 9:31 am
    I still look at the Buick brand as something for the post-60 demographic (though I must confess that demographic doesn’t feel quite so old anymore). It’s an image Buick has been working to change for years. But the beauty of globalization is that Buick doesn’t carry this sort of generational baggage in other countries. Like China. The Chinese apparently love […]
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    Web-Translations » Blog Posts

  • Voiceover or Subtitles – how should video be translated?

    Cassandra Oliver
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:05 am
    When  it comes to localising video content, you have a choice of using either subtitles on screen or a voice-over of any dialogue or narration. The best option for your needs will depend on several factors, and of course budget is a consideration too. Here we share advice from Alistair Langfield from our specialist voiceover & subtitling partner, Matinée. There are two main methods of translating video: Subtitles A translation which the viewer reads on screen while the foreign language narrative or dialogue remains on the recording Voiceover/dubbing Where a translated version of the…
  • 10 Tips for learning a new language

    Cassandra Oliver
    12 Sep 2014 | 1:58 am
    The post 10 Tips for learning a new language appeared first on Web-Translations.
  • Which languages are the hardest to learn?

    Cassandra Oliver
    5 Sep 2014 | 7:19 am
    The post Which languages are the hardest to learn? appeared first on Web-Translations.
  • Give your small business (and UK Government) an international boost

    Guest Author
    3 Sep 2014 | 9:27 am
    In 2012, George Osbourne revealed his aim to double UK exports by 2020 but unfortunately, things have not been going according to plan. According to the British Chamber of Commerce, exports increased by only 0.5% in 2012 and by 2.1% in 2013. This is thought to be down to businesses seeing branching out internationally as too large a risk. However, expanding your business overseas could be extremely beneficial: it’s all about choosing the right market for your product and going in with a well thought-out strategy. Let’s take a look at some of the world’s emerging markets. Perhaps one of…
  • Social Media – the Key to Export Success?

    Cassandra Oliver
    29 Aug 2014 | 7:09 am
    Are you using social media to enhance the export success of your business? If your company exports to B2B customers overseas, and uses Social Media as part of your marketing strategy, then Egyptian academic Ziad Abdelmoety would like to hear from you: he is currently writing a thesis on the role and use of social media by UK companies in the export sector. This is obviously a hot topic of interest and the results have the potential to benefit UK businesses that need to engage the new forms of marketing communications in their export strategy. Ziad is an academic at Assuit University…
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    A Woman Learning Thai... and some men too ;-)| Women Learn Thai

  • Housecleaning: Apologies for the Mess

    Catherine Wentworth
    21 Sep 2014 | 1:46 am
    You have my apologies… Over a month ago I started housecleaning on WLT and I thought I’d be done by now. Apologies. I should have warned you sooner. The site is over six years old and there’s 600 plus posts to make right. This is my to-do list so far: Dead links. Links that go to smut sites. Links that go to parked pages. And that darn audio player needing updating. The Broken Link Checker WP plugin was a huge help with dead links. WHY I waited so long to add it, I’ll never know. Fixing six years of broken links all at once was a pain. Broken Link Checker isn’t a…
  • Successful Thai Language Learner: Ruth Curtis

    Catherine Wentworth
    17 Sep 2014 | 5:30 pm
    Interviewing Successful Thai Language Learners… Name: Ruth Curtis Nationality: American Age range: 62 Sex: Female Location: Bangkok Thailand Profession: Missionary [church planter] currently work together with my husband in personnel management for Thailand field member care of OMF Intl. What is your Thai level? Fluent nearly native: speaking, reading, writing, typing, teaching. Do you speak more street Thai, Issan Thai, or professional Thai? Both street and professional. What were your reasons for learning Thai? I came as a missionary with OMF International, and after only 1yr (10…
  • Thai Style: The Rhythm of Thai Language

    Kru Jiab
    10 Sep 2014 | 5:30 pm
    Sound like a native Thai speaker.. “You sound like you’re from London!” Well, I wish someone said that to me! As a native Thai speaker with English as a second language, it would be my definition of being a native English speaker. The journey to sound like a native speaker is not an easy journey. It can take years and years of exposure and for most people they may never speak like a native. I think my journey to sound British will take me a lifetime! When learning a second language, you can be fluent but in order to sound like a native speaker, it is not just about the pronunciation…
  • Memorize Thai Tones With Five Simple Rules

    Ryan Hickey
    6 Sep 2014 | 8:52 pm
    Memorize Thai Tones With Five Simple Rules… I just made big strides with reading tones/ tone markers and would like to share my findings with anyone interested. I’ve been a successful Piano and Music teacher and pride myself on finding how humans learn, and unveiling easier ways to understand concepts. The parallels of learning music and languages are staggering, so I’ve been reworking my approach of learning Thai from my musical practices. I would first like to say that, initially, I tried to just memorize tone rules from the gate. I found that it got me nowhere fast. What…
 
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    Russian Language Blog

  • Seven Things about Russia You Didn’t Know

    Jenya
    15 Sep 2014 | 10:21 pm
    Russia_2726B – Lets Party by flickr user Dennis Jarvis Many of you know so much about Russia! Some of you were fortunate enough to go there, others spent a lot of time reading about it.  Whatever the case, I hope the information below fuels your curiosity even more and propels you to dive deeper into the culture and history of this country, a country so big that it has 9 time zones. What follows are some interesting bits of information that might catch you by surprise! 1. The Russian language doesn’t contain “the” and “a” in it (we do not have articles).
  • Russian Tour Operators Going Out Of Business

    Maria
    15 Sep 2014 | 12:40 am
    Image by OakleyOriginals on flickr.com Those of you who follow Russian news might have heard that several travel agencies (туроперторы, турагнтства) have gone out of business (разорлись). A few have gone bankrupt (объявли о банкртстве) while others have suspended operations (приостановли дятельность). As you know from a previous post, Russian tourists love traveling abroad, so people who had paid the travel agency for their trips are now stranded abroad. This story has been in the news throughout the summer in Russia, and…
  • Vladimir Putin: Interesting Facts About the Man Behind the (Iron) Curtain

    Jenya
    9 Sep 2014 | 11:19 pm
    Though this blog usually centers on Russian culture and the language, certain events have transpired lately that are keeping the Russian president in the spotlight. For those living outside of Russia, he may be seen as a mysterious man, perhaps a hero to some and a villain to others. Your knowledge about him may be limited to what you see on television or read in the headlines. I have found some interesting facts about Vladimir Putin that you will hopefully find interesting. Please keep in mind that I am not supporting or condemning him, simply sharing some information that I’ve found.
  • Personal Safety in Russia

    Maria
    8 Sep 2014 | 12:20 am
    Image by Andrew King on flickr.com Personal safety is a subject that is important not just from a cultural standpoint but also in terms of navigating a different society and avoiding harm. There are many things that are shared among cultures in terms of what they view as reasonable precautions — not talking to strangers for children, not sharing your credit card details, etc. However, there are also considerable differences in what is considered safe behavior in different contexts. I would like to talk about some Russian safety conventions that visitors may not be aware of. Saying Your…
  • Common Russian Medicines

    Maria
    4 Sep 2014 | 12:17 am
    Image by e-magine art on flickr.com If you are traveling to Russia or staying in the country for a longer period of time, chances are you might need to run to the pharmacy (аптка) at some point. I would like to give an overview of Russian medicines (лекрства) and their uses. This post is for reference only and is not meant to constitute medical advice. Feel free to follow the links to the drug pages so you can research them, consult a doctor, if needed, and make informed decisions if you ever feel sick in Russia. The first thing you need to know is that Russian pharmacies…
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    Polish Language Blog

  • Everyone knows word “mama”, no matter what language you speak!

    Kasia
    14 Sep 2014 | 12:11 pm
    There is a word, and only one, spoken the same way in nearly every language known to humankind. That word, of course, is “mama.” That’s me with my first baby daughter…:) I’m such a lucky mama! “Mama” is one of the many words children use to refer to their mother. You see the same or similar word being used across various languages. When native English speaking children start talking, they start calling their mothers “mama”, “momma” or “mom”. In German, Russian, Greek, Polish, Spanish, Portuguese Romanian and Dutch mother is “mama”. In French…
  • Back to school time!

    Kasia
    31 Aug 2014 | 2:03 pm
    Can’t believe summer is over already! Especially when you live in New Hampshire…and winters may last 7 months! Anyway…it was a great summer. Weather was amazing and I was able to spend some quality time with my family at the beach, paddle boarding on the lake, biking and camping! I found this really cute Polish poem about end of the summer/back to school time! Here it is with translation and pronunciation video:) Powrót do szkoły Na dworze biegają dzieci śmieją się bawią ochoczo jeszcze słoneczko im świeci i z wakacjami się droczą Pogoda wrześniem spojrzała…
  • What do you know about terrorism?

    Kasia
    30 Aug 2014 | 3:00 pm
    Image by slagheap on Flickr.com Understanding terrorism (terroryzm) has gained actuality after the September 11 attacks (ataki) in New York. The number of victims – and the direct material damages – is by far the largest in the history of terrorism, even if assessed in relative terms, compared to the US population and output. Despite huge fluctuations in intensity (duże wahania w intensywności) over time, the history of terrorism shows it has evolved from ideologically-based (oparte ideologicznie) to religious-based (oparte na bazie religijnej), and becoming more lethal…
  • Why should you visit Kaszuby?

    Kasia
    23 Aug 2014 | 3:31 pm
    Kaszuby Province lies in the northern edge of Poland. It spreads over south and west from the sea port of Gdańsk on the Baltic Sea and covers an extensive area of varying landscapes – from sand dunes to forests and hills. The most important feature of the Kaszuby region is the thousands of lakes that abound the area. It is because of these lakes it is also called the Kashubian Lakeland (Jeziora Kaszubskie). The region promises an exciting holiday in the sun and the sea combined with heritage sites and folk culture. Marked by a strong ethnic culture, the Kaszuby region has been the…
  • ALS ice bucket challenge? A little more about it in Polish

    Kasia
    22 Aug 2014 | 4:45 am
    If you are on the social media (and probably 95 % of us are) you most likely heard about ALS bucket challenge. Almost all of social media pages have been deluged lately with videos and pictures of friends, family and random celebrities dumping buckets of ice-cold water over their heads. The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge (literally “wyzwanie wiadra lodu” ) began as a way to raise money and awareness for ALS research. It’s taking the entire nation by storm. The ALS challenge itself is an easy enough thing to do: If a friend takes the challenge, challenges you to do the same in a…
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    Ingls na Ponta da Lngua

  • O que significa put the squeeze on?

    Denilso de Lima
    20 Sep 2014 | 2:20 pm
    Se você ainda não sabe o que significa put the squeeze on, chegou a hora de aprender. É só continuar lendo esta dica. Indo direto ao ponto, put the squeeze on significa simplesmente pressionar, apertar. Mas, ela não é usada para expressar o sentido de pressionar ou apertar qualquer coisa. Na verdade, put the squeeze on sempre fará referência ao ato de pressionarmos ou apertamos alguém para fazer o que nós queremos que elas façam. Assim, podemos dizer que put the squeeze on significa colocar pressão em, fazer pressão em, encostar na parede, pressionar, forçar. Para facilitar a…
  • O que significa to add insult to injury?

    Denilso de Lima
    20 Sep 2014 | 8:50 am
    Quer saber quando usar e o que significa add insult to injury? Então, anote aí que de modo geral, add insult to injury é uma das expressões usadas em inglês para dizer que alguém fez alguma coisa para piorar ainda mais uma situação que já estava péssima. Em português, podemos traduzi-la assim: E para piorar E como se isso não bastasse E para piorar a situação E para lascar logo tudo de uma vez E para agravar ainda mais a situação E para aumentar ainda mais os estragos Veja o uso dela nos exemplos a seguir: They told me I was too old for the job, and then to add insult to…
  • Qual a diferença entre already, yet e ever?

    Denilso de Lima
    18 Sep 2014 | 12:51 pm
    As palavras already, yet e ever na maioria das vezes são traduzidas como já. Isso acaba deixando muitos estudantes de inglês confusos sobre quando usar cada uma delas. Portanto, em uma tentativa de resolver isso, nesta dica falarei – ou tentarei falar – sobre a diferença entre already, yet e ever no sentido de já. Para facilitar vamos ver o uso de cada palavra separadamente. ALREADY Talvez a palavra mais simples de entender e aprender usar. Afinal, é só ler exemplos com ela para ver que não há segredos: He’s only 24, but he’s already achieved worldwide fame. (Ele tem…
  • Como dizer já está na hora de em inglês?

    Denilso de Lima
    17 Sep 2014 | 12:21 pm
    Para dizer já está na hora de em inglês use a expressão it’s time. Embora, pareça estranho, saiba que é assim mesmo que expressamos essa ideia em inglês. Veja os exemplos abaixo para perceber isso. It’s time you went to bed, little boy! (Já é hora de você ir dormir, rapazinho.) It’s time you learned how to do this. (Já está na hora de você aprender a fazer isso.) It’s time they did something to help us. (Já é hora deles fazerem algo para nos ajudar.) It’s time he went home. (Já está na hora dele ir para casa.) It’s time Carla showed more interested in her studies.
  • Colocando o Present Perfect na Prática

    Denilso de Lima
    16 Sep 2014 | 8:14 am
    Em meus livros e ebooks, eu sempre sugiro que o estudante de inglês preste muita atenção em como a língua é usada em contextos reais. Além disso, sugiro também que em se tratando de estruturas gramaticais faça sempre uma comparação com o modo como a mesma ideia em inglês é expressa em português. Isso ajuda e muito na hora de fazer uso de uma estrutura gramatical como o Present Perfect, por exemplo. Confesso a você que ao comecei a estudar inglês – e mesmo quando eu me preparava para o “temido” CPE (Certificate of Proficiency in English) da Cambridge –, eu tinha meus…
 
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    Babel's Dawn

  • Dolphins Know Each Other by Name

    Blair
    15 Sep 2014 | 3:23 pm
    Signature whistles can be heard in a variety of dolphin species. Suppose I had an eight-month old baby who liked to say something like gork, and I told you that one day I heard the baby's two-year-old brother make a perfect imitation of the gork sound, to which the baby responded, hello. Would you conclude from this evidence that the baby is already using language? Careful, for it seems that bottlenose dolphins can participate in these sorts of exchanges. While most people agree that only people use language, there does not appear to be nearly as much agreement on what makes language so…
  • More on Basic and Extended Syntax

    Blair
    8 Sep 2014 | 11:49 am
    Question pronouns are important but hard to visualize. Yesterday I posted a notice about a review article by Heather K.J. van der Lely and Steven Pinker titled "The biological basis of language," that reports the brain supports two separate syntax networks which the authors call basic and extended syntax. I did not go into the grammatical analysis of that paper because it was irrelevant to my focus, which was on the multi-step evolutionary process implicit in their account. In this post, I do want to look at their grammatical analysis because it differs from the way I look at language. Can I…
  • A Breakthrough Paper

    Blair
    7 Sep 2014 | 11:57 am
    Sophie's Story looks at the strengths and limitations of Specific Language Impairment. The story of language and its origins that has been emerging on this blog is fairly simple: Members of the human lineage began using words when a population became communal enough to trust one another with shared knowledge. Those first language users differed from their ancestors in the nature of their community, not in the acquisition of some new verbal skill. Once populations of language users became competitive, selection pressures to enrich language functions grew stronger and new verbal abilities did…
  • A Surprising Meeting at the Summit

    Blair
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:11 pm
    Napoleon and the tsar meet at Tilsit to agree on their spheres of interest. (But Tolstoy still got a story to tell) Talk about a marriage of irreconcilables! PLOS Biology has published an article titled "How Could Language Have Evolved?" and like all PLOS papers it is available online to anybody interested. The topic is absolutely the question I've been asking myself for the past 45 years so it should be up my alley. Regrettably it doesn't seem to say anything that hasn't already been discussed in this blog. Nevertheless, it has a distinguished set of authors who are famous for their…
  • Which Came First, the Word or the Gesture?

    Blair
    19 Aug 2014 | 2:54 pm
    I got a good laugh out of this cartoon on Alex Baker's Cake or Death cartoon file. And it fits in with this post's point: gestures have their limits. Susan Goldin-Meadow is a hero on this blog because her work is both serious and original. It fills a gap in our understanding. In 2008 she presented a report on gesture that has stayed with me. It made clear that gestures are a natural way of illustrating what is not included in a grammatical structure. For example, a person might say, "The plane ride was very…" and then illustrate the ride by moving the hand horizontally while simultaneously…
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    Macmillan

  • Language and words in the news – 19th September, 2014

    Liz Potter
    19 Sep 2014 | 2:30 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Language tip of the week: forget

    Liz Potter
    18 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, etc. This week’s language tip helps with alternatives for the verb forget: have no recollection of something to... [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Life skills tip of the week: ways of giving advice

    Liz Potter
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Learning about pragmatics and how to express yourself successfully is a useful life skill, said Michael Rundell in January when he introduced the new pragmatics series on Macmillan Dictionary. The series is part of the Macmillan Life Skills campaign, offering free resources for English language students and teachers each month. As part of the... [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Can you twig it?

    Stan Carey
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    Given how close Ireland and Britain are geographically, standard English has surprisingly few words that originated in Irish (less surprising when politics and social history are taken into account). Examples include banshee, galore, shamrock, and perhaps smithereens. Informal English has a few more, one of which may be twig, meaning ‘realise’ or... [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Language and words in the news – 13th September, 2014

    Liz Potter
    13 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
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    "I kinda like languages" blog

  • Common European Languages Framework (CEFR) and Vocabulary Size

    lyzazel
    2 Sep 2014 | 4:23 am
    The Common European Languages Framework does not provide a clear vocabulary size for any of its levels, so we do not know how many knows words are expected at each level. Milton and Alexiou have attempted to do that in 2009, however (source: Milton J and T. Alexiou (2009). Vocabulary size and the Common European Framework of Reference in Languages. In B.Richards, H. Daller, D. Malvern, P. Meara, J. Milton and J. Treffers-Daller (eds), Vocabulary studies in first and second language acquisition. Palgrave: Macmillan, 194-211.). Here’s their table for English and French, with the addition…
  • Bosley’s New Friends – Children Book in Japanese Review

    lyzazel
    8 Jun 2014 | 5:44 am
    I got my hands of the Japanese edition of the book Bosley’s New Friends by The Language Bear for the purpose of reviewing it. The book is very short, but it seems like an interesting way for children (and perhaps even adults) to learn Japanese: it uses simple phrases, has bilingual translations and uses lovely imagery. Here are some pictures of the book that I have taken: One feature I have liked is highlighted words. Each page has one or a couple of key words highlighted, making it easy to distinguish them in the Japanese and English texts. Sometimes the book even uses a few colors in…
  • How To Learn Russian through Interlinear translations

    lyzazel
    15 Feb 2014 | 4:46 pm
    Those who know about this blog, possibly also know that I have been involved in trying to write about ways to learn Russian. I have also made a short Russian course and a Russian alphabet course. I would now like to present to my readers another way for one to learn or improve  Russian – reading a Russian Interlinear translation of Tolstoy. The translation includes the entire story “The Death of Ivan Ilyich” in the Interlinear format, where each phrase or expression is translated to English right below it. Here’s an example of the translation:   Example of the…
  • Guestpost: Language Exchanges – Do They Really Work?

    lyzazel
    27 Nov 2013 | 3:24 pm
    Language exchanges are becoming increasingly popular as a cost-effective (usually free) way to learn a new language. I’d never really considered using them, until I moved to Taiwan. To be honest, with you, they were very low on my radar for actively seeking out a language exchange partner. In the past, I’d found living in a different country and just assimilating myself a good way to learn a new language. However, I became more curious about them when a friend was telling me about his experience. His Chinese at the time seemed fairly proficient, and I was impressed that he’d got to his…
  • InterLinear Translations Now Available at InterlinearBooks.com!

    lyzazel
    27 Oct 2013 | 6:31 pm
    I would like to let all of you know of the newly launched site InterlinearBooks.com that serves Interlinear book translations for language learners. Interlinear translation is a great and yet undiscovered method to learn languages, and I wish you all to find out about it. So what exactly is Interlinear translation? Interlinear is a translation method that includes the original and an English translation just below in smaller font. And that’s exactly what InterlinearBooks.com does – it takes interesting literature and translates it in the Interlinear format so that you can read…
 
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    Pimsleur Approach Blog

  • World Tour: Oktoberfest Celebrations from Around the Globe!

    Laura Mundow
    19 Sep 2014 | 7:11 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com Once upon a time, in the land where fairytales were born, a prince married a princess. The people of Munich were invited to a party to celebrate the marriage of Crown Prince Ludwig (later to become King Ludwig I) and Princess Therese, and the very first Oktoberfest was born. Oktoberfest celebrates its 181st birthday this year and has grown from a wedding celebration to the world’s biggest festival. Around six million partygoers land in Munich to celebrate Oktoberfest every year. While Munich’s Oktoberfest is undoubtedly one for the bucket list, the rest…
  • September Chatterbox: Find Out How to Increase the Size of Your Brain, How Video Games Help Language Learning & More!

    Pimsleur Approach
    17 Sep 2014 | 6:46 am
    Welcome to this month’s Chatterbox! We have all the important language-learning news, scientific developments and advice, as well as a blog we know you’ll love. Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com The Science of Language Learning a foreign language can increase the size of your brain. This is what Swedish scientists discovered when they used brain scans to monitor what happens when someone learns a second language. Young adult military recruits with a flare for languages learned Arabic, Russian or Dari intensively, while a control group of science students also studied hard, but not…
  • Top TEN Reasons YOU Should Study Abroad

    Will Noble
    15 Sep 2014 | 8:50 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com 10 Reasons You Should Study Abroad Come back the person you always wanted to be Pimsleur Approach’s Study Abroad Scholarship Contest is up and running. Our scholarship is in honor of renowned linguist and language educator, Dr. Paul Pimsleur – and the idea of it is to help make language and culture more accessible to American college students. To celebrate, we’ve come up with 10 reasons why studying abroad is the right thing to do. 1. Escape the daily grind Falling into a pattern at home – whether you’re at college, work or otherwise…
  • September Travel Roundup: Instagram Transforms Travel Videos, Amsterdam’s Eighth Wonder Hotel, Icelandic Volcanos & More!

    Pimsleur Approach
    12 Sep 2014 | 6:26 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com Carole King sang that “it might as well rain until September,” but we think the tipping point from summer to autumn is one of the best times to go traveling. Still need convincing? Read on… READING You would have to have been hiding under a rock not to know about THAT reclining airline seat spat, but this NY Times columnist looks at the story from a cool, financial angle. Speaking of chilly, Ireland — where you can experience four seasons in one hour — isn’t usually noted for its beaches. But that’s a mistake, according to the Irish…
  • Five Reasons Why You Should Learn a 2nd Language Today!

    Will Noble
    9 Sep 2014 | 6:53 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com From international relationships to dinner table mishaps, there’s only so long you can get away with not learning another language. Sooner or later, you’re going to run headlong into a challenge, obstacle or embarrassment that will have you reaching for the foreign language learning tapes. We’ve pooled together a list of signs that tell you it’s no longer all right to shirk away from the realities of the world with your single native tongue. And you’ll be happy you didn’t ignore these signs – we promise you!
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    PhraseMix.com Blog

  • How to remember phrasal verbs without mixing them up

    25 Aug 2014 | 9:30 pm
    You have to learn phrasal verbs if you want to sound natural in English. English speakers use phrasal verbs all the time. They give our language color and life. How have you learned phrasal verbs in the past? Most English learners study phrasal verbs in lists grouped by verb like these: go out with (someone) go around (doing something) go for (something) go on about (something) This approach has a problem, though: it's easy to forget which words at the end (which we call 'particles'*) to use. It's easy to get them mixed up later when you try to remember which phrasal verb to use. I'd like to…
  • My crazy challenge for you: become a YouTube star!

    12 Aug 2014 | 4:06 am
    If you already have plenty of English-speaking friends or colleagues, you can skip this advice. Just go talk to them and make sure to keep doing it each day. But if your big problem is that you don't have anyone to use English with, I have a solution for you. A way to find people to speak English with I'd like you to make a video of yourself speaking English and put it up on the Internet. The reason for doing this is to make contact with English speakers, both native speakers and other learners like you. If you create something interesting, people will find it. Then maybe they will…
  • 41 unique ways to practice listening to English

    13 Jul 2014 | 8:55 am
    Our PhraseMix Premium service gives you a super-easy way to improve your English by listening to key example sentences. But there are lots of other ways to practice listening to English, if you're willing to put in the time and effort. We've pulled together a big list of 41 interesting ways that you can improve your listening skill. Tweet This Idea! Get hooked on an English TV show. Find an English-language drama or comedy that seems interesting, and start watching it from the beginning. Follow the storylines and get to know all the characters. Not sure what to watch? Here's a list of some of…
  • Another interview: ALsensei from the English 2.0 podcast

    10 Apr 2014 | 4:59 am
    ALsensei from alsensei.com interviewed me recently for his English 2.0 podcast. We talked about the most common questions English learners ask, my ideas for how to learn English faster, and tips for being productive. Check out the interview here: English 2.0 Teacher Interview 5 - Aaron from PhraseMix
  • A cool trick for memorizing sentences

    2 Nov 2013 | 6:34 pm
    Someone recently told me about a cool trick for memorizing things.  I wish I could remember who told me about the trick, and where they got it from. But I looked the trick up online and found an article about it from QuickAndDirtyTips.com. Imagine that you're trying to memorize a PhraseMix sentence (which I strongly recommend that you do). The normal way to memorize the sentence would be to repeat the full thing, again and again, from the beginning. So try that now. Read this sentence out loud to yourself five times: “I'd just like to say, on behalf of everyone here, good luck in…
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    Globalization Partners International - Blog

  • Android Provides a World of Language Support

    13 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    In the 9 years since Google acquired Android it has grown to be the world's most popular mobile operating system. To do so the Google Android team developed language support features so that Android OS-based phones fully function in the language of the user's choice. Here is a view of how much of the world has accepted Android (Table by Canalys): The list of languages currently supported within Android are: Language Language Code Afrikaans af Amharic am Bulgarian bg Catalan ca Chinese (PRC) zh-CN Chinese (Taiwan) zh-TW Croatian hr Czech cs Danish da Dutch nl English (UK) en-GB English (US)…
  • Follow the Perfect SEO Recipe to Serve a Perfect Website

    7 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Like trying to cook a new dish, launching a new website can be a scary process for any webmaster or business owner. Your website is a smooth mixture of many ingredients which you must mix all together in the perfect quantities and qualities. If you forget to add all of the proper ingredients, your dish does not taste right. The same goes for your website, forget just one ingredient and your website does not look, feel or work right. You need among other items, good fresh content, but if you forget to add the SEO ingredients (correct metadata in the correct amounts as one example), then your…
  • How to create eBook Fixed Layout with Adobe InDesign CC 2014

    2 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    One of the most powerful tools to create eBooks is Adobe InDesign. Historically the ability to create eBooks with a fixed layout format was a challenge. Creating an eBook in this special format was complicated with previous versions of InDesign because it required special plug-ins and extra work outside of InDesign. Now with the new release of CC 2014, no more extra plug-ins or work!   Fixed Layout ePUB Format Unlike standard EPUB, when you create an EPUB Fixed Layout, your pages come out looking just the way you have designed them. This format is suited for creating eBooks with complex…
  • Middle East Languages and Locales: Essential Facts

    27 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Although the Middle East remains an economically, politically, culturally, and religiously sensitive region, due largely to the implications of the Arab Spring in 2011, the potential for growth and gains in the region is becoming stronger.   Middle East GDP growth is projected at 3.6% for 2014 and 4.2% for 2015. Gulf Cooperation Council countries have combined assets in Sovereign Wealth Funds estimated at $2.25 trillion ($975 billion held by UAE and 680 billion held by Saudi Arabia) Population of the Middle East is expected to rise by 17.3% between 2014 and 2024. Qatar's GDP per capita…
  • 3 Reasons to attend the upcoming Sitecore Symposium

    25 Aug 2014 | 5:00 pm
    The Sitecore Symposium in Las Vegas will be held September 8th - 10th at the Aria Resort. Sitecore refers to its product as the leading customer experience software. I would say after attending a number of content management related conferences this year that 2014 is the year of the customer. 2013 ended with 'Content' as the keyword, but soon the buzz word became the 'Customer', with 'content' still close behind. Sitecore has a very good reason to refer to their product as customer experience software as it is much more than a content management system. Sitecore has made quite an effort…
 
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    Lexiophiles

  • Thoughts on Our Life Perceptions

    Ata
    19 Sep 2014 | 1:01 am
    Let everyone be. It is true that each is to their own but a less broad world view and little knowledge doesn’t contribute to the society in general. Information needs to spread and people need to learn. How did we advance at the past tens of thousands of years? Just by sitting and ignoring what’s around us? When you analyse history you will notice that mankind rose to prosperity and wealth by connecting. Even from the most basics of Trade to now. Humans might have warred and killed each other but when you look at the overall picture we triumphed and have somehow dominated as a…
  • İnsanlarin Hayata Bakışları Üzerine Düşünceler

    Ata
    19 Sep 2014 | 1:00 am
    Herkesi olduğu gibi bırak ve kabul et denir. Elbette her bireyin kendisinden sorumlu olduğu doğrudur ama dünyaya olan dar bir bakış açısı ve az bilgi sahibi insanlar genel olarak zihinsel açıdan topluma bir katkıda bulunamıyor. 10.000’lerce yılda biz nasıl geliştik? Sadece oturarak ve dünyamızda olanlarla ilgilenmeyerek mi? Tarihi dikkatli incelersek insanların zenginliğe ve gelişmişliğe birbirleri aralarında iletişim kurarak geldiğini görürüz. Basit bir takas ticaretinden bu yana gelen bir gelişmedir bu. İnsanlar birbirleri aralarında savaşmış…
  • What Does It Mean “To Read a Yellow”? Let’s Learn Some Colourful Italian Expressions!

    Benedetta
    18 Sep 2014 | 1:01 am
    In this article, we will explore some Italian expressions which contain colour terms and we will discuss the symbolic and emotional meanings attached to them. Colour terms have been at the centre of a linguistic debate for decades. On the one hand, the universalistic side, represented by Berlin and Kay (1969), claims that the basic colour terms of any culture are predictable by the number of colour terms a culture has, following this implicational scale: Stage I: Dark-cool and light-warm Stage II: Red Stage III: Either green or yellow Stage IV: Both green and yellow Stage V: Blue Stage VI:…
  • Espressioni Italiane Di Tutti I Colori

    Benedetta
    18 Sep 2014 | 1:00 am
    In questo articolo esploriamo alcune espressioni italiane che contengono cromonimi (ossia nomi dei colori) e i significati simbolici ad essi connessi. I cromonimi sono da decadi al centro di un dibattito linguistico. Da una parte, Berlin e Kay (1969) sostengono che i cromonimi base sono universalmente deducibili dal numero di cromonimi che una determinata cultura presenta, seguendo l’ordine una scala implicazionale: Stadio I: Scuro- freddo e chiaro-caldo Stadio II: Rosso Stadio III: Verde o giallo Stadio IV: Sia verde che giallo Stadio V: Blu Stadio VI: Marrone Stadio VII: Viola, rosa,…
  • Cracking the Code: How Brazilians Write on the Internet

    Laís
    17 Sep 2014 | 1:01 am
    Got a Brazilian pen pal? Congrats … and good luck! Why? Because even though you might have mastered the finest forms of writing and possess a rich vocabulary, here on the wild world of the web they are not worth much. How to proceed? You already know from previous articles that Brazilian culture is one that values and encourages informality. So when reading correspondence written by somebody from that country, you will most likely find lots of abbreviations and slang. It happens with all contemporary languages: due to space limitations and to save time, speakers create a set of…
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    Dado Que - Latest Content

  • Notes from ¿Qué tal? - Forms of this/these

    20 Sep 2014 | 9:00 am
    The demonstrative adjective this/these has four forms in Spanish. Learn to recognize them when you see them. este coche – this car estos coches – these cars esta casa – this house estas casas – these houses You have already seen the neuter demonstrative esto. It refers to something that is as yet unidentified: ¿Que es esto? Author(s): Thalia Dorwick, Ana María Pérez-Gironés, Marty Knorre, William R. Glass and Hildebrando Villarreal Source(s): McGraw-Hill, Inc.
 
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    JLPT Boot Camp - The Ultimate Study Guide to passing the Japanese Language Proficiency Test

  • JLPT N5 Grammar: Telling Time and Using Counters in Japanese

    Clayton MacKnight
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:33 pm
    This month, we are going to be learning about how to tell time of the day as well as days of the month.  We will also go over how to use the major counter words in Japanese.  Do you know what the native Japanese numbers are?  How do you talk about quantities in Japanese?  I go over all that and more in the video below: For more videos like this one, be sure to subscribe to the JLPT N5 Grammar YouTube Channel Or check out some of the other N5 grammar videos: Japanese adjectives Japanese adjectives – past tense Japanese adjectives – polite past tense Japanese particle wa…
  • JLPT BC 144 | The Top 5 People that Stay in Japan

    Clayton MacKnight
    10 Sep 2014 | 7:16 am
    For a lot of people, living abroad is a temporary thing. Most come for a year or two to work, or to go to school.  Then, they hightail it back to their home countries to start their ‘real’ lives.  Or some family emergency pops up, and they hop a plane home.  Or some simply freak out over a giant earthquake and decide Japan isn’t their cup of tea anymore. Whatever the reason, the average time spent living abroad tends to be fairly limited for the average Joe.  But, there are occasionally those crazy fools among them that stay behind for whatever reason.  Here in Japan,…
  • JLPT Study Guide Month 8

    Clayton MacKnight
    3 Sep 2014 | 3:27 am
    This is a continuing series going over a sample JLPT study guide. If you are just joining the discussion, you might want to check out month 1, month 2, month 3, month 4, month 5, month 6 and month 7 before continuing. If you were lucky enough to take the July test this year, you have probably received your results by now, or are going to pretty soon. This will give you a good benchmark of what you will need to be studying for if you are taking the test in December. If you are retaking the exam, due to failing it this time around or to get a better score, you will have an excellent idea of…
  • July 2014 JLPT Results

    Clayton MacKnight
    26 Aug 2014 | 8:59 am
    Well, the results are in.  And I am a little embarrassed to say that I failed it, which I kind of expected.  What I didn’t expect was an absolute pounding.  This was my worst score yet on the test.  Even when I took it for the first time and hadn’t really started preparing for it at all, I did better than I did this last round.  And I am a bit perplexed as to why. I could chart it up to simply not being on my game that day or just getting a bunch of topics that I was not really all the familiar with for whatever reason, but I actually didn’t feel that bad about the…
  • JLPT BC 143 | More Fun More Reading

    Clayton MacKnight
    20 Aug 2014 | 9:34 am
    I’ve recently been really mixing up my studying to try to do some more things. I can never seem to keep my motivation up for passing the test between these lulls in action of between taking the test and getting the results back. So, I’ve turned to doing a lot more fun and interesting studying instead of day after day of drilling. For instance, I’ve started back playing Chrono Trigger (the Japanese version) as well as some other games in Japanese on my ride home. The main reason for this is I’ve been struggling to try to study after a long day of teaching and I…
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    Macmillan

  • Language and words in the news – 19th September, 2014

    Liz Potter
    19 Sep 2014 | 2:30 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link for us to include, or just add a comment to the post, with the link(s) you’d like to share. Language change and slang “Bae” Watch: The Ascent of a New Pet Name Never mind boo: it’s time to get ready for bae, the latest monosyllabic pet name…
  • Language tip of the week: forget

    Liz Potter
    18 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, etc. This week’s language tip helps with alternatives for the verb forget: have no recollection of something to be completely unable to remember something, so that you think that perhaps it never happened: I have absolutely no recollection of ever seeing this man. slip your mind if something slips your mind, you forget it because you are busy doing other…
  • Life skills tip of the week: ways of giving advice

    Liz Potter
    16 Sep 2014 | 7:00 am
    Learning about pragmatics and how to express yourself successfully is a useful life skill, said Michael Rundell in January when he introduced the new pragmatics series on Macmillan Dictionary. The series is part of the Macmillan Life Skills campaign, offering free resources for English language students and teachers each month. As part of the series, we’ll bring more useful content and tips from the Macmillan Dictionary on expressing yourself. This week’s language tip helps with ways of giving advice: You should/You ought to/If I were you/Why don’t you/It’s a good…
  • Can you twig it?

    Stan Carey
    15 Sep 2014 | 2:00 am
    Given how close Ireland and Britain are geographically, standard English has surprisingly few words that originated in Irish (less surprising when politics and social history are taken into account). Examples include banshee, galore, shamrock, and perhaps smithereens. Informal English has a few more, one of which may be twig, meaning ‘realise’ or ‘understand’. But its origins, as we’ll see, are murky. ‘Do you twig what I’m saying, or do I have to spell it out?’ wrote James Joyce in Dubliners. It serves as a nice example sentence for the verb: if you didn’t know what it…
  • Language and words in the news – 13th September, 2014

    Liz Potter
    13 Sep 2014 | 3:00 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link for us to include, or just add a comment to the post, with the link(s) you’d like to share. Language change and slang Apothecary When apothecary entered English in the mid-1300s, it had a more general meaning than “druggist.” Its late-Latin source,…
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    The Mezzofanti Guild

  • How Arabic Words Made It Into The Chinese Language

    Donovan Nagel
    19 Sep 2014 | 12:21 am
    Today’s guest post comes from accomplished polyglot Judith Meyer. She runs a blog called LearnLangs and was also the organizer for the Polyglot Conference in Berlin this year. As I mentioned recently on Facebook, Judith’s running a fundraising campaign at the moment to get help putting together a really impressive tool for learning Mandarin Chinese called LearnYu (if you ever wanted a Duolingo-esque tool for Mandarin then this might be what you’re after). The campaign still has just under 2 weeks left and I’m sure she’d really appreciate your support. Click here…
  • 11 Unmistakable Characteristics Of A Damn Good Language Learner

    Donovan Nagel
    11 Sep 2014 | 7:27 am
    Note: I’ve got some big announcements coming soon which I’ll only be sharing initially with mailing subscribers. If you’re interested then select the language you’re learning, enter your email and click ‘Join’ above (most previous sign-ups need to be done again unfortunately). Thanks! What makes a person a damn good language learner? Why do they seem to do really well at picking up foreign languages while other people don’t? Here you’ll find 11 unmistakable characteristics that define a damn good language learner and which determine the…
  • How To Improve Your Foreign Language Comprehension

    Donovan Nagel
    29 Aug 2014 | 8:35 pm
    Have you ever tried to converse with a native speaker of your target language but found that despite being able to speak pretty well you can barely catch a word of what he/she says? It’s not that they’re speaking too fast. They’re speaking normally. The problem is your listening comprehension skills need a lot of work. One of the most difficult parts about learning a new language is listening comprehension (being able to grasp and make sense of what you hear). You can be an excellent speaker and be able to read really well yet still not understand more than a fraction of…
  • How To Improve Language Fluency When You’re At A High Level

    Donovan Nagel
    26 Aug 2014 | 2:22 am
    I finally got a chance this week to meet and hang out with one of the fantastic Arabic teachers from italki here in Cairo. I gave her a t-shirt (courtesy of italki) and she gave me some fresh dates from her farm near Assuit in Upper Egypt. This is why I love learning languages and travel – making new and interesting friends all around the world. Most of us eventually hit learning plateaus. These are times where we feel like we’re not learning much anymore. Learning stops feeling like a rapid ascent and no matter how much study we do it seems like we’re getting nowhere. When…
  • How Safe Do I Feel Doing Language Immersion In Egypt Now?

    Donovan Nagel
    11 Aug 2014 | 7:50 am
    Leading up to my flight here I was getting the same reaction from almost everyone – is Egypt really safe for foreigners? Are you sure it’s wise to go there? I’m certainly no expert on Middle East politics but what I can do is tell you how I feel living here at the moment. First of all I don’t really feel any different now in 2014 than I did the first time I arrived here back in 2002. Let me say up front that Egypt is and always has been my favourite place to visit. The people here are some of the most hospitable and friendly that I’ve met anywhere in the world. I feel at home…
 
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    EVS Translations Blog

  • Atlas – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    19 Sep 2014 | 12:49 am
    The Greeks and their story telling has contributed a great deal to the development of mythology and has given a lot to the English language. What is not generally known is that the “classics” as we now know them were virtually unknown in England until the time of Shakespeare. With the desire for new knowledge, […] The post Atlas – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Caesar salad – Word of the day Eucalyptus – Word of the day Aromatherapy – Word of the day
  • 1st Annual Wine Reception

    evs2
    18 Sep 2014 | 6:17 am
    Ambience and Pure Enjoyment at the 1st Annual Wine Reception Hosted by EVS Translations USA in Atlanta As a special gesture of gratitude, EVS Translations USA  is inviting business partners and friends to its first annual wine reception, where they can spend some time and savor the fruit of the vine. The exclusive wine tasting […] The post 1st Annual Wine Reception appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: EVS Translations update: US expansion and Berlin makeover EVS Translations will be exhibiting at the Gastech exhibition EVS Translations will be exhibiting at the PETEX…
  • Dreamcatcher – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    18 Sep 2014 | 12:01 am
    The dreamcatcher is a traditional Native American charm which is widely available nowadays. Perhaps some of our readers have a dreamcatcher hanging above their beds, as an interior decoration – maybe even believing in the charm's supernatural powers. These charms are sometimes produced with natural feathers, beads, leather or other cheaper materials, and sold by […] The post Dreamcatcher – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Caesar salad – Word of the day Eucalyptus – Word of the day Aromatherapy – Word of the day
  • Panic – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    17 Sep 2014 | 4:14 am
    Greek mythology has given a lot to the English language. However, virtually no one in England had ever read these myths until 1600. Up until this time, the key work of literature which fed the English language was the Bible. With the Renaissance, however, came renewed interest in the classics and this subsequently lead to […] The post Panic – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Satsuma – Word of the day Serendipity – Word of the day Utopia – Word of the day
  • Kotatsu – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:11 am
    The kotatsu is the name of a wonderful piece of furniture found in many Japanese homes, though perhaps more common in houses now rather than smaller city apartments. It is a square shaped low level table – almost like a large coffee table – that the family sits around using thin cushions placed on the […] The post Kotatsu – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Jacuzzi – Word of the day G-spot – Word of the day Gobbledegook – Word of the day
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    Speaking Latino

  • Parallel Text Reading: 15 Side by Side Books in Spanish and English

    Diana Caballero
    20 Sep 2014 | 5:40 am
    The Everyday Language Learner blog defines parallel text as a resource for learning another language in the form of “a book or text in which the target language and native language are presented side by side on the same page or screen.” Many language learners will use this technique during the study process. I encourage you to read this blog entry that gives some tips and ideas for beginners, intermediate… Read More >The post Parallel Text Reading: 15 Side by Side Books in Spanish and English appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • Review: Become Fluent In Any Language By Gabriel Wyner – Creative Live

    Jared Romey
    8 Sep 2014 | 11:20 am
    This article is an in-depth review of the Creative Live video course Become Fluent In Any Language by Gabriel Wyner, author of the book Fluent Forever. Read More >The post Review: Become Fluent In Any Language By Gabriel Wyner – Creative Live appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • Everyday Mexican Spanish Phrases: Video Featuring ZMG4U Channel

    Diana Caballero
    6 Sep 2014 | 7:11 am
    A video that features an extended version of the popular Mexican Spanish phrases list “El Mexicano No…” by the ZMG4U channel with no vulgar words. Read More >The post Everyday Mexican Spanish Phrases: Video Featuring ZMG4U Channel appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • The Most Popular Spanish-English Flash Cards

    Diana Caballero
    1 Sep 2014 | 2:18 pm
    A list of 18 Spanish flashcards that are commonly used by language learners. Options for adults and kids. Bilingual and with pictures. Read More >The post The Most Popular Spanish-English Flash Cards appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • “Más… que…” Exaggerated Comparisons in Spanish: Sayings and Illustrations

    Diana Caballero
    29 Aug 2014 | 4:54 am
    A total of 22 illustrations of exaggerated comparisons in Spanish. Meaning and translations of all these funny Spanish sayings are included. Read More >The post “Más… que…” Exaggerated Comparisons in Spanish: Sayings and Illustrations appeared first on Speaking Latino.
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    Translation Source

  • Translation vs. Localization: Fast Facts

    Camilo
    12 Sep 2014 | 12:29 pm
    Thanks to the internet, our world is now connected more than ever before. It’s not only information and ideas that are being shared from all corners of the globe, but products and services as well. With seventy percent of all internet users surfing the net in a language other than English, translation and localization of your company or product is the best way to make the most of today’s global marketplace. To help you determine whether translation or localization will best meet your needs, we’ve compiled some fast facts about each service.   Localization Localized content is not…
  • Camilo Muñoz named President of the Association of Language Companies (ALC)

    Camilo
    9 Sep 2014 | 1:35 pm
    For Immediate Release: Translation Source is proud to announce that Camilo Muñoz, founder and CEO, has been elected President of the Association of Language Companies (ALC).  Mr. Muñoz served previously as Vice President of the Association of Language Companies, from 2012 to 2014, and feels honored to have been chosen for this new leadership role. Mr. Muñoz holds an MBA from the Wharton School of Business and is considered a thought-leader of the language industry. Under the direction of Mr. Muñoz, Translation Source has been named a Houston Fast 100 Company, a Hispanic Business 500…
  • When English Isn’t Enough: the Growing Importance of Bilingual Staffing

    Camilo
    11 Aug 2014 | 9:10 am
    English is the most widely studied second language worldwide; it’s the language of business, commerce and travel. Many companies, however, are discovering that to compete in today’s marketplace, English isn’t enough. With growing linguistic diversity in the U.S. and increased globalization of U.S. businesses, bilingual staffing has shifted from novelty to necessity, both at home and abroad. Bilingual Staffing at Home According to the latest U.S. Census over 60 million Americans speak a language other than English in their homes. In order to be competitive, especially in major metro…
  • E-learning Localization: How Storyline can help optimize your e-learning localization effort

    Camilo
    6 Aug 2014 | 12:05 pm
    E-learning localization becomes increasingly important as globalization pushes companies into uncharted territories and workers must be trained across linguistic and cultural barriers. The success or failure of an e-learning localization project hinges on the program chosen to get the job done. Articulate Storyline is the top e-learning program on the market. To help explain why Storyline is the program preferred by industry leaders such as Translation Source, take a look at 7 ways Storyline can help optimize your e-learning localization effort. 1. Intuitive Interface Storyline’s intuitive…
  • Localization and Dialects: How to Avoid Missteps in Translation

    Camilo
    4 Aug 2014 | 7:53 am
    Careful localization of translation services is crucial to the success of an international product launch.  Companies like Nokia, Kraft, and Apple all learned this the hard way when their products hit the global market with a name was unintentionally vulgar in a specific dialect.  To help avoid embarrassing gaffes and ensure that your message is received as you intended, we’ve compiled a list of 6 important considerations for localization across dialects. 1. Go Beyond Translation A well-known case of translation gone awry is that of Uzbekistan Airlines. Their English language marketing…
 
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    Blog at Fluent Language Tuition

  • No Lessons Required: How An American Girl Learnt a New Language (Hint: It's Called "British")

    Kerstin Hammes
    19 Sep 2014 | 1:35 am
    Hey everyone, today's I'm very excited to welcome a second guest post from Alice Morell. She writes about the world of music over at  http://mymusicbox.org, and you can also find her on Twitter. But today, Alice is on Fluent to share her own foreign language experience, which might be a little different from what you'd imagine.Over to Alice.. I'd spent a fair share of my free time over my teenage years studying the English culture, being especially engrossed in its literature and the romanticism of the Victorian Era. What can I say—though I quite love literature and many other…
  • How to Hack Language Like a Lumberjack (or: What's Your Hacking Hobby?)

    Kerstin Hammes
    15 Sep 2014 | 5:36 am
    As a linguist it's not part of my job to criticize and begrudge the evolving use of language. When words like "selfie" enter the dictionary and half the country of Britain starts calling things awesome, I'm right there. Both teaching and describing language are more about being aware of the words that we use every day and documenting how people communicate. And today I wanted to dive into the deeper meaning of a word that seems to have completely transformed its meaning over recent years. It's language-related, and learning-related too. And to me, it's become about mindset. I often find…
  • Field Report: Three Strategies You'll Wish You Knew When You Hit a Wall Learning a Foreign Language

    Kerstin Hammes
    10 Sep 2014 | 3:03 am
    Boy, have I got a useful guest post for you today! Cher Hale's language of choice is Italian - she's best described as a relationship counsellor between humans and the Italian language. Once they’ve fallen in love and the honeymoon period ends, she helps them stay committed until they’re conversational. You can read her vocabulary speed-dates, grammatical musings, and cultural cocktail party facts at The Iceberg Project or on Twitter @cherhale.In today's post, Cher is lending us a hand to help with the inevitable frustration that comes with the language learning journey. I…
  • Announcing How I'm Working to Combine My Three Passions

    Kerstin Hammes
    6 Sep 2014 | 11:54 am
    Today's blog post is an announcement, an open letter and something from the heart for everyone who follows the Fluent blog. I'm hoping to start a new chapter in my professional story. I will be announcing a few changes to Fluent Language, and introducing you to my new venture.First of all, I want to give you the quick history of how far Fluent has come since its start in 2012. When I first launched this website, my first steps into offering lessons (without a teaching certificate!), I was absolutely delighted at finding the blogging platform I have. I was not setting out to take over the…
  • Letters to Kerstin: German Book Recommendations and Spanish for Beginners

    Kerstin Hammes
    4 Sep 2014 | 7:56 am
    Recently, I've received a few messages from friends and readers asking me to recommend a few books to them. I imagine book fever is with you after enjoying the Fluent Guides (right?) so I'm more than happy to oblige. In fact, I would love to answer more of your questions here on the blog. If you have a question, submit it to jenny@fluentlanguage.co.uk and note that it's for the blog - I will select the questions and reply to you soon. German Books - Not Grammar Books!Dear KerstinWhat books would you recomend in German?  I do not mean Grammar books. I find that most Germans do not even…
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    The Expect Labs Blog

  • Thank you to everyone who connected with us at DataWeek + API...

    19 Sep 2014 | 8:57 am
    Thank you to everyone who connected with us at DataWeek + API World! We had a blast showing off our voice search chops to the crowd. Relive the magic with us in the pics above! If you missed the event, check out our movie assistant demo for yourself right here.
  • Remember the game that made weird robotic noises as it taught...

    18 Sep 2014 | 8:47 am
    Remember the game that made weird robotic noises as it taught you how to spell? Turns out it was not just a toy after all. Learn more about Speak & Spell’s impact on speech recognition in our fifth tech fact installment: Tech Fact #5: In 1978, Texas Instruments came out with Speak & Spell, an educational toy that was the first commercial product to use Digital Signal Processing. Speak & Spell marked the first time that “the human vocal tract [was] electronically duplicated on a single chip of silicon,” says TI.
  • Expect Labs Heads to Seoul! Developing Context-Aware Applications at DEVIEW 2014

    17 Sep 2014 | 9:14 am
    With keyboards slowly vanishing from our devices, context and voice are becoming the answer to...
  • "A computer terminal is not some clunky old television with a...

    15 Sep 2014 | 9:04 am
    "A computer terminal is not some clunky old television with a typewriter in front of it. It is an interface where the mind and body can connect with the universe and move bits of it about." — Douglas Adams, 1992 Douglas Adams was a British writer best known for his satirical science fiction series, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, which turned into an international cult sensation. Adams’ philosophical themes and esoteric humor catapulted the books to fame, selling over 15 million copies worldwide. The quote above is from Mostly Harmless, the last book in the series.
  • How is Archie related to an important milestone in search...

    11 Sep 2014 | 8:54 am
    How is Archie related to an important milestone in search history? Decipher the connection in our latest tech fact: Tech Fact #4: The very first search engine was created in 1990 by McGill University student, Alan Emtage. Orginally called “archives,” it was shortened to “Archie” in order to comply with UNIX naming conventions. Keep an eye out for more tech trivia next week!
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    Lingos Blog

  • Which language is most spoken as a second language around the world?

    Emma
    29 Aug 2014 | 2:16 am
    Many years after Queen Victoria completed the work started by many of her ancestors including Queen Elizabeth ( what is it about English Queens?!) the signs that English is thriving are extremely strong. Recent research carried out by movehub.com found that English is far and away the most spoken second language. English is spoken by the most people as a second language in 55 countries around the world. Second is French with 14 countries and third Russian in 13 countries:   Thanks to movehub.com for a great infographic showing which language is most spoken as a second language around the…
  • Learn a language from September 2014

    Emma
    14 Aug 2014 | 3:29 am
    September .. the beginning of a new year for those with children returning to school! And from this September it will be compulsory for all children aged 7 and above, i.e. from Year 2, to learn a second language at school in the UK. This new policy reflects growing concern about the lack of emphasis on learning a second language within british culture and the dwindling number of students choosing to study languages at GCSE, A-Level and University level. The UK’s miserable performance in second language acquisition ( the worst in Europe) is in turn is costing the UK economy millions of…
  • 30 Things British People say and what we actually mean!!

    Emma
    4 Aug 2014 | 2:48 am
    Navigating the literal sense of a language you are learning and the ACTUAL meaning somebody is trying to convey can be difficult, none more so than in English. Let us know which of the following you think is true! Thanks to: https://twitter.com/SoVeryBritish The Very British Problems book is out now on Amazon and at Waterstones.   The post 30 Things British People say and what we actually mean!! appeared first on Lingos Blog.
  • 4 ways to boost your language learning in the Summer Holidays

    Emma
    30 Jul 2014 | 4:31 am
      Hurrah! Summer is well and truly here! Summer is a time to take a break from the usual churn of daily life. We feel more energised by the sun, the days are longer giving us a greater sense of freedom .. whether it’s time off work or school summer holidays we all feel like we have a little more time to do the things we enjoy. So, if learning a language is something which floats your boat, how can you boost your language learning in the summer holidays?   Option 1: Visit a Country – where the language you are learning is spoken. The summer break allows us a little more…
  • Languages and the World Cup 2014

    Emma
    20 Jun 2014 | 6:10 am
    Love it or loathe it the World Cup is here and will be dominating newspapers, tv and social media sites around the world for the next few weeks. So why not join in and use the World Cup as a language learning opportunity?! The Official languages of the World Cup or FIFA, the institution which organises the event, are: English, French, German and Spanish. FIFA was founded in May 1904. FIFA headquarters is based in Zurich, Switzerland and their motto is: For the Game. For the World. Below we have listed the words for Football, World Cup and the various World Cup slogans of each of the 32…
 
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    Smoke & Croak

  • Cultural Consideration in Landing Page Design

    Liam Curley
    4 Sep 2014 | 3:59 am
    The term ‘website localisation’ is often used interchangeably with ‘website translation’. However, whilst translating an existing piece of content from one language to another allows you to communicate with a new audience, you can’t expect that same web page to draw an identical response from two users with different cultural backgrounds. No two cultures are the same, and our personal experiences and biases influence the way that we receive any brand or content. An identical web page for an ecommerce site will not deliver identical conversion rates from users in Brazil and France if…
  • Offering Free Delivery to International Customers

    Liam Curley
    4 Aug 2014 | 6:39 am
    A great deal has been written regarding the expectations that e-consumers have regarding delivery charges. Free delivery options have been rolled out on mass by large online retailers and small retailers have followed suit in order to remain competitive. Research conducted (with US respondents) by ComScore in December 2011 showed that 36% of consumers wouldn’t consider purchasing an item if they were required to pay delivery and a further 42% actively seek out retailers offering free delivery. Further research found that after product price, shipping charges were the most important element…
  • Q&A – Managing Currencies in International E-commerce

    Liam Curley
    8 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    I recently caught up with Neil Seymour, managing director of Challenge Trophies (@SportsTrophies). During the past four years, Challenge Trophies have been expanding their e-commerce business into Europe and Neil agreed to offer some valuable insight into the challenges of managing multiple currencies on an e-commerce website. 1. Tell us a bit about you and Challenge Trophies Challenge Trophies was founded in 1976, a family business originally set up as a retail outlet selling trophies, medals and awards to the local community. As Challenge Trophies evolved, we worked with increasing numbers…
  • 3 Minute Read – Translating your Slogan?

    Liam Curley
    16 Jun 2014 | 2:06 am
    3 Key points addressed: When should you translate your tagline When you can avoid translation How to manage a slogan translation Why do you have a Tagline? The title refers to slogans, but I prefer the term tagline. We’re talking about the line of text below your logo, on your literature and website. Before deciding on whether to translate the tagline for new markets, ask yourself why you have the tagline. What purpose does it serve? There are two types of tagline: The Abstract – this represents and conveys the brand values through a memorable and simple message. Take McDonalds’; I’m…
  • What Makes Google Tick?

    Liam Curley
    2 Jun 2014 | 4:25 am
    Want to improve your website’s ranking performance on Google? Before you build an understanding of the technical aspects of Search Engine Optimisation (SEO), or spend hours trying to find SEO blogs offering a magic ranking formula to crack the Google code (this doesn’t exist by the way), it’s worth trying to understand the core structure behind Google’s success. Billions of people use Google’s free search engine service to find high quality websites which are relevant to the type of content they’re looking for. Because Google has so many people spending time on their search…
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