Linguistics

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  • Cartoon: Five-a-Day

    The English Blog
    Jeffrey Hill
    29 Jul 2014 | 10:45 pm
    BACKGROUND New research backs the five-a-day target for fruit and vegetables, but suggests eating more may have no added benefits. An analysis of 16 worldwide studies suggested that for every portion of fruit and vegetables consumed, there was a lower risk of premature death. But after five portions a day, there was no further impact, researchers report in The BMJ. There have been calls to up the quota to seven-a-day, to prolong lives. Current NHS guidance is to eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. Most people manage about four. Read more >> CARTOONThe cartoon by…
  • Help your infant or toddler cope with stressful events

    Language Acquisition News -- ScienceDaily
    29 Jul 2014 | 8:51 am
    18-month-old “Karla” was playing on the slide at the park in her neighborhood, her mother sitting on a nearby bench chatting with her friend. A loud screech was followed by a crash and the sound of car alarms going off. In a flash, Karla was swept into her mother’s arms and both were shaking as they saw people running and heard sirens coming toward the scene of a car crash in the street next to the park.
  • A Different Julep

    A Way with Words
    grantbarrett
    12 Jul 2014 | 8:51 am
    The word julep, from Persian terms meaning “rose water,” usually refers to a mint-and-bourbon alcoholic beverage with a kick as strong as a Kentucky Derby winner. But one family from North Carolina has a sauce they call julep: a half-empty bottle of ketchup mixed with apple cider vinegar. We’ve never heard of such a thing — have you? This is part of a complete episode.
  • The state of the machine translation art

    Language Log
    Geoffrey K. Pullum
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:17 am
    I don't know any Hebrew. So when I recently saw a comment in Hebrew on a Google Plus page of discussion about Gaza tunnel-building that I was looking at, I clicked (with some forebodings) on the "Translate" link to see what it meant. What I got was this: Some grazing has hurt they Stands citizens Susan Hammer year This does not even offer enough of an inkling to permit me to guess at what the writer of the original Hebrew might have been saying. It might as well have said "Grill tree ecumenical the fox Shove sample Quentin Garage plastic." Linguists generally tend to argue that machine…
  • ET Vs 3.7; TLE 736

    Paleoglot
    18 Jul 2014 | 6:42 pm
    Tn turce Vel Sveitus. This was given by Vel Sveitu. (figurine of a priest; Volsinii; 4th century BCE)
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    Language Acquisition News -- ScienceDaily

  • Help your infant or toddler cope with stressful events

    29 Jul 2014 | 8:51 am
    18-month-old “Karla” was playing on the slide at the park in her neighborhood, her mother sitting on a nearby bench chatting with her friend. A loud screech was followed by a crash and the sound of car alarms going off. In a flash, Karla was swept into her mother’s arms and both were shaking as they saw people running and heard sirens coming toward the scene of a car crash in the street next to the park.
  • Children with disabilities benefit from classroom inclusion

    28 Jul 2014 | 7:45 am
    The secret to boosting the language skills of preschoolers with disabilities may be to put them in classrooms with typically developing peers, a new study finds.
  • Physicists create tool to foresee language destruction impact and thus prevent it

    25 Jul 2014 | 5:03 am
    Researchers defined parameters that estimate the speed of regression of a native language when replaced by one of its neighboring languages. The study focused on the case of Welsh. In a wider context, this type of model could be applied to other examples of cultural changes in which the more favorable traits expand and abolish the predominance of a native cultural trait.
  • Essays in English yield information about other languages

    23 Jul 2014 | 8:13 am
    Grammatical habits in written English reveal linguistic features of non-native speakers' languages, researchers report. The work could enable computers chewing through relatively accessible documents to approximate data that might take trained linguists months in the field to collect. But that data could in turn lead to better computational tools.
  • Try, try again? Study says no: Trying harder makes it more difficult to learn some aspects of language, neuroscientists find

    21 Jul 2014 | 11:22 am
    Neuroscientists find that trying harder makes it more difficult to learn some aspects of language. When it comes to learning languages, adults and children have different strengths. Adults excel at absorbing the vocabulary needed to navigate a grocery store or order food in a restaurant, but children have an uncanny ability to pick up on subtle nuances of language, sometimes speaking a second language like a native speaker within months. Brain structure plays an important role in this "sensitive period" for learning language, which is believed to end around adolescence.
 
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    The English Blog

  • Cartoon: Driverless Cars

    Jeffrey Hill
    30 Jul 2014 | 10:45 pm
    BACKGROUNDDriverless cars will take to the road in the UK from next year, the Government has announced. Guided by a system of sensors and cameras, the motors will take to the public highway in January for a series of trials set to last up to 36 months. UK cities can now bid for a share of a £10 million competition to host the trials, with up to three cities being selected. Read more >> CARTOONThe cartoon by Paul Thomas from the Daily Express shows the Queen and Prince Philip in a driverless royal limousine going past the gates of Buckingham Palace. The crowd are waving Union Jack…
  • Newsy Video: U.K. To Allow Driverless Cars On Public Roads

    Jeffrey Hill
    30 Jul 2014 | 10:14 pm
    Imagine reading the paper, doing a crossword puzzle or even taking a nap while your car drove you to work by itself. For U.K. citizens, that may soon be a reality. The government says it is going to allow driverless cars on public roads. Currently, these vehicles are just allowed on private roads. The cars will be introduced to just a few cities next year in a sort of test run. Full transcript >> Related articlesU.K. to allow driverless cars on public roadsDriverless cars to hit UK roads next yearDriverless cars allowed on UK public roads next yearDriverless Cars...The Future is Already…
  • Words in the News: Baggage

    Jeffrey Hill
    30 Jul 2014 | 10:06 pm
    Holidaymakers face flying without their luggage on one of the busiest weekends of the year as baggage handlers suffer a critical shortage of staff, airlines have warned. Travellers flying from Gatwick this weekend can expect chaotic scenes because Swissport, the baggage handling firm, does not have enough workers to load and unload planes. Full story >> VOCABULARYBaggage is an uncountable noun used for the suitcases, bags etc in which you carry your possessions when you travel. The usual British word is luggage although the people who work at airports are always referred to as baggage…
  • Cartoon: Five-a-Day

    Jeffrey Hill
    29 Jul 2014 | 10:45 pm
    BACKGROUND New research backs the five-a-day target for fruit and vegetables, but suggests eating more may have no added benefits. An analysis of 16 worldwide studies suggested that for every portion of fruit and vegetables consumed, there was a lower risk of premature death. But after five portions a day, there was no further impact, researchers report in The BMJ. There have been calls to up the quota to seven-a-day, to prolong lives. Current NHS guidance is to eat at least five portions of fruit and vegetables a day. Most people manage about four. Read more >> CARTOONThe cartoon by…
  • Newsy Video: Surgeon General Issues 'Call To Action' Against Tanning

    Jeffrey Hill
    29 Jul 2014 | 10:12 pm
    The nation's top medical official says a generation of bad tanning habits has led to a surge in the deadliest form of skin cancer. For the first time, acting U.S. Surgeon General Boris Lushniak released a "call to action" report Tuesday labeling skin cancer a "major health problem that requires immediate action." The report said overexposure to ultraviolet rays — whether outdoors or in a tanning salon — has lead to a 200 percent spike in melanoma-related deaths since 1973. The report also points out that every year in the U.S. nearly 5 million people are treated for some…
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    学校を出て働くことを考える

  • これは便利! 薬剤師の求人転職サイト比較

    admin
    13 Jul 2014 | 11:00 pm
    薬剤師と言う仕事は高度な専門性が求められる大切な仕事だと思います。薬剤師としてお勤めの方の中には、何かの事情で転職を考えている方もいると思います。ここでは、薬剤師の資格を持ち、転職を考えている方にはとても参考になる「薬剤師求人・転職サイト比較」をご紹介したいと思います。…
  • 企業で、そして学校で。たくさんのメリットがあるeラーニング。

    admin
    27 Aug 2013 | 11:00 pm
    近頃、eラーニングを取り入れる企業や学校が急増しているようです。いったいeラーニングには、どんなメリットがあるのでしょう? 企業研修にeラーニングを導入すると、時間、労力、経済と、すべての面において費用を抑えることができます。加えて、翌年もまたその次の年も、大勢の社員が同じ内容を学習することができ、内容に変更を加えることもまた、容易であるということです。…
  • 社員の力を引き出す人材管理ならサイダス【CYDAS】へ

    admin
    19 May 2013 | 11:00 pm
    そういった、企業における人材の配置計画や個人の持っている能力をふるにアップさせていくシステムを提供できるのが、人と組織の才能を引き出すサイダス【CYDAS】のPerformanceCloudです。 サイダス【CYDAS】をご紹介できるサイトは、こちらです。→こちら
 
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    Language Log

  • Homophonia

    Mark Liberman
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:25 am
    Paul Rolly, "Blogger fired from language school over 'homophonia'", The Salt Lake Tribune, 7:29/2014: Homophones, as any English grammarian can tell you, are words that sound the same but have different meanings and often different spellings — such as be and bee, through and threw, which and witch, their and there.   This concept is taught early on to foreign students learning English because it can be confusing to someone whose native language does not have that feature. But when the social-media specialist for a private Provo-based English language learning center wrote a blog explaining…
  • The state of the machine translation art

    Geoffrey K. Pullum
    31 Jul 2014 | 3:17 am
    I don't know any Hebrew. So when I recently saw a comment in Hebrew on a Google Plus page of discussion about Gaza tunnel-building that I was looking at, I clicked (with some forebodings) on the "Translate" link to see what it meant. What I got was this: Some grazing has hurt they Stands citizens Susan Hammer year This does not even offer enough of an inkling to permit me to guess at what the writer of the original Hebrew might have been saying. It might as well have said "Grill tree ecumenical the fox Shove sample Quentin Garage plastic." Linguists generally tend to argue that machine…
  • Transliteration follies

    Victor Mair
    30 Jul 2014 | 9:30 am
    From Arun Tharuvai, via his Twitter account, we find that Intersecting Bubbles has this brief but fascinating post on a multilingual notice:  "Shell Petroleum thinks that Hindi is English written in the Devanagari Script ". It describes a routine notification from Shell petroleum warning people not to dig where they might accidentally rupture a gas pipeline.  The warning was accompanied by this notice in twelve languages: If you would like this information in a language more suitable to you please send request to: The first version, in Hindi, is a disaster.  Here's how it is described: I…
  • Fillers: Autism, gender, and age

    Mark Liberman
    30 Jul 2014 | 3:24 am
    K. Gorman et al., "Children's Use of Disfluencies Distinguish ASD and Language Impairment", IMFAR 2014 (emphasis added): This study compares the relative frequencies of "uh" and "um" in the spontaneous speech of children with ASD (with or without comorbid language impairment) to two control groups. Methods: Participants: 112 children ages 3;10–9;0 participated: ASD (50), Specific Language Impairment (SLI;  18), and Typical Development (TD; 44). All diagnoses were verified by best-estimate clinical consensus. The children with ASD were split into two groups: one group with comorbid…
  • Foul Meat-gate

    Victor Mair
    29 Jul 2014 | 3:28 pm
    In "Dead and alive: metaphors for (dis)obeying the law " (7/27/14), we discussed the food scandal that has rocked China in recent days.  Abe Sauer had earlier made this post to the brandchannel:  "China's Latest Meat Scandal Could Deal a Death Blow to Brands Like KFC " (7/23/14).  In it, Abe remarked, "Taking a note from America's Watergate-based nomenclature, the scandal is being called 'Foul Meat-gate' ('臭肉门')."  Ben Zimmer, who called Abe's post to my attention, asked, "Is '-gate' really working as a morpheme here?" The answer is a resounding "yes". From this Wikipedia article,…
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    GoodWord from alphaDictionary.com

  • 7/31/14 - tawdry

    30 Jul 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. Cheap, showy and pretentious as tawdry clothes. 2. Shameful, indecent, as tawdry behavior.
  • 7/30/14 - politic

    29 Jul 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. (Adjective) Artfully prudent, sensibly judicious, subtly smart, skillfully and politely shrewd. 2. (Adjective) Scheming, crafty, unscrupulously cunning. 3. (Verb) Engage in political activity.
  • 7/29/14 - suzerain

    28 Jul 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. A state or sovereign that has control of political and international affairs of a vassal state, while allowing it control over its domestic policy. 2. A feudal overlord to whom vassals must pay a tribute.
  • 7/28/14 - pelf

    27 Jul 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. Money, riches, especially if ill-gotten. 2. Trash, rubbish, DETRITUS, dust.
  • 7/27/14 - consort

    26 Jul 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. A husband or wife, a spouse; used in conjunction with some titles, such as Queen Consort, the wife of a king, King Consort, the husband of a queen. Prince Albert, the consort of Queen Victoria, was known as the Prince Consort. 2. A company of musicians specializing in the performance of music from an earlier era, as a baroque music consort. 3. A ship sailing in company with another.
 
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    Paleoglot

  • ET Vs 3.7; TLE 736

    18 Jul 2014 | 6:42 pm
    Tn turce Vel Sveitus. This was given by Vel Sveitu. (figurine of a priest; Volsinii; 4th century BCE)
  • ET Vs 4.8; TLE 900

    13 Jul 2014 | 6:01 pm
    Selvans Sanχune-ta cvera. Silvanus of the Oath with votive. (cippus; Volsinii; 3rd to 2nd century BCE)
  • CII 307; ET Vt G.1; TLE 405

    4 Jul 2014 | 5:30 pm
    natis haruspex (Etruscan gem showing a haruspex examining a liver; Volaterrae; 4th century BCE)
  • The Pesaro bilingual inscription (ET Um 1.7; TLE 697)

    29 Jun 2014 | 3:45 pm
    Latin: L. Cafatius., L. f., Ste. Haruspex fulguriator. Lars Cafatius, son of Lars, of the Stellatina. Haruspex (and) augur of lightning. Etruscan: Cafates Lr., Lr. Netśvis, trutnvt, frontac. Larth Cafatie, (son of) Larth. Haruspex, libator, (and) augur of lightning. (Etruscan-Latin stone epitaph; Umbria; 1st century BCE)
  • The history of the translation of Etruscan cvil

    24 Jan 2014 | 5:55 pm
    I've been not only logging in my translations of each word into my Etruscan database but also the history of each word's translations by various authors. Sometimes there is little consensus in what a word means, sometimes there is unanimity across the board. I even record translations offered by Albanian-obsessed Zachary Mayani because even though I may feel he is of zero worth in Etruscan
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    Fritinancy

  • Siri, Tell Me the Name of the Advertiser

    Nancy Friedman
    30 Jul 2014 | 6:00 am
    You’re cruising along at 25 mph in Oakland when you glimpse a billboard across the street. You see it for about two seconds, across three lanes of traffic, before you drive by. What registers? What’s being advertised? “Siri, find me a place above 50°.” Broadway near 51st Street. I’ll tell you what I saw: an ad for Siri, the iPhone voice app. Or maybe, on second thought, an ad for kayaks. In, I dunno, Alaska. It wasn’t until a third and slower drive-by that I caught the much smaller type in the lower right-hand corner: “Real summer. Real close.” And beneath that line, in even…
  • Word of the Week: Belittle

    Nancy Friedman
    28 Jul 2014 | 7:55 am
    Belittle: To make small; to disparage; to scorn as worthless. From our vantage point in the second decade of the twenty-first century, it’s hard to fathom that belittle was once reviled as vulgar and—as late as 1926, in Fowler’s Dictionary of Modern English Usage—“an undesirable alien.” Such, however, is the well-documented case, as Ammon Shea enlightens us in his eminently readable new book, Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation (Perigee).* Belittle—like ain’t, enormity, split infinitives, and sentence-ending prepositions—is one of those language “mistakes”…
  • The Sanity Defense

    Nancy Friedman
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:10 am
    Twenty-four-hour classical-music radio stations are a dwindling breed, hit hard by competition from online music-streaming services like Pandora and by the stark realities of a graying audience. All the more reason to cheer a healthy and good-humored survivor. “Sanity Now!” KDFC outdoor ad, San Francisco. Love the script typeface. Perhaps your first association, like mine, was the Seinfeldian rallying cry, “Serenity now!” But KDFC has an independent claim on the slogan. The station, which was founded in 1946 and has stuck to classical programming ever since, has had five owners during…
  • Ad Absurdum

    Nancy Friedman
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:46 am
    Some days I question my ability to distinguish satire from sincerity. “Gluten free flooring” from Heritage Salvage. San Francisco Chronicle, July 12. In a world where gluten-free shampoo is a real thing*, who knows? Because grain elevators, people! __ * Tip: Keep your mouth closed when you wash your hair. And don’t lick the floorboards.
  • Guest Post at Duets Blog: Fly the Tasty Skies

    Nancy Friedman
    22 Jul 2014 | 9:12 am
    Today I’m guest-blogging at Duets Blog, a publication of Minneapolis trademark-law firm Winthrop & Winestine. My post, “Fly the Tasty Skies,” looks at new airline names borrowed from the produce aisle. JetBlue’s new Mint, which began operations last month, is just the latest entrant in a category that includes Peach, Mango, Vanilla, and Spice. The trend carries over to bank names, too—would you prefer a Tangerine or a Tomato? Jet over to Duets Blog, read the post, and leave a comment if you like.
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    languagehat.com

  • Incomprehensibility.

    languagehat
    31 Jul 2014 | 7:25 am
    Barry Mazur’s Berfrois essay “The Authority of the Incomprehensible” has a long middle section on the reprehensible use of mathematics as a rhetorical device to give unearned authority to a text, with a detailed discussion of Malthus; all this can be skipped unless you have a particular interest in it. What attracted me to the essay is apparent in its opening: You may not know what Abracadabra means, but you very well feel its magical force, and its effect only gains from the obscurity of the incantation. It is true, of course, that ipsa scientia potestas est (“knowledge…
  • Sut.

    languagehat
    30 Jul 2014 | 3:14 pm
    Olga Khazan has an amusing account in The Atlantic of going to Russia and trying to use her very rusty native language. I enjoyed it, of course, but one section requires amendment, since she doesn’t seem to have quite understood what was going on: We’re sitting in a cafe with my cousin, who has lived in Leningrad/Saint Petersburg her entire life. She is offering Rich more food. He says, “I’m full” in English, and I try to teach him the words for “I’m full” in Russian, because I enjoy feeling smarter than others. “Sut,” I say—full—remembering a word from childhood…
  • Teaser.

    languagehat
    29 Jul 2014 | 6:37 am
    George Walkden has posted “Syntactic Reconstruction and Proto-Germanic: Cinematic Teaser” on Facebook; you can also view it at Mark Liberman’s Log post, and I urge you to take the two minutes needed to watch this brilliant attempt to attract attention to what might seem (and in fact is) a recondite subject. From the Log comments, I have to agree with Yuval, who said “How, HOW, did he miss the (rated) PG pun?” and with Matt‘s complaint about the price (“maybe someone at OUP will decide to ride this towering wave of publicity by offering a pre-order…
  • Yei Bohu.

    languagehat
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:06 pm
    Alexander Anichkin, who comments here as Sashura, has a funny post about some language used by Russia’s Ministry of Foreign Affairs that is both undiplomatic and untranslatable, namely that the EU, in supporting the US, “played the role of the well-known ‘under-officer’s widow,’ who flogged herself” (выступил в роли небезызвестной “унтер-офицерской вдовы”, которая сама себя высекла). For one thing, the word унтер-офицер [unter-ofitser], which I have rendered as the…
  • Confidence Man.

    languagehat
    27 Jul 2014 | 11:34 am
    I’m reading July 1914: Countdown to War, by Sean McMeekin, having enjoyed his The Russian Origins of the First World War (see this post) and having read in R.J.W. Evans NYRB review that it was “almost impossible to put down” (and of course being prompted by the centenary aspect); I’m still on the Prologue, but I’ve already run into a linguistic conundrum. In describing the preparations of the Serbian conspirators, he writes “Chabrinovitch, with papers provided by Popovitch, was to cross the border en route for Zvornik, on the Bosnian side; from there…
 
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    A Way with Words

  • A Different Julep

    grantbarrett
    12 Jul 2014 | 8:51 am
    The word julep, from Persian terms meaning “rose water,” usually refers to a mint-and-bourbon alcoholic beverage with a kick as strong as a Kentucky Derby winner. But one family from North Carolina has a sauce they call julep: a half-empty bottle of ketchup mixed with apple cider vinegar. We’ve never heard of such a thing — have you? This is part of a complete episode.
  • “Lord Love a Duck” Origin

    grantbarrett
    12 Jul 2014 | 8:51 am
    The history of the exclamation Lord love a duck!is unclear, but it may be a euphemism for a rhyming curse word or for the mild oath For the love of Christ! This is part of a complete episode.
  • A Child Named Bodie

    grantbarrett
    12 Jul 2014 | 8:51 am
    In an earlier episode, we talked about regretting what you name your child, and we got a call from a mother who named her son Bodie and found that the name didn’t travel so well. In France, people thought his name was “Body.” This is part of a complete episode.
  • Origin of “Denim”

    grantbarrett
    12 Jul 2014 | 8:51 am
    The fabric called denim originated in the town of Nimes, France, hence the name. The fabric known as jean, originally from Genoa, Italy, was popular long before Levi Strauss and Jacob Davis and teamed up in 1873 to make durable work trousers using jean and duck cloth. This is part of a complete episode.
  • Bored for the Hollow Horn

    grantbarrett
    12 Jul 2014 | 8:51 am
    When someone says they should be bored for the hollow horn, it’s typically a lighthearted way of saying they should have their own head examined. The saying comes from an old supposed disease of cattle that made them dull and lethargic, and diagnosed by boring a hole in one of their horns. This is part of a complete episode.
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    Sinosplice » Life

  • The Beauty of Chinese Numbers

    John Pasden
    28 Jul 2014 | 6:28 pm
    The beauty of Chinese numbers is that they are consistent. You learn the rules, and they just work. Even if you try to get flippant and say for “10″ instead of just regular old , no one’s going to get upset. The consistent beauty of Chinese numbers is made all the more obvious by the relative skankiness of numbers in English. I noticed this because my daughter (now somewhere between 2½ and 3 years old) has pretty much mastered all the numbers to 100 in Chinese, but the teens in English continue to stump her. She can count to 20 no problem, but if you ask her to read a…
  • Clean Water in China?

    John Pasden
    23 Jul 2014 | 7:11 pm
    Last week AllSet Learning staff took a team-building trip to the mountains of Zhejiang in Tonglu County (). It was a nice trip, and one of the things that struck me most about the natural beauty there was the lack of litter and crystal-clear water. Anyone who has traveled much in China knows that it’s a beautiful, beautiful country, but disgracefully covered in litter in so many otherwise breath-taking tourist destinations. Not so in Tonglu! I was also surprised to learn that the locals there drink the water straight from the mountain streams without treating it at all. They don’t…
  • The 4th Ayi: Chinese Girls’ Nightmare

    John Pasden
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:52 pm
    We learners of Chinese typically learn that “ayi” () means “aunt,” and then soon after also learn that it is also a polite way to address “a woman of one’s mother’s generation.” Then, pretty soon after arriving in China, we learn that it’s also what you call the lady you hire to clean your home. (The last one tends to become the most familiar for foreigners living in China.) Today I’d like to bring up a fourth use of “ayi” which kind of circles back to the first one, but is also subtly different, and additionally…
  • Abstracted Characters

    John Pasden
    14 Jul 2014 | 5:45 pm
    Stylized letters and characters are interesting to me, but how abstract can you get with Chinese characters? You kinda have to retain the strokes and radicals and stuff, right? Maybe not… The characters represented above are . Although the name is readable, it might take a bit longer to decipher than most Chinese text, even for native speakers. Have you ever spotted characters that have been taken even further into the abstract?
  • Itchy Feet on Communication

    John Pasden
    8 Jul 2014 | 6:35 pm
    The webcomic Itchy Feet has some great comics on learning to communicate in a foreign language. I especially like his visualization technique for representing a low level of competency in a foreign language. These are about German and French, but could be about any language, really: This one will feel relevant to ABCs in China: Itchy Feet is also the comic that did this amusing take on various Asian scripts which went semi-viral a while ago:
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    AJATT | All Japanese All The Time

  • Why Everything You Do Wrong Is Right

    khatzumoto
    10 Jul 2014 | 11:59 pm
    You are not a screw-up. You are not lazy. You work hard. Too hard. At things that don’t matter. You work hard at struggling and self-blame and self-hate. You work hard at worrying. You work hard at pacing the floor. You work hard at imagining terrifying, low-probability contingencies. You work hard on trying to force yourself, like a stubborn camel, to do things you don’t want to do in a way you don’t want to do them. And it doesn’t work. It almost never works. So what do you do? USE EVEN MORE FORCE! You tell the whole world your goals, in order to force social…
  • What’s Wrong And Right With Vocabulary Lists — How To Use Them Without Being Used By Them

    khatzumoto
    5 Jul 2014 | 11:59 pm
    So I met a German girl at a cafe today…actually, she was Austrian but, same difference. Anyway, we got to talking about books and  I gave her a book recommendation, and it came out that I’ve only ever read the book in Japanese, so I had to find out what the English title was. She was shocked (or maybe surprised…whatever, same difference), and she talked about how she could never learn Japanese. And I was like, no way, of course you could. Because, here’s the thing. I have a lot of positive stereotypes about German people. There was my friend and neighbour Wolfgang…
  • How to Learn to Read L2 Newspapers Even Though You Suck Right Now and It Seems Impossible

    khatzumoto
    30 Jun 2014 | 11:59 pm
    Simple Version Get a newspaper written in your target language Pick out a headline Look up and learn any words you don’t know in the headline Stop for now Repeat from (1) tomorrow Detailed Version Get a newspaper — preferably a dead-tree one Pick out a headline (or an interesting-looking article, picture, caption, whatever) Google the headline Find the article online Look up and learn any words you don’t know in the headline Use the article for clues (meaning of abbreviations, etc. “Govt” = “Government”) if necessary. Create an MCD card containing the…
  • You’re not learning the language…

    khatzumoto
    25 Jun 2014 | 11:59 pm
    …You already know the language. It already belongs to you. You’re just maintaining your knowledge. You’re not struggling and there is no “there” to get to. You’re not a foreigner; you’re just a remedial native speaker who was functionally deaf (not enough hearing hours) and is now getting speech therapy.
  • Think Like An Aristocrat, Act Like A Builder

    khatzumoto
    20 Jun 2014 | 11:59 pm
     lay Lego bricks of fluency one at a time“Mallory is famously quoted as having replied to the question “Why do you want to climb Mount Everest?” with the retort “Because it’s there”” [George Mallory - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia] Growing up, I had the privilege of interacting with people from a wide range of social classes on a daily basis. I didn’t think too much of it at the time; I thought that’s just how the world worked. It was…well, it just seemed like it was what it was. But now I realize that what it was…was…
 
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    Tower of Confusion

  • Украинский кризис

    edwin
    25 Jul 2014 | 11:59 am
    (Original English version of what I am trying to say).
  • The Ukrainian Crisis

    edwin
    25 Jul 2014 | 11:57 am
    Early this year, I got hooked onto following the development on the Ukrainian crisis. I have been amazed on how much the Western and Russian media contradict each other. To my disappointment, most Western media are bias and not telling the truth. Not that the Russian media are doing any better, but at least there is not really a high expectation on them. The more I am interested in knowing the truth, the more time and energy I spend on digging them out. At one point, I was also interested in knowing what an average Ukrainian or Russian would think about the crisis. So one day I turned to a…
  • Introducing Langscript

    edwin
    5 Mar 2014 | 8:46 pm
    I have recently created a simple browser-based synchronized audio-text reader for language learning purposes. I have checked out some other synchronized audio-text readers available on the web, but none of them seems to have sentence-level synchronization and at the same time support multiple translations. Out of frustration, I wrote my own. LangScript synchronizes the audio and text at the sentence level, and it supports synchronization with multiple translations. It can display a single script/translation, or two translations side-by-side. You can click on any phrase on either side and the…
  • The Cost of French Tutoring

    edwin
    25 Jan 2014 | 7:52 am
    In the past few months, I had the chance to organize tutoring sessions for some French Immersion students, and had been contacting and interviewing a lot of French tutors. I was amazed to learn how expensive many of these tutors were charging. As a point of reference, the average tuition fee for an experienced English tutor with an Certification of Education would be about $20 per hour for a school-age child. How much would it be for French? A Quebecker recently obtained her Certification of Education and moved to Toronto offered me $25 per hour, and she insisted that I would be the one who…
  • Conversation Summary: Russian #5

    edwin
    20 Jan 2014 | 6:31 am
    A new year has begun (and half a month is already gone). This year, I have made a resolution to simply speak more. For one thing, I am going to do more conversations with online tutors. I also think it would be a good idea to write a mini-summary after each conversation, if possible. So here comes my fifth Russian conversion with a tutor, the first one in the year 2014. Date: 16 January, 2014 Duration: 22 minutes 44 seconds I have not spoken to Evgueny for a month. I actually took a 3-week break from all my language learning, including Russian. So I had a slow start trying to get back to the…
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    separated by a common language

  • America and Americans (p.s. England, Britain & UK!)

    lynneguist
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:54 am
    Here's an argument that doesn't fit well in 140 characters, but I'm constantly being confronted with it on Twitter (and in real life), so I hope you'll excuse me getting it out of my system so that I can just send people a link from now on.This is the kind of thing I get:I suggest you stop calling yourselves American. It is arrogant of people from the United States to call themselves Americans because America is a whole continentThey should be called [insert long-winded or whimsical epithet here].So, let's break that argument down...I suggest... It is arrogantIndividuals from the USA call…
  • anti-clockwise and counterclockwise

    lynneguist
    8 Jul 2014 | 4:33 pm
    I had to take/make a decision on how to hyphenate the title of this post--it could have beenanti-clockwise and counter-clockwiseanticlockwise and counter-clockwise            oranticlockwise and counterclockwisebut I went with (BrE) anti-clockwise and (AmE) counterclockwise because, as we've seen before, Americans are a bit more apt to close up prefixed words when given the chance to.  @jaynefox requested this one as a Twitter 'Difference of the Day', but since it's been a month since my last post (shock! horror! marking/grading!),…
  • 'the newspaper' and more on the written word

    lynneguist
    6 Jun 2014 | 2:48 pm
    Tonight (22:00/10pm) people in the UK (and maybe abroad?) will be able to hear a new instal(l)ment of The Verb "Radio 3's cabaret of the word". [It's downloadable for the next 7 days.]  I was invited to talk about a piece I'd written a few months ago about American attitudes to dictionaries and, by extension, the written word. And it was a lovely time. The other guests were Nathaniel Mann (with his collaborator, violinist Daniel Merrill) and Nicholson Baker, whose writing I've long admired (and who was contributing over the phone from Maine; as a friend of mine pointed out, I was on the…
  • Who is ruining/spoiling/destroying English?

    lynneguist
    30 May 2014 | 5:22 am
    This is NOT a serious post. Nothing here stands up to particularly good academic standards. But I just wasted some time in the corpus of Global Web-Based English (GloWBE) and thought I'd share this with you in order to make me feel better about the time-wastage.I wanted to see who blames whom for 'ruining English language, so I looked in GloBWE because it conveniently divides things into country categories like this:I looked for the verbs spoil, ruin and destroy (with -s, -ed/t, and -ing endings too) with the word language three words before or seven words after the verb. (I also tried it…
  • sandwiches, more particularly bacon sandwiches

    lynneguist
    27 May 2014 | 4:57 pm
    On Fridays, I sit and work in a cafe with a little group of writing friends, and I've got(ten) into the habit of ordering the same thing for lunch each week (just because it makes calorie-counting easier). Giving me what I've ordered has, alas, not become the habit of the (AmE) waitstaff. So, when my special order was agreed-to but not delivered at a new cafe, I grumpily posted the following on Facebook:To quote myself, from the previous toast post:Now, I endeavo(u)r to maintain a descriptive rather than prescriptive attitude toward(s) language on this blog, but I have no hesitation in being…
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    Mr. Verb

  • "Interested in regional and social differences in speech? We are too!"

    22 Jul 2014 | 8:14 am
    Just got an email with that subject line for a study about how people identify speakers of different dialects:Our research team at the University of Wisconsin is recruiting subjects for research on how people perceive and identify dialects of languages people speak. If you’d like to participate, just visit this link, and you’ll hear speech samples and can answer questions about them, e.g. where the speakers are from and whether you think they have strong accents.  The survey will not work on a smartphone; please only use a laptop, desktop, or tablet.If you have any questions…
  • Wisconsin Englishes update ...

    25 Jun 2014 | 12:53 pm
    Word on the street is that Wisconsin Englishes will be on Wisconsin Public Radio in western Wisconsin tomorrow, on Spectrum West with Al Ross.And the Wisconsin Englishes Project website has been spiffed up a little ... various updates and a bunch of teaching materials, etc. You can check it out here.
  • More on the origins of Yiddish

    24 Jun 2014 | 6:25 am
    Following up on the last post here's the link to the second piece from Tablet about the origins of Yiddish, "The Mystery of the Origins of Yiddish Will Never Be Solved: How an academic field—marked by petty fighting, misguided ideological debates, and personal proximity to tragedy—doomed itself" by Batya Ungar-Sargon. It features first-person accounts from a set of central figures and is worth a read, though my sense is that the state of things is hardly as bleak as it's made out to be ...
  • The Origins of Yiddish

    18 Jun 2014 | 6:29 am
    In keeping with our recent non-news news trend, reader cg passed along this link to a long article by Cherie Woodworth in Tablet on the origins of the Yiddish language yesterday. The piece is new to Tablet, but is a reprint from Kritika 2010. Worth reading.The controversy that the piece reviews is considerably older … where and how Yiddish came into existence as a language. That whole story is rich and amazing (the briefest and best starting point, I think, is in Neil Jacobs' Yiddish: A linguistic introduction (Oxford, 2005). The focus in this article is much narrower, contrasting Max…
  • Schwa Fire

    16 Jun 2014 | 5:19 am
    Trying to do actual work seems to be a higher priority than blogging these days for the many members of Team Verb, so we're taking a kind of Last Week Tonight approach, I suppose. The news of the launch of Schwa Fire is now old enough that it fits our bill, in fact.First, the bad news, which you know if you follow language journalism: it's a paid subscription. But it's pretty modest and individual articles are downright cheap.But the first issue was clearly worth the price, for me at least. Arika Okrent is one of my favorite popular writers in linguistics (up there with Ben Zimmer and Jan…
 
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    Learn French with daily podcasts

  • 1958 – Real Life French: livres dominos

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:53 pm
    Real life French Guide Welcome to your lesson of Real Life French. Each lesson we take a simple situation you may encounter in everyday life in France. Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :~
  • 1957 – Les gens du matin (Morning people)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:52 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Les “gens du matin” qui sont plus alertes tôt dans la journée, ont plus tendance à tromper et à agir de façon … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 1956 – Bateau espion (Spy ship)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:50 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript La Chine indique qu’elle a le droit d’envoyer un bateau de surveillance pour surveiller l’exercice … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 1955 – Hôpital à Gaza (Hospital in Gaza)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:47 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Au moins cinq personnes ont été tuées et 70 blessées par une attaque d’Israel sur un hôpital de Gaza… Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 1954 – Requin blanc (White shark)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    23 Jul 2014 | 9:44 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Un grand requin blanc qui s’est échoué sur une plage en Australie s’est peut-être étouffé avec un lion … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
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    Brave New Words

  • Market Research

    27 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Check out Verse Junkies, “an international journal dedicated to the study and practise of inter-semiotic translation - put simply translation across mediums”.
  • What Can You Study When You Do a PhD in Translation?

    22 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    I’m often contacted by people who are interested in doing a PhD in translation, but they want help coming up with ideas for topics. This is a bit odd, I suppose, because if you’re going to do research, you should have enthusiasm for your topic, which generally means there’s something that intrigues you that you want to devote three or more years of your life to.Nonetheless, here are some general, broad suggestions for topics/approaches for a PhD dissertation:--creative-critical (you do a translation and then write a critical commentary on it)--philosophy/ies of translation--the…
  • Tips for Translators

    17 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    English-to-Hebrew translator Gili Bar Hillel recently asked other translators, including me, for tips for new translators, which she then posted on her blog. Her original post was in Hebrew, but due to popular demand, she’s now put an English version up.
  • Round-Up of Articles

    12 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    It’s time for another round-up of interesting articles and other links.I love Oliver Burkeman’s weekly column in the Guardian (and his two books based on the column). A recent column was on writing. He notes: “It’s the writer and reader, side by side, scanning the landscape. The reader wants to see; your job is to do the pointing.”The New Yorker questions whether literature should be useful.The BBC notes that young people are lacking language skills. “The UK’s education system is failing to produce enough people with foreign-language skills to meet a growing need from business,…
  • Gulf Coast Translation Prize

    6 Jul 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Here is some information about a new translation prize you might be interested in submitting work for. Also see https://gulfcoastmag.org/contests/prize-in-translation for more details.We Are Now Accepting Entries For the Inaugural Gulf Coast Translation Prize! Deadline: August 31, 2014Gulf Coast is now accepting entries for the inaugural Gulf Coast Translation Prize. In 2014, the contest is open to poetry in translation. The winner receives $1,000 and publication in the journal. Two honorable mentions will also appear in issue 27.2, due out in April 2015. All entries will be considered…
 
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    Free Language

  • A Transparent Slovak Language Course: Learn Anytime with Online, Mobile, Interactive, Social and Software Tools

    travelinguist
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:36 pm
    Online Slovak Course For many languages such as Slovak, it is challenging to find enough free quality materials online to compromise a complete course. Even if you can bring together the materials, you have to craft a course on your own to cover all the bases. Enter Transparent Slovak, the fruits of a longstanding language education house focusing on the modern digital world of learning. It's not free but it's also not expensive, and is well worth the investment. More About Transparent Slovak Slovak Learned Items Refresh System Keep what you learned in the past fresh in your mind now. Byki™…
  • A Transparent Serbian Language Course: Learn Anytime with Online, Mobile, Interactive, Social and Software Tools

    travelinguist
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:34 pm
    Online Serbian Course For many languages such as Serbian, it is challenging to find enough free quality materials online to compromise a complete course. Even if you can bring together the materials, you have to craft a course on your own to cover all the bases. Enter Transparent Serbian, the fruits of a longstanding language education house focusing on the modern digital world of learning. It's not free but it's also not expensive, and is well worth the investment. More About Transparent Serbian Serbian Learned Items Refresh System Keep what you learned in the past fresh in your mind now.
  • A Transparent Russian Language Course: Learn Anytime with Online, Mobile, Interactive, Social and Software Tools

    travelinguist
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:32 pm
    Online Russian Course For many languages such as Russian, it is challenging to find enough free quality materials online to compromise a complete course. Even if you can bring together the materials, you have to craft a course on your own to cover all the bases. Enter Transparent Russian, the fruits of a longstanding language education house focusing on the modern digital world of learning. It's not free but it's also not expensive, and is well worth the investment. More About Transparent Russian Russian Learned Items Refresh System Keep what you learned in the past fresh in your mind now.
  • A Transparent European Portuguese Language Course: Learn Anytime with Online, Mobile, Interactive, Social and Software Tools

    travelinguist
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:26 pm
    Online European Portuguese Course For many languages such as European Portuguese, it is challenging to find enough free quality materials online to compromise a complete course. Even if you can bring together the materials, you have to craft a course on your own to cover all the bases. More About Transparent European Portuguese European Portuguese Learned Items Refresh System Keep what you learned in the past fresh in your mind now. Byki™ European Portuguese Vocabulary Builder and Pronunciation Trainer Learn more than what you need. Learn what you want. Byki contains thousands of useful…
  • A Transparent Brazilian Portuguese Language Course: Learn Anytime with Online, Mobile, Interactive, Social and Software Tools

    travelinguist
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:20 pm
    Online Brazilian Portuguese Course For many languages such as Brazilian Portuguese, it is challenging to find enough free quality materials online to compromise a complete course. Even if you can bring together the materials, you have to craft a course on your own to cover all the bases. More About Transparent Brazilian Portuguese Brazilian Portuguese Learned Items Refresh System Keep what you learned in the past fresh in your mind now. Byki™ Brazilian Portuguese Vocabulary Builder and Pronunciation Trainer Learn more than what you need. Learn what you want. Byki contains thousands of…
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    English, Jack

  • Proscribing, narrowly

    7 Jul 2014 | 5:24 am
    Over at the NYT, Alexander Nazaryan has a rather strident article about "The fallacy of balanced literacy." Therein, he writes, "balanced literacy is an especially irresponsible approach, given that New York State has adopted the federal Common Core standards, which skew toward a narrowly proscribed list of texts, many of them nonfiction." [Now changed to narrowly prescribed.]These texts are prescribed. That is, they're imposed, not declared unacceptable or invalid. Nevertheless, the Google Books corpus suggests narrowly proscribed is a new and growing phrase. So, I'm curious: was this…
  • Thinking like a freak

    23 Jun 2014 | 6:48 am
    I listen to the Freakonomics Radio podcast from time to time, and back in May they aired an episode called "the three hardest words...," which, purportedly, were I don't know. The premise was that people hate to admit ignorance and so they hardly ever say, "I don't know."Except that in most corpus studies, the head-and-shoulders most common, number one, top-of-the-heap three-word string in English is I don't know (It's a three-word string, not four, since -n't is an inflectional suffix, not just a contraction as is taught in elementary schools, but that's another issue.) For instance, in the…
  • Audio and the OED

    16 May 2014 | 2:32 pm
    As I mentioned, Schwa Fire is now out, and I've been quite enjoying it. Arika Okrent (whose name I have inexplicably misread for years as Akira) has written an article called "Ghost voices" about preserving audio-tape recordings of our all-too-impermanent voices, dialects, and languages. As I was reading it, it occurred to me that the OED should include audio recordings of the quotations it uses. These should be in the dialect, and where possible the actual voice, of the original author.
  • Schwa Fire

    16 May 2014 | 2:23 pm
    Back in November, 2013, there was a proposal on Kickstarter for a new language magazine. I chipped in to sponsor it and ended up on the editorial panel as a result. The first issue is now out.Issue 1, Season 1May 16, 2014• Schwa FireThe golden age of language journalism begins now. In this inaugural issue, Arika Okrent tells the story of 5,700 hours of Yiddish recordings that were almost lost ("Ghost Voices"), and Russell Cobb writes about Americans' fondness for the Englishes we used to speak and what that fondness obscures ("The Way We Talked"). Michael Erard describes and defends…
  • When "syndrome" is a final "s"

    15 May 2014 | 5:41 am
    1982 gave us the acronym AIDS formed from acquired immune deficiency syndrome. This is pronounced /eɪdz/. The fact that the final S is pronounced /z/ is notable, since a final s is typically pronounced /s/ (e.g., bus) unless it is an inflectional morpheme (e.g., dogs). There are cases such as news and lens, in which a final s is pronounced /z/, but the -s in news was originally a plural morpheme. That leaves lens, which comes from the Latin word for lentil. Apparently, it was pronounced /leːns/ in Latin, so why it has a final /z/ in English is something of a mystery to me. I cannot find…
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    Thoughts On Translation

  • On hiatus

    Corinne McKay
    14 Jul 2014 | 8:59 pm
    Thoughts on Translation is on hiatus until mid-August. In the meantime, you can explore the “Most Popular Posts” sidebar (in the grey box on the right) for some summer reading!
  • Upcoming online courses for freelancers

    Corinne McKay
    9 Jul 2014 | 3:12 pm
    The next sessions of my online courses start on August 20 (Beyond the Basics of Freelancing) and September 24 (Getting Started as a Freelance Translator). Getting Started is for students who want to launch and run a successful freelance business, and Beyond the Basics is for students who have established freelance businesses. Each class is […]
  • Getting started as a freelancer: how long does it take?

    Corinne McKay
    7 Jul 2014 | 1:57 pm
    Here’s a common question from beginning freelance translators, and from people contemplating freelancing: how long does it take to start a viable freelance business? The usual disclaimers apply. Is your non-English language Spanish or Japanese? Do you have just a language background, or a PhD in nuclear physics and a language background? Do you live […]
  • If I could be anywhere today…

    Corinne McKay
    1 Jul 2014 | 12:20 pm
    I’d be at the grand opening of Le Parc du Petit Prince (The Little Prince theme park) in Ungersheim, Alsace. An entire amusement park dedicated to The Little Prince! And I’d be wearing my Little Prince watch and t-shirt, and carrying my Little Prince keyring and tote bag. I also have some tiny plastic sheep […]
  • New podcast: insider tips for working with translation agencies

    Corinne McKay
    27 Jun 2014 | 6:27 pm
    This morning I had lots of fun interviewing translation industry veteran Steve Lank (Monterey graduate, former ASTM translation QA standard subcommittee chair, longtime senior-level manager in agencies in the US, Ireland and Spain). Steve is currently Vice President for Translation Services at Cesco Linguistic Services, working from the Washington, DC office. I put Steve in […]
 
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    Global by Design

  • Adobe and Google release open source CJK font family

    John Yunker
    31 Jul 2014 | 11:30 am
    This is the result of a massive investment of resources and expertise — and I’m excited they’ve made it open source. From Adobe: Source Han Sans, available in seven weights, is a typeface family which provides full support for Japanese, Korean, Traditional Chinese, and Simplified Chinese, all in one font. It also includes Latin, Greek, and Cyrillic […]
  • Aussies love .AU

    John Yunker
    22 Jul 2014 | 3:33 pm
    Keeping in mind that this is a survey funded by Australia’s registry, the data points pretty clearly toward a preference for .au over .com. From the announcement: The report found .au remains Australia’s home on the Internet with more than double the level of trust over any other namespace. George Pongas, General Manager of Naming Services at […]
  • Q&A with Kathleen Bostick of SDL

    John Yunker
    18 Jul 2014 | 3:49 pm
    I was happy to chat (virtually) with Kathleen recently about web globalization. Here’s the interview.
  • Gmail to be first major platform to support non-Latin email addresses

    John Yunker
    26 Jun 2014 | 10:38 am
    At the ICANN 50 conference Jordyn Buchanan of Google confirmed that Gmail would support EAI (email address internationalization) by the end of this month. This is significant news. But what does it mean exactly? I don’t have the details yet, but at a minimum I assume it means a Gmail user could create an email address using a […]
  • Google reenters the domain name business

    John Yunker
    23 Jun 2014 | 7:27 pm
    It is being reported that Google is venturing into new territory by getting into the domain registration business. This isn’t completely accurate. Google dabbled its feet in domain registration years ago. And a few months ago Google began accepting registrations for its Japanese TLD. But perhaps Google is serious this time about domains. I suspect it is, […]
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    Gilbane.com

  • Gilbane Conference schedule – sneak peek

    Frank Gilbane
    31 Jul 2014 | 11:43 am
    The full program will be published in a week or so, but the schedule is available now at http://gilbaneconference.com/2014/Schedule.  
  • Additional Gilbane Conference workshops posted

    Clea
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:13 am
    We’ll be posting the complete program for this years’ Gilbane Conference over the next 2-3 weeks on the main conference website. The afternoon workshops are below. Workshop D. Adaptive Content Modeling for Omnichannel UX Speaker: Noz Urbina, Consultant and Founder, Urbina Consulting Thursday, December, 4: 1:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Your users need you to come to this session, even if they don’t know it. Multi-channel, or “COPE (create once, publish everywhere)”, content is a bit of a holy grail. Our trade is discussing content being freed from the browser,…
  • First three Gilbane Conference workshops posted

    Clea
    30 Jun 2014 | 9:37 am
    We’ll be posting the complete program for this years’ Gilbane Conference over the next 4-5 weeks on the main conference website. The first three of the six planned workshops are below. Workshop A. Insiders Guide to Building Digital Marketing Technology Toolkit Speaker: Theresa Regli, Principal Analyst and Managing Partner, Real Story Group Thursday, December, 4: 9:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Marketing practitioners multitask just about every minute of every day. There are ongoing email, web, mobile, and marketing strategies to organize, plan and execute. Each of these areas used…
  • Gilbane Conference speaker proposals – update

    Frank Gilbane
    21 May 2014 | 4:34 am
    Thank you all for the Gilbane Conference speaker proposals. We received a record number again this year. We are now busy evaluating, organizing, and mapping proposals to the topic areas our audience needs to hear the most about. If you have submitted a proposal you can expect to hear from us over the next 6-7 weeks. With over 300 submissions we’ll have to make some difficult choices and we will be contacting many of you for further discussion. Miss the deadline? For all of you who missed the deadline to submit proposals for this year’s conference, our policy is that we always…
  • Deadline Reminder – Gilbane Conference call for papers

    Clea
    1 May 2014 | 9:12 am
    Don’t miss The Gilbane Conference Call for Papers Proposal deadline is May 9! The Gilbane Conference on Content and the Digital Experience is designed for marketers, content managers, technologists, and executives responsible for building strategies and implementations for compelling multichannel digital experiences for customers, employees, and partners. Topics are organized into four main tracks: Content, Marketing, and the Customer Experience – Designed for marketers, marketing technologists, growth hackers, content managers, strategists and technologists focused on customers…
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    Web-Translations » Blog Posts

  • Infographic: The Business Risks of Language Barriers

    Cassandra Oliver
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:28 am
    by ramseysdesignlab. The post Infographic: The Business Risks of Language Barriers appeared first on Web-Translations.
  • 7 ways to keep international customers coming back

    Cassandra Oliver
    23 Jul 2014 | 4:12 am
    Having won customers in international markets, you’ll be keen to make sure they keep returning to buy from you. This is even trickier than usual when you are not present and locally-based to cater to their needs. The simple fact is that it is likely to take longer to build a loyal repeat customer base overseas than it would in your domestic market, and consequently you need to be prepared to make a significant investment and bide your time. You’ll be pleased to know that there are several things you can do to help this process on its way. If you get into these good habits, your…
  • Friday infographic

    Cassandra Oliver
    18 Jul 2014 | 9:28 am
    This infographic comes to us from Lebara Mobile, and looks at technology terms that are becoming obsolete or changing meaning. Enjoy! The post Friday infographic appeared first on Web-Translations.
  • 10 tips for starting out in international trade

    Cassandra Oliver
    17 Jul 2014 | 9:17 am
    We thought we’d share some of the things that have worked for our clients when getting started in international markets. Read on for some valuable tips! 1. Leverage existing clients’ connections Are any of your clients international? Can you leverage a relationship to get an introduction? The implicit trust of a referral is powerful when trying to establish contacts in a new market. 2. Use multilingual web pages to attract an audience A professionally translated website or microsite that pays attention to local language and culture will draw interest and enquiries from potential…
  • European Trustmark for eCommerce

    Cassandra Oliver
    1 Jul 2014 | 8:05 am
    EMOTA (European Multi-channel and Online Trade Association) launched its European Trustmark for eCommerce in March of this year. This mark is designed to enhance customer trust and facilitate cross-border online shopping, consequently increasing conversions and revenue for European eTailers. The trustmark aims to set a universal standard by promoting clear communication, transparent pricing and a high level of attention to data protection and customer privacy. While each individual country has various existing trustmarks already, these are often not as recognisable to international shoppers…
 
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    A Woman Learning Thai... and some men too ;-)| Women Learn Thai

  • Thai Bites Live Event: Road to Fluency

    Catherine Wentworth
    28 Jul 2014 | 5:32 am
    Thai Bites Live Event: Road to Fluency… On the Sixth of August, Stuart Jay Raj from Jcademy, along with Arthit Juyaso (Duke Language School) and Mike Campbell (Glossika Language Training), will hold a Thai Bites Live Event at the Aloft Hotel, Sukhumvit Soi 11, Bangkok. Admission and drinks are free – reserve early as there are only 80 seats available. To reserve a seat: Jcademy Facebook Please click ‘attending’ via facebook. You will then be asked to re-confirm via email with the number of required reserved seats. Mail enquiries and bookings to info@jcademy.com. To…
  • 2014: The Sixth Google Translate Challenge

    Catherine Wentworth
    21 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Google Translate, the challenge… Welcome to the SIXTH Google Translate Challenge! Apologies, I’m a day late getting this one launched. Tedious, I know, but I’ve been off my game for awhile. To recap… 2009: The First Google Translate Challenge I ran two sets of Thai phrases through Google Translate. I shared one list online and the other I kept to myself. 2010: The Second Google Translate Challenge Reran both sets of Thai phrases through Google Translate and created another set to keep to myself. 2011: The Third Google Translate Challenge Reran everything through Google…
  • FREE Download: Glossika Thai Fluency 1 GMS and GSR

    Catherine Wentworth
    10 Jul 2014 | 1:48 am
    FREE download: Glossika Thai Fluency 1 GMS and GSR… If you’d like to try Glossika’s new Thai course before you buy, download Glossika Thai Fluency 1 GMS (Glossika Mass Sentences) and GSR (Glossika Spaced Repetition). iTunes: Glossika Thai Fluency 1: GMS iTunes: Glossika Thai Fluency 1: GSR You can also download the files direct from Glossika.com: Glossika: Thai Fluency 1: GMS Glossika: Thai Fluency 1: GSR Note: These are only the audio files. Buy the course to get the pdf’s at their still reduced price. Also available for free download are Italian, Russian, Korean,…
  • Unlikely but True Origins of the Thai Script

    Michel Boismard
    7 Jul 2014 | 3:17 am
    Unlikely but True Origins of the Thai Script… We can trace the Thai script back in time and space (mostly going West) to the Phoenicians, whose alphabet is the mother of all European and Indic systems of writing, including Greek, Hebrew and Arabic! These people were great traders and had links to lands beyond the river Indus. So East went their written words… But back to the Thai script (we are NOT referring to the language here!). Modern Thai letters are an evolution from the old form used in Sukhothai and they were devised under the King Ramkhanhaeng transforming the Khmer…
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    Russian Language Blog

  • Skills Russians Rock

    Maria
    31 Jul 2014 | 12:53 am
    Image by Brad.K on flickr.com Russian people may sometimes surprise you by certain things they seem to do effortlessly. A Russian person probably takes these skills for granted because they are emphasized in the Russian education system, but they may still stand out to people outside Russia. Unaided math Image by David Goehring on flickr.com One thing people educated in Russia and, I would suppose, the neighboring countries are good at is doing math in their head (считть в уме). More often than not students not allowed to use calculators (испльзовать калькултор)…
  • Russian Mail-Order Brides (Part II)

    Jenya
    29 Jul 2014 | 10:05 pm
    Russian Wedding by Brett Jordan on Flickr.com If you missed the beginning of the story, here it is . The challenges faced by couples that get together on these mail-order bride sites are many. Too often, the woman does not speak English very well, or at all. It is hard enough to effectively communicate with one another if you speak the same language. Just imagine the difficulty faced by these couples. Russian women coming to America are usually giving up quite a bit. Unfortunately, this simple fact is frequently overlooked by their husbands-to-be. Often the woman has a job to quit or…
  • Russian Mail-Order Brides (Part One)

    Jenya
    28 Jul 2014 | 11:54 pm
    “Leaving Home” by Alexander Saprykin on flickr.com It seems, unfairly so, that when I tell somebody that I came to America from Russia, they  often assume that I was a mail-order bride. Through the internet, mail-order bride websites have flourished in recent years. I do have  many friends who first met their current or ex-spouses on these websites. Some of these friends seem happily married and some have had very difficult times. As I was writing this, I tried to combine  knowledge gained from some of my friends, as well as some research on the subject. First let’s…
  • Take Your Pronunciation to the Next Level – Part II

    Maria
    28 Jul 2014 | 12:51 am
    You will need this sound to say “cheese” in Russian Image by Rob Campbell on flickr.com This post is continued from last week. We were talking about the top areas you should concentrate on to drastically improve your Russian pronunciation. 4. ы is a funny sound. It is not considered very pretty-sounding in Russian, and few native words have it. At the same time, it is widely used to form plurals and appears in such common words as (you sing.), (you pl. or formal), and (we). Ы only appears after hard consonants in Russian (soft consonants will be followed by и). Does that make…
  • Driving in Russia

    Jenya
    22 Jul 2014 | 10:40 pm
    image by Petr Magera on flickr.com While you can drive in almost every country on Earth, the driving experience you can get in Russia could be priceless . While it can be exciting to take in the unparalleled  beauty that the country has to offer, the lack of “driving necessities” may leave you stranded, lost, or worse. For example, driving in the US, you expect the interstates and freeways to be well stocked with gas stations, restaurants, easy-to-read and clearly marked road signs, and stores; in Russia you cannot take these things for granted and in many places, you’ll be…
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    Polish Language Blog

  • Has anyone seen The Waterfall Castle in Poland?

    Kasia
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:36 pm
    While researching different websites about beautiful places to visit in Poland (the ones I have not had a chance to see yet, even after living in Poland for 20 years), a beautiful picture of this amazing fairy tale castle comes up…It features a stone castle gracefully caressed by gently falling water. Ancient yet immaculate. Manmade but also one with nature. The image appeals to our sense of adventure, our need to embrace history and our desire to be humbled by nature. So tantalizing close, yet almost impractically far for those who cannot afford to spend their vacation scouring the…
  • No “Year in Russia” for Poland any more!

    Kasia
    24 Jul 2014 | 3:15 pm
    I’m suer most of you follow the news and heard about the horrible tragedy that happened last week to the Malaysian flight. The Polish government has called off preparations for the Polish Year in Russia amid the ongoing crisis in Ukraine and the alleged shooting down by pro-Russian separatists of a Malaysian jetliner last week. The decision was taken after Malaysian Airlines flight MH17 was allegedly shot down by pro-Russian rebels in eastern Ukraine towards the end of last week, killing all 298 on board. This is the decision of the government, but both the foreign and culture…
  • I scream, you scream! We all scream for ice cream! Lody, lody!

    Kasia
    20 Jul 2014 | 1:43 pm
    Today is International Ice Cream day! Who doesn’t like ice cream? In fact, the entire month of July is known by some as Ice Cream month. What better way to celebrate than with some fun facts about our favorite cold and delicious treat! Image by Sandy Austin on Flickr.com According to Yahoo! the top five ice cream flavors (pięć najpopularniejszych smaków lodów)) are: 1. Strawberry (Truskawkowy) 2. Banana (Bananowy) 3. Chocolate (Czekoladowy) 4. Coconut Milk (Mleko kokosowe) 5. Peach (Brzoskwiniowy) The top five cities that love ice cream the most (pięć miast, które kochają lody…
  • What is your favorite way to spend time off? How Poles spend their days off?

    Kasia
    13 Jul 2014 | 2:41 pm
    How do you like to spend your day off? Of course there are so many different ways to do it! Here is what I like to do on my day/evening/morning off (of course not all at once:)): Read a book – czytać książkę Watch a good movie – oglądać dobry/ciekawy film Enjoy a cup of coffee on the deck – delektować się filiżanką kawy na tarasie Go camping – wybrać się na kemping Hiking in the mountains – wędrować po górach Swim in the lake – pływać w jeziorze Spend a day on the beach - spędzić dzień na plaży My daughters playing on the beach Go for a…
  • Skydiving in Poland? Have you tried it?

    Kasia
    6 Jul 2014 | 4:23 pm
    Skydiving and parachuting is a very popular “sport” in Poland and there are plenty of different dropzones to enjoy or for the beginner, there are many places where skydiving or parachuting (spadochroniarstwo) courses (kursy) are offered. Poland attracts skydivers from around the world and in August 2010, skydivers (spadochroniarze) in Poland broke the European record for the number of people in a formation when 104 people joined together in the air. The team jumped out of five planes at a height of 4,800 metres (15748 feet). The jump was their 15th attempt at breaking the record.
 
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    Ingls na Ponta da Lngua

  • Expressões Idiomáticas com Time em Inglês

    Denilso de Lima
    30 Jul 2014 | 10:03 pm
    A palavra time é de longe o substantivo mais usado na língua inglesa. Isso acontece não só porque time significa “tempo”, mas principalmente porque há em inglês inúmeras expressões idiomáticas nas quais a palavra time se faz presente. Portanto, nesta dica você aprenderá 10 expressões idiomáticas com time para ajudar você a ficar ainda mais com seu inglês na ponta da língua. »» Aprenda muitas expressões idiomáticas em inglês com o nosso ebook Expressões Idiomáticas (com áudio). Custa só R$14,90 e pode ser comprado clicando aqui! «« (all) in good time »…
  • Atividade para Treinar o Vocabulário em Inglês

    Denilso de Lima
    29 Jul 2014 | 9:50 am
    No livro Inglês na Ponta da Língua – método inovador para melhorar o seu vocabulário, eu dou uma série de dicas para o estudante treinar o vocabulário em inglês constantemente. São atividades, jogos, brincadeiras, etc., simples que podem ser feitas em qualquer local usando apenas uma folha de papel e uma caneta/lápis. [Curta nossa fanpage no Facebook: facebook.com/inglesnapontadalingua] As atividades sugeridas tem por objetivo estimular o cérebro e assim mantê-lo focado na tarefa de aprender inglês. Em outras palavras são atividades para ajudar a memorizar as palavras. Abaixo…
  • Lista de Provérbios em Inglês

    Denilso de Lima
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:47 pm
    Segue abaixo uma pequena lista de provérbios em inglês. Mas antes, que tal aprender um pouco mais sobre os provérbio. Afinal, o que é um provérbio e quando usá-los? Se você tem essa curiosidade, leia o texto inteiro. Mas, caso você queira apenas uma lista de provérbios em inglês, então pule para a parte final da dica. O que são provérbios? Provérbio nada mais é do que um ditado popular. Ou seja, frases ou expressões que procuram transmitir de modo resumido conhecimentos comuns sobre a vida. A maioria dos provérbios foram criados na antiguidade. Logo, estão relacionados…
  • Phrasal Verbs com Bring

    Denilso de Lima
    27 Jul 2014 | 10:03 pm
    Precisando aprender alguns phrasal verbs com bring? Portanto, nesta dica você aprenderá alguns bem comuns no dia a dia de quem fala inglês. Caso você queira aprender mais sobre phrasal verbs, adquira já o ebook The Black Book of Phrasal Verbs, com dicas e atividades para deixar você com os phrasal verbs sempre na ponta da língua. [Lembre-se que um único phrasal verb pode ter outros significados de acordo com o contexto; portanto, é sempre bom consultar um dicionário para aprender melhor o(s) significado(s) de cada phrasal verb. Leia a dica Aprenda Phrasal Verbs em Contexto para…
  • Livros para Ler em Inglês

    Denilso de Lima
    1 Jul 2014 | 2:30 am
    Muitas pessoas costumam me enviar e-mails pedindo sugestões de livros para ler em inglês. Raramente, eu dou dicas de títulos. O que faço é dar uma dica que ajuda cada pessoa a encontrar algo que atenda seus gostos e necessidades. Caso você queira saber que dica é esta, continue lendo! A dica é simples: vá a uma livraria (ou site de livrarias) e procure por livros conhecidos como LIVROS DE LEITURA SIMPLIFICADA EM INGLÊS ou LIVROS DE LEITURA FACILITADA EM INGLÊS. A imagem abaixo mostra a prateleira da Livraria Cultura do Shopping Curitiba. Estes livros são escritos levando em conta…
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    Babel's Dawn

  • How Can You Recognize Language?

    Blair
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:18 pm
    Coach signals a play. Is that language or something else? This is a blog about the origins of speech, but what began? How can we tell it when we see it? Parents usually say their children have started talking when they have a couple of words. Linguists tend to look for some hint of grammar. Some experts look for a favorite generative procedure. So there is room for argument even before we come up with a single fact about the beginnings. I have always taken a functional approach. When I started this blog I could not have said precisely what I was looking for, but now I know what I want. I call…
  • Blogger Interviewed

    Blair
    14 Jul 2014 | 6:46 am
    The Grammarist is an entertaining blog on all things language-related. I have enjoyed their posts on word usage and spelling. Spelling! Can you believe that. It has always been my weakest suit, but they cover it well. They surprised me recently by emerging from the aether to interview me. The curious can check out the results right here.
  • Forget Communication; Study Cognition

    Blair
    9 Jul 2014 | 1:14 pm
    Leonard Talmy is an interesting fellow who has spent the past several decades exploring the way languages express thoughts. Can we have thoughts that we cannot express verbally? Many poets spend their lives trying to express the inexpressible. We know too that there are many ideas which can be expressed mathematically, but not verbally. How about the reverse; are there things we can think in words but not in other ways? For instance, language allows us to think it terms of what grammarians call mood. Talmy calls this a topic's "reality status." That's something not included in mathematical…
  • I’m Tired of Chomsky (Part III)

    Blair
    18 Jun 2014 | 8:33 pm
    Kant combined Aristotle's dependence on the senses with a few Platonic prejudices.  In two previous posts I summarized Chomsky's theory of language (Part I) and an alternative theory (Part II). In this final section I wrap up. So … Besides having the experimental evidence on its side, the alternate theory is more in keeping with what we have learned from natural history and its evolutionary backbone. It seems impossibly naïve to rely on a single mutation to account for human uniqueness. Mutations occur all the time and are part of every generation. If a single mutation was all it took to…
  • I'm Tired of Chomsky (Part II)

    Blair
    17 Jun 2014 | 8:21 pm
    Aristotle taught that all knowledge comes through the senses. Part I summarized Chomsky's theory of internal language and said that an alternate theory is possible. In this part I present that alternative. Alternate Theory: Community First, we can say there are several fundamental differences between humans and other primates, not just one. Humans can have parents from culture A but, when raised by members of culture B, they act like members of culture B. Chomsky often mentions this point, yet he never puzzles over what a strange fact this is. If you try to raise a wolf as a dog, you get a…
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    Macmillan

  • Language tip of the week: interest

    Liz Potter
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the patterns that can follow the noun interest: When the noun interest... [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Word roots and routes: heart

    Jonathan Marks
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    Next in a series of posts exploring some of the ‘roots’ and ‘routes’ of English vocabulary. Heart (Germanic) has relatives in words beginning with card- (from Greek) and cord- / cour- (from Latin/French).* The Greek root is used in medical terminology; cardiac arrest, for example, is a term used by medical professionals for what the […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Life skills tip of the week: saying you are unsure about something

    Liz Potter
    29 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    As part of this year’s pragmatics series, we bring more useful content and tips from the Macmillan Dictionary on expressing yourself. The previous language tip looked at ways of expressing personal opinions in writing. This week’s tip gives some ways of saying you are unsure about something: In our recent post on ways of saying […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Get your gas mask on – toot sweet! World War I, and its impact on English

    Michael Rundell
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    There’s a popular song from World War I about a soldier going off to the front. It starts with the lines: Brother Bertie went away To do his bit the other day (You can hear an original recording here.) “Doing your bit” – taking your fair share of a job that has to be done […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Language and words in the news – 25th July, 2014

    Liz Potter
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
 
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    Pimsleur Approach Blog

  • Perfecting the Art of Language Learning: A Story Told by Pimsleur’s Customer of the Month

    Pimsleur Approach
    29 Jul 2014 | 6:30 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com When it comes to language learning, not every person who uses the Pimsleur Approach will have as many opportunities to practice their newly acquired skills, as Father Mitch Pacwa has.  However, we still think his is a story worth telling. Father Mitch combines his work in the parish of St. Elias Maronite Catholic Church with his broadcasting career; he works for the Eternal Word Television Network, which reaches 220 million homes worldwide. In both of these positions, he has found that the Arabic, Italian and Polish that he has learned using the Pimsleur…
  • July Chatterbox: Learn a Language While Asleep & To Deal w/ Trauma, the Science Behind Language & Gender + More!

    Pimsleur Approach
    25 Jul 2014 | 6:15 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com Welcome to this month’s Chatterbox! We have all the important language-learning news, scientific developments and advice, as well as a blog we know you’ll love. Enjoy this month’s Chatterbox – and feel free to pitch in with your suggestions for next month! The Science of Language Language experts believe language learning requires a combination of memorization and grammar. Yet now it has become clear that these two key aspects also have a gender divide. A new study reveals that boys and girls learn languages very differently – and even use…
  • Learn Language Expressions From Around the Globe: Summer Weather Idioms

    Laura Mundow
    22 Jul 2014 | 6:18 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com Have you ever said you are “melting” with the heat? Or that it’s “hot as hell”? You’re not literally melting of course, and you’ve scarcely an idea of how hot it is in hell, but you’re using an idiomatic expression to describe heat. Idioms, sayings and proverbs reveal much about their language’s culture and country. People are particularly descriptive about that condition which dominates us all: the weather. Let’s make hay while the sun shines and learn some foreign language summer sayings. Spanish Hasta el 40 de mayo, no te quites el…
  • July Travel Roundup: Visit the Fountains of Youth, the Streets of Barcelona, George Lucas’ Narrative Museum & More

    Pimsleur Approach
    18 Jul 2014 | 6:27 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com By this time in July, you should have just about recovered from the soccer World Cup in Brazil, while Independence Day celebrations are just a memory. Can anything keep you going until August? Let’s see… READING Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot comMyanmar Dogs are man’s best friend, but even if you’re not a fan of canine companions, this charming tale about one dog and his owner is perfect poolside reading. It hits the booksellers on July 22. For some travel inspiration, Lonely Planet’s guide to Myanmar is a must buy. Food gets a couple of…
  • A Global Look at SIX Exciting (& Unique) Summer Festivals!

    Will Noble
    15 Jul 2014 | 6:29 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com Summer Festivals to Get Excited About Between July and September The weird, the ethereal, the messy and the very messy. As we fall headlong into summer, it’s important to make the most of sizzling days and sultry evenings. One-way to do this is to head to one or two of the festivals taking place between now and September. Whichever nook of the globe you’re in, you’re likely to find something. Here are some, which have tickled our fancy. Boryeong Mud Festival (July 18-27) It’s well documented that being slathered in certain types of…
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    PhraseMix.com Blog

  • 41 unique ways to practice listening to English

    13 Jul 2014 | 8:55 am
    Our PhraseMix Premium service gives you a super-easy way to improve your English by listening to key example sentences. But there are lots of other ways to practice listening to English, if you're willing to put in the time and effort. We've pulled together a big list of 41 interesting ways that you can improve your listening skill. Tweet This Idea! Get hooked on an English TV show. Find an English-language drama or comedy that seems interesting, and start watching it from the beginning. Follow the storylines and get to know all the characters. Not sure what to watch? Here's a list of some of…
  • Another interview: ALsensei from the English 2.0 podcast

    10 Apr 2014 | 4:59 am
    ALsensei from alsensei.com interviewed me recently for his English 2.0 podcast. We talked about the most common questions English learners ask, my ideas for how to learn English faster, and tips for being productive. Check out the interview here: English 2.0 Teacher Interview 5 - Aaron from PhraseMix
  • A cool trick for memorizing sentences

    2 Nov 2013 | 6:34 pm
    Someone recently told me about a cool trick for memorizing things.  I wish I could remember who told me about the trick, and where they got it from. But I looked the trick up online and found an article about it from QuickAndDirtyTips.com. Imagine that you're trying to memorize a PhraseMix sentence (which I strongly recommend that you do). The normal way to memorize the sentence would be to repeat the full thing, again and again, from the beginning. So try that now. Read this sentence out loud to yourself five times: “I'd just like to say, on behalf of everyone here, good luck in…
  • An interview with the "Let's Master English" podcast

    29 Oct 2013 | 5:34 am
    This week, I was interviewed for a podcast called "Let's Master English". The host, Coach Shane, is a really smart guy and easy to talk to. We talked about how I got started with PhraseMix, some of my recommendations for language learners, describe my idea of "bottlenecks" in language learning, and the upcoming live PhraseMix Academy class. Listen here: http://directory.libsyn.com/episode/index/show/letsmasterenglish/id/2525448 And you can also subscribe to the podcast with iTunes.  
  • Bottlenecks

    13 Sep 2013 | 10:23 am
    In English, the word "bottleneck" describes something that slows down a process. Think about the shape of a wine bottle. The bottom part is wider, but in order for the wine to pour out, it has to pass through the narrow "neck" of the bottle. This limits how quickly you can pour it. We use the term "bottleneck" to talk about things like business processes. Whenever one specific part of a system is slowing down the entire system, it's a bottleneck. Where are your bottlenecks? It can be really useful to consider where the bottlenecks in your English learning are. For example, imagine someone who…
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    Globalization Partners International - Blog

  • Connecting with Social Networks in China

    27 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    In my recent blog What You Should Know About Chinese SEO , we discussed how Baidu and other local search engines in China monopolize the Chinese market while other worldly renown search engines (Google, Yahoo and Bing) TOGETHER share less than 5% of the market. You should not be surprised to know that China has its own social media. Top social media networks in China 1. Weibo:  weibo ( 微博) means microblog in Chinese. It pretty much functions as Twitter in China. There are two main players:  Sina Weibo ( 新浪微博) with over 400 million users and Tencent Weibo (腾讯微博)…
  • It’s EPiServer Summit time!

    21 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    The 2014 EPiServer North American Summit is once again upon us. This has traditionally been an EPiServer partners-only event, but this year the summit is open to clients as well. With an increase in attendees, comes the need to expand to a larger venue. This year the event will be hosted at the Chicago Swissotel on July 30th. EPiServer in North America 2014 has been a breakout year for EPiServer in North America. In Europe, their home base, they are well-established as a leading CMS/eCommerce platform. EpiServer has put in a lot of effort to grow their business in North America. Their work is…
  • Are Languages at Risk from National Boundaries?

    17 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Linguistic borders according to Putinism What would happen to our world if we reduced the number of languages from 7,000 to 9? Imagine how this would affect relationships between people, nations, commerce, education and all institutions. According to Putinism, the fact that Russian speakers should be protected everywhere opens a great discussion around the world. My favorite magazine The Economist took some time to provide an interesting and detailed analysis of how this argument might work. Boundaries across nations would need to be restructured and as per Mr. Putin's principles, linguistic…
  • Culture and E-Business in India - Infographic

    14 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    If you are planning to do online business in India, if you want to be successful in targeting the Indian marketplace, it is important to understand the needs of your target customers, the consumer behaviors, the Indian traditions, the languages and the key insights about the market. This blog post released by Globalization Partners International contains the information for the Indian market on culture and e-business along with accompanying infographic, which covers a wide range of topics from country facts to online business tips for India. Facts about the Indian Market India is…
  • Review: The Economist Traveller Briefing Series

    8 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    The Economist is my favorite magazine. It provides unbiased articles on politics, science, culture, books, history and business, all with a global focus. With this wealth of information they have developed a series of "Traveller Briefings" that cover reports for Brazil, Britain, China, India, Russia, South Africa and South Korea. Recently I purchased one of the reports. iTunes offers them for $9.99 per report download. They are also available for the same price on the Google Play store or as an interactive PDF download. I chose the China report as Chinese translation for the Mainland is by…
 
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    PhraseMix.com Daily English Lessons

  • "We're not stopping to get ice cream, and that's that!"

    29 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    You're riding in a car with your family. Your kids are in the back seat, and they're begging you to get ice cream for them. They keep asking again and again, but you keep saying "no". Now it's starting to annoy you. You say this to end the conversation. We're not stopping to get ice cream, and that's that!
  • "If you have questions about anything, feel free to come by and ask, any time."

    28 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    There's a new employee at your company. You've just introduced yourself. You offer to help this person. If you have questions about anything, feel free to come by and ask, any time.
  • "Not exactly, but I did get some promising leads."

    27 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    You're a salesperson. You just got back from a conference. Your boss asks if you made any sales. You didn't, but you met several people who you think you might be able to sell to successfully. You say this in response. Not exactly, but I did get some promising leads.
  • "The real key is establishing a relationship with the client."

    24 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    You're having lunch with a junior salesperson who's just starting her first sales job at your company. You give her this advice on how to be successful as a salesperson. The real key is establishing a relationship with the client.
  • "Oh wow, that sounds really interesting."

    23 Jul 2014 | 5:00 pm
    You're chatting with the person sitting next to you on an airplane. He tells you that he's a professional writer. You're impressed, so you say this. Oh wow, that sounds really interesting.
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    Lexiophiles

  • Mother’s day: my mommy always said…

    Montira
    31 Jul 2014 | 1:01 am
    Mother’s love is a predominant devotion regardless of species, races or circumstances. Mother’s day in Thailand marks the 12th of August every year; a day to honor the most important person in our lives: the one who gave birth to us, raised us through infancy, taught us how to count and put up with our misdeeds. But as impeccable as these things are, mom gives us more wonderful presents, her words of wisdom, in which she taught us how to be the good person she has always wanted us to be. Here is what my mom has taught me, and I never forget:   Save for a rainy day; “money can be…
  • สุขสันต์วันแม่: แม่ของฉันสอนตลอดว่า…

    Montira
    31 Jul 2014 | 1:00 am
    ความรักของแม่นั้นเป็นความรักที่ปราศจากเงื่อนไขไม่ว่าจะเป็นสัตว์ชนิดไหน ชนเผ่าหรือชนชาติไหนบนโลก วันแม่แห่งชาติของประเทศไทยนั้นตรงกับวันที่ 12 สิงหาคมของทุกปี ซึ่งวันที่เฉลิมฉลองให้แก่บุคคลที่คอยเลี้ยงดู…
  • Movie Review – The Clown (2011): A Brazilian internal drama

    Lais
    30 Jul 2014 | 1:01 am
    Director: Selton MelloCast: Selton Mello, Paulo José, Larissa ManoelaLanguage: Portuguese In the deep Brazilian countryside, where there are no cinemas or theaters, the circus is the main form of entertainment. They come once a year, raise their tent, make people laugh and then leave. But how do they lead their lives? That’s what The Clown (2011), O Palhaço in its original Brazilian title, wants to discuss. The drama is set in the 70s and follows the life of Benjamin, a performer from the Esperança circus. The clown and his father, Valdemar, are the main attraction of the circus.
  • S.I.C.I.L.I.A. : how to fall in love with 7 words

    Francesca
    29 Jul 2014 | 1:01 am
    How much do you know about one of the pearls of the Mediterranean Sea? Here you are: seven letters, seven words to fall in love with it. Sirocco: When it blows from Africa the sky gets yellow, a cloak of sand covers the cities and being outside feels like having a hairdryer constantly in front of your face. Forget any kind of physical effort; even eating (Italian national sport) is unbearable. Just turn on the fan and get a nap. Island: Sicily is the biggest Italian island, therefore its culture and lifestyle are strictly connected to the sea. Its central location in the Mediterranean made it…
  • S.I.C.I.L.I.A. : 7 parole per innamorarsene

    Francesca
    29 Jul 2014 | 1:00 am
    Quanto ne sapete su una delle perle del Mediterraneo? Ecco a voi: sette lettere, sette parole per innamorarsene. Scirocco: Quando soffia dall’Africa, il cielo diventa giallo, un manto di sabbia copre le città e stare all’aperto è come avere un asciugacapelli costantemente di fronte al viso. Dimenticate ogni tipo di sforzo fisico; anche mangiare (sport nazionale italiano) è insopportabile. Si può solo accendere il ventilatore e schiacciare un pisolino. Isola: La Sicilia è la più grande isola italiana, quindi la sua cultura e stile di vita sono strettamente collegati al mare. La…
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    Dado Que - Latest Content

  • Notes from ¿Qué tal? - Ser

    30 Jul 2014 | 9:00 am
    Here are some basic language functions of set. To identify people and things Yo soy estudiante. La doctora Ramos es profesora. Alicia y yo somos amigas. Esto es un libro. To describe people and things* Soy sentimental. – I'm sentimental (a sentimental person). El coche es muy viejo. – The car is very old. With de, to express origin Somos de los Estados Unidos. – We're from the United States. ¿De dónde es Ud.? – Where are you from? To express generalizations (only es) Es importante estudiar, pero no es necesario estudiar todos los…
 
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       Medical Translation Insight

  • 5 great resources for medical translation research

    ForeignExchange Translations
    31 Jul 2014 | 9:55 am
    Researching medical terminology is a big and important part of every medical translator's professional life. There are hundreds of resources for medical translators online - for different language pairs and different areas of specialization. Karen Sexton compiled five especially useful tools on her blog. Here is how she selected them:Medilexicon: This dictionary also features in my dictionaries
  • 25th Life Sciences roundtable at Localization World

    ForeignExchange Translations
    5 Jun 2014 | 11:51 am
    The 25th edition of Localization World kicked off in Dublin on Tuesday with the Life Science roundtable. With 24 attendees, this was one of the largest roundtables to-date. A number of topics were discussed ranging from the new trends towards content "digitalization" and what it means to medical translation suppliers. As in the past, there were a number of sessions on technology. The panel on
  • Translation 101: Developing Product Documentation with the World in mind

    FxConferences
    3 Jun 2014 | 9:56 am
    Thursday June 12th, 20148:30am Breakfast and Networking9:00am – 11:00am Presentation and Discussion Translation is an arcane discipline, where state-of-the-art technology comes together with a very human process. Done well, medical translations can save lives by getting products to market faster with the vital information needed for safe, correct use. But it can be expensive and time-consuming,
  • 30% discount for MemoQ Translator Pro - hurry!

    ForeignExchange Translations
    26 Feb 2014 | 12:28 pm
    After using MemoQ server for the past several years, ForeignExchange is now using MemoQ as the primary CAT tool on all translation projects. This decision came out of a comprehensive review of our tools strategy. As part of this review, we compared several CAT tools on usability, TM compatibility, level of support, QA features, TM server technology and pricing. Based on these criteria, we found
  • Why partnerships between PRO developers and medical translation providers make sense

    ForeignExchange Translations
    12 Feb 2014 | 8:23 am
    The goal of Linguistic Validation of Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs) is to achieve linguistic and conceptual equivalence so that data gathered from participants in multinational studies may be pooled across languages and cultures. A critical component of the linguistic validation process is the creation of a list of concept elaborations during the project preparation stage. The objectives of
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    JLPT Boot Camp - The Ultimate Study Guide to passing the Japanese Language Proficiency Test

  • JLPT Study Guide – Month 7

    Clayton MacKnight
    30 Jul 2014 | 8:47 am
    This is a continuing series going over a sample JLPT study guide. If you are just joining the discussion, you might want to check out month 1, month 2, month 3, month 4, month 5 and month 6 before continuing. You may start to wonder at this point if learning a language is all about drilling and drilling some more. Well, no not really. Doing some limited drilling can help you focus on specific points and weaknesses that you need to fix in order to understand and use them well. It can be an efficient way to narrowly practice a few bits and pieces of the language that really need tweaking. But,…
  • JLPT BC 141 | Post Test Slump

    Clayton MacKnight
    23 Jul 2014 | 8:03 am
    About a week ago, I went up to Kyoto University to take the test again at their somewhat poorly cooled facility. I covered my first impressions before earlier, but in general I felt more confident about the test.  I’ve started to take test day a little less seriously, which seems to be helping with my test score. Now it is just a matter of waiting for the results, which typically come somewhere around the last Tuesday of August. This lull between the test and results always seems to slow everything down. You don’t want to keep studying for the level you just did, but at the same…
  • JLPT N5 Grammar: Using nanno, donna, and dorekurai/donokurai

    Clayton MacKnight
    16 Jul 2014 | 8:21 am
    This month, we are asking more questions. Specifically, we are going to ask what kind and how much/many questions in Japanese. I will also be talking about how to make offers in Japanese as well. I go over the more common uses in the video below: For more videos like this one, be sure to subscribe to the JLPT N5 Grammar YouTube Channel Or check out some of the other N5 grammar videos: Japanese adjectives Japanese adjectives – past tense Japanese adjectives – polite past tense Japanese particle wa Japanese particle ga Japanese present tense verbs Japanese past tense verbs Kore vs.
  • July 2014 JLPT N1 First Reactions

    Clayton MacKnight
    6 Jul 2014 | 1:26 am
    I always enjoy my twice a year journey to Kyoto University. It’s a pretty big campus and has some unique buildings on it. Although the buildings are all named almost the same thing on the Yoshida campus, where the hold the test, it is generally a nice facility as long as it is not extremely hot or cold outside. And today was almost perfect temperature-wise. The rain at the end was a bit of a bummer though. Especially since I totally forgot to bring umbrella, despite the fact that it almost always rains when I take the test. I noticed some of the testing process has changed a bit. Kyodai…
  • JLPT BC 140 | Top 10 things to do in Japan

    Clayton MacKnight
    2 Jul 2014 | 7:57 am
    This post is a continuation of last month’s top 10. #80991982 / gettyimages.com 5. Purikura This is one of those things that most people probably don’t know about outside of Japan, but can be the source of  a lot of good times with friends and significant others. If you haven’t heard of what purikura is, it’s pretty simple really. It’s basically a photo booth where you can take pictures of you and your tomodachi. They can be a little intimidating at first especially since a lot of the commands are given verbally so you have to listen well and move quick to get…
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    Macmillan

  • Language tip of the week: interest

    Liz Potter
    31 Jul 2014 | 8:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the patterns that can follow the noun interest: When the noun interest means ‘a feeling of wanting to know more about something’, it is followed by the preposition in, not for: ✗ There is a growing interest for oriental cultures and philosophies. ✓ There is a growing interest in oriental cultures and…
  • Word roots and routes: heart

    Jonathan Marks
    30 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    Next in a series of posts exploring some of the ‘roots’ and ‘routes’ of English vocabulary. Heart (Germanic) has relatives in words beginning with card- (from Greek) and cord- / cour- (from Latin/French).* The Greek root is used in medical terminology; cardiac arrest, for example, is a term used by medical professionals for what the general public call a heart attack. Apart from its physiological function, the heart is traditionally regarded as the source of feelings and emotions, and this is reflected in numerous derived words and phrases, such as be in good heart, kind-hearted, have…
  • Life skills tip of the week: saying you are unsure about something

    Liz Potter
    29 Jul 2014 | 4:00 am
    As part of this year’s pragmatics series, we bring more useful content and tips from the Macmillan Dictionary on expressing yourself. The previous language tip looked at ways of expressing personal opinions in writing. This week’s tip gives some ways of saying you are unsure about something: In our recent post on ways of saying you are sure about something we looked at some phrases that are used to express certainty. Here are some ways of saying you are unsure about something. I think is used when you are not completely certain about something: I think that’s what he said, but I…
  • Get your gas mask on – toot sweet! World War I, and its impact on English

    Michael Rundell
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    There’s a popular song from World War I about a soldier going off to the front. It starts with the lines: Brother Bertie went away To do his bit the other day (You can hear an original recording here.) “Doing your bit” – taking your fair share of a job that has to be done – is just one of many expressions coined during the brutal four-year conflict that was originally known as “the Great War”. The war began 100 years ago, on July 28th, 1914, so this is a good moment to look at its impact on the English language. Major wars always bring developments in military…
  • Language and words in the news – 25th July, 2014

    Liz Potter
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:00 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link for us to include, or just add a comment to the post, with the link(s) you’d like to share. Language change and slang 10 Words Whose Pronunciation Has Changed Over Time As languages change, so do pronunciations. This list contains ten words that have gone…
 
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    EVS Translations

  • Scampi – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    30 Jul 2014 | 10:37 pm
    Scampi (plural) - scampo (singular) Scampi was a familiar catch in the Mediterranean. G L Faber, the British consul in Fiume was fascinated about fish and wrote various different works on the subject including The Fisheries of the Adriatic and the Fish Thereof in 1883. It is in this work that the term scampi was first introduced to English speaking readers.  Faber writes: “The famous scampo is caught off the Hungarian coast [and] the Italians catch scampi better on moonlit nights.”  Only a couple of years after its introduction to the English language, and another British official, the…
  • Hashtag – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    29 Jul 2014 | 10:29 pm
    The hashtag has slowly paved its way to becoming one of the most recognizable symbols of the last decade. The # symbol is nowadays a powerful marketing tool and best known as a hashtag, yet it used to be most widely recognized as a number, pound sign or octothorp. The story of the # symbol begins in the mid-fourteenth century, with the introduction of the abbreviation “lb,” (from the Latin libra pondo, literally translating as 'a pound by weight') for the pound unit of mass. Like many standard abbreviations of that period, “lb” was written with the addition of a horizontal bar, and in…
  • Chardonnay – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    29 Jul 2014 | 3:19 am
    Chardonnay is a small village in Burgundy and is the town that gave the grape its name. Wine lovers dispute its origins. However, it is clear that chardonnay was virtually unknown until 1980. According to Google Books, between 1979 and 2003, usage of the word chardonnay moved up by 700% from an admittedly low level. This simply reflects just how interesting chardonnay has become for people who drink wine. 30 years ago, there were just a few hundred acres of vineyards with chardonnay grapes in California. According to an ongoing study by the University of Adelaide, chardonnay is now the fifth…
  • Jade – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:40 am
    Jade is a word which appears in English via translations from various languages. In his The Discovery of Guiana which was published in 1595 Sir Walter Raleigh describes how easy it was to find gold in South America. In his somewhat exaggerated recording of the wealth of the countries, he translated from the Spanish “peidras hijadas”, to record “a kind of green stones” called in i.e. jade stones, which were used to “cure maladies of the spleen”. Only three years later in his Italian dictionary, John Florio described the “Iada, a kind of precious stone like an emerald”.  Jade…
  • Sake – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    25 Jul 2014 | 2:43 am
    Sake is the Japanese word for alcohol, although Westerners often understand it to mean rice wine, the traditional liquor of Japan made from fermented rice. The drink has been around for hundreds of years, with the first mention in Japanese going back to around 712 AD. Centuries ago, Japan was an island far away and there was virtually no contact with Europe. Dutch traders discovered the drink and got the word into English in a very roundabout fashion. The Frenchman Jean de Thévenot travelled extensively in Europe and the Middle East in the second half of the seventeenth century, as well as…
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    Speaking Latino

  • Survival Spanish Guide to Mexican Street Food

    Jared Romey
    28 Jul 2014 | 3:08 am
    What makes things complicated is that the names of many of the food either have another meaning, or sound like a word in English that really has nothing to do with them (false cognates). This guide is to help novice Mexican street foodies navigate through a market and order the food they want. Read More >The post Survival Spanish Guide to Mexican Street Food appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • 11 Argentine Spanish Phrases With PEDO (Spanish for Fart)

    Diana Caballero
    27 Jul 2014 | 3:34 am
    Pedo is probably one of the most versatile words in Argentina. Pedo literally translates to “a fart,” but colloquially it also has the meaning of “a problem.” Here are some examples of Argentine slang phrases that use the word pedo. 1. a los pedos: extremely fast, in a hurry 2. al pedo: something use­less, that didn’t need to be done, or that was a waste of time 3. cagar a… Read More >The post 11 Argentine Spanish Phrases With PEDO (Spanish for Fart) appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • Football Phrases in Spanish: What is Your Favorite?

    Diana Caballero
    10 Jul 2014 | 3:09 pm
    The World Cup is about to end. This past month I had a great time watching many of the matches here in Miami and also in Spain, where we spent half of the World Cup. Listening to the commentators in Spanish was so much fun; the phrases they used, the energy they had, and how they integrated their conversations with each other in order to deliver an entertaining transmission to… Read More >The post Football Phrases in Spanish: What is Your Favorite? appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • Flirting in Spanish: 18 Easy Spanish Phrases for Dating

    Jared Romey
    4 Jul 2014 | 12:09 pm
    In “Flirting in Spanish: 18 Easy Spanish Phrases for Dating” we’ve given you a few choice phrases that should be easy to remember and quick to charm. Read More >The post Flirting in Spanish: 18 Easy Spanish Phrases for Dating appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • The 5 Spanish Irregular Verbs That Will Boost Ability to Build Sentences

    Jared Romey
    16 Jun 2014 | 3:27 am
    These Spanish irregular verbs will improve your ability create sentences. Download the printable Spanish verb flashcards included. Read More >The post The 5 Spanish Irregular Verbs That Will Boost Ability to Build Sentences appeared first on Speaking Latino.
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    Translation Source

  • Hispanic Market Translation: Fast Facts

    Camilo
    31 Jul 2014 | 9:41 am
    The United States has the second largest Hispanic population in the world, after Mexico, and 1 in 6 U.S. residents are now of Hispanic descent.  Hispanics in the U.S. come from various countries of origin and the major unifying factor is the Spanish language. Many industries in the U.S. have a desire to connect to this growing market, making Hispanic Market translations more important than ever before. To help shed some light on the makeup, distribution, and presence of the U.S. Hispanic population, we’ve compiled a list of fast facts on the Hispanic market.   Distribution of the…
  • Multimedia Localization: How to and Helpful Hints

    Camilo
    4 Jun 2014 | 9:02 am
    From global promotional videos to an e-learning program for international training, localization is the key to effectively reaching a target audience. There are many factors that will determine how a multimedia localization project should be carried out and with numerous variables such as audio, video, timing, synchronization, and voice-over versus dubbing, the task can seem quite daunting. In order to help demystify this process, we’ve provided a list of how to localize your multimedia projects. Step 1: Transcription The first step in multimedia localization involves creating a written…
  • Make Your Translations Work for You: 3 Ways to Streamline Your Translation Services

    Camilo
    27 May 2014 | 1:45 pm
    Any company who has contracted translation services has undoubtedly pondered the issues of how to reduce costs, decrease turnaround time, and ensure quality translations. The good news is that most language service providers are dedicated to solving these very problems for their clients and will gladly work with you to implement translation memory, translation glossaries, and style guides to streamline your company’s translation projects. To help you understand how to make your translations work for you, we’ve provided an overview of three tools that when used together, can…
  • Brazil 2014: Fast Facts on Language Issues Presented by the World Cup

    Camilo
    9 May 2014 | 10:10 am
    From June 12th to July 13th 2014 Brazil will host the 20th FIFA World Cup. The mission behind this major event for soccer fans is to unite people through a mutual love of the sport and to foster understanding between cultures. Teams from 32 countries will participate in the month of tournaments. With them come their fans and other die-hard soccer lovers all of whom bring with them their own idioms and customs. The language of soccer may be universal but language service providers will be there to help tourists navigate the diverse terrain of Brazil as they follow their teams to one of 12…
  • OTC Houston: Top 10 Reasons to Attend

    Camilo
    25 Apr 2014 | 9:56 am
    With the variety of professional conferences held annually for the oil and gas industry it’s hard to decide what to fit into your busy schedule. The OTC (Offshore Technology Conference), held each year at Reliant Park in Houston, Texas, is one event that should definitely be on your agenda. To help explain why, we’ve compiled a list of the top 10 reasons to visit the OTC conference. #1 Unbeatable Location The fourth largest city in the U.S., Houston boasts a major international airport with over 150 nonstop flights daily. Houston also happens to be the seat of the oil and gas industry so…
 
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    Blog at Fluent Language Tuition

  • Sample Book Chapter: Mastering Writing In Another Language

    Kerstin Hammes
    28 Jul 2014 | 2:57 am
    The following text is a sample chapter from Fluency Made Achievable, one of the new Fluent Guides which are out just now! You can order the combo pack of both guides through my website now to gain confidence, improve techniques and become a successful language learner. Click here to find out all about the books.Writing Training: Composition Tricks for Writing in a Foreign Language For many language learners, writing is one of the most important ways that they connect with the outside world. You start the day updating your status on Facebook, maybe you sit in an office typing…
  • How To Run The Show in Language Learning

    Kerstin Hammes
    21 Jul 2014 | 6:13 am
    Reading a language learning blog is a funny undertaking, isn't it? You can find amazing community, new ideas and reviews of products that you have not tried yet. For many people, looking at the language learning successes out there is also a real motivator: When you feel like it's never going to be a thing to really learn 20,000 words in Japanese, it's nice to see others out there who have done it. img ©Purple Ghost Flower on Deviantart As a language teacher, I know how you feel. My Twitter and Feedly are full on inspiration for making lessons more interesting, helping students with grammar…
  • How Not to Learn Spanish!

    Jenny Brown
    18 Jul 2014 | 3:00 am
    Today I'm very proud to be featuring a guest post from Gareth Evans. I know Gareth as the marketing guy behind the awesome FlashSticks (which you know I don't stop enthusing about), and on discovering his language learning story I invited him to share his adventures in Argentina as a language learner. Gareth is on Twitter for FlashSticks and they’re always up for a natter on Twitter, so do say hello. And don't forget you can win them as part of the Sensational Fluent Pack until 10 August 2014.This story is awesome - it has everything! Language, travel, adventure, classes... Gareth…
  • My Authentic Philosophy Behind The New Fluent Guides

    Kerstin Hammes
    15 Jul 2014 | 4:32 pm
    If you have been following my little blog for over half a year, then this picture will look familiar to you: I wrote the little book Fluency Made Achievable in 2013, motivated by a desire to show everyone that "Language Hacking" is not the only way to succeed. Why shouldn't we ENJOY our study? Fluency Made Achievable was published on Kindle, PDF and even came out in print, but all along I wasn't 100% confident in selling it yet. I wanted to serve you guys a lot better - and then I took the decision to work on just that. You guys know that I recognise the frustrations and learning obstacles…
  • Rise of the Female Language Blogger

    Kerstin Hammes
    7 Jul 2014 | 7:31 am
    So This Is The World We Live InThe other day I was reading the back of my packet of breakfast cereal (a habit I've had since I could read) and noticed that the back of it is addressed to kids. A game, some fun suggestions, some ideas for a family day. One thing was striking: There were about 3 different references to "mum" and not a single one to "dad". img ©Daniel Zedda on Flickr As a woman who grew up in a non-feminist environment (Mama, I hope this is ok to say..) I am more than aware of the world today. Women are still expected to be quiet. We're not as visible on the salary scales, the…
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    Learn Spanish My Way

  • Getting Emotional

    Keith Walters
    18 Jul 2014 | 1:50 pm
    Previously, I talked about wishes, desires, and dreams using the subjunctive "mood" in Spanish. If you haven't read that yet, please do so here.Describing emotions and feelings is another way to use the Spanish subjunctive. There are countless verbs out there to indicate any particular emotion you and others have. Some examples are temer (to fear or be afraid), esperar (to hope), alegrarse [de] (to be glad or happy), sentir (to be sorry, to regret), gustar (to like), enojar (to be angry), sorprender (to be surprised) and odiar (to hate). You can use impersonal emotional expressions too such…
  • Make a Wish

    Keith Walters
    27 Jun 2014 | 6:00 am
    As I mentioned before, the subjunctive is not a tense, but rather a mood. It has its own tenses for present, imperfect (past) and future just like the indicative. Therefore, it is not a tense.One aspect for using the subjunctive is expressing wishes, desires, hopes, and dreams. You would not use the indicative because that is grounded in reality and certainty. Wishes and the like are part of the uncertain and unreal because they have not happened yet and there is a chance they will never happen. I by no means intend to be a buzz-kill, but where there are wishes, there is improbability -- thus…
  • Subjunctive in the Present

    Keith Walters
    20 Jun 2014 | 10:15 am
    I thought that before I get too far along with when and how to use the subjunctive, I would spend a little bit of time on how to form the subjunctive. I'll start with the present indicative tense.A great way to think of forming the Spanish subjunctive is imagine a place where right-side-up is up-side-down and right is left and up is down -- everything is the opposite. That's basically what you are doing with your subject endings.For verbs that end in -AR, you want to first conjugate the verb in first person (Yo form), then add the appropriate opposite ending for the subject you are…
  • Subjective Subjunctive

    Keith Walters
    7 Jun 2014 | 3:26 pm
    The subjunctive gives English speakers lots of problems. Mostly because it is not a visible "tense" in English, but rather a "mood" or a personal choice.Example in English: I want that you come with me to the party.Example in Spanish: Quiero que vengas conmigo a la fiesta.The above sentence has two verbs: want and come. They both look like they are just present tense verbs to any English speaker. It's the underlying "mood" or personal choice that distinguishes between whether a verb is subjunctive or not.In the example above, the first verb (want) is in the indicative "mood" while it is also…
  • Learning Spanish in the Digital Age

    Keith Walters
    30 May 2014 | 11:20 am
    How we spend our time these days matter to all of us. We live in a very different world than it was just a decade or so ago. Learning another language like Spanish has evolved too. In fact, 32 hours on average per month is spent scouring the internet in the United States alone. That's a lot of time online.Enter Lingocracy!This app claims to improve your language skills through reading what you want, when you want in a variety of languages including Spanish. Like most apps, you can register for a free account. You may also sign up using your Facebook account.Lingocracy does a few different…
 
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    Lingos Blog

  • 4 ways to boost your language learning in the Summer Holidays

    Emma
    30 Jul 2014 | 4:31 am
      Hurrah! Summer is well and truly here! Summer is a time to take a break from the usual churn of daily life. We feel more energised by the sun, the days are longer giving us a greater sense of freedom .. whether it’s time off work or school summer holidays we all feel like we have a little more time to do the things we enjoy. So, if learning a language is something which floats your boat, how can you boost your language learning in the summer holidays?   Option 1: Visit a Country – where the language you are learning is spoken. The summer break allows us a little more…
  • Languages and the World Cup 2014

    Emma
    20 Jun 2014 | 6:10 am
    Love it or loathe it the World Cup is here and will be dominating newspapers, tv and social media sites around the world for the next few weeks. So why not join in and use the World Cup as a language learning opportunity?! The Official languages of the World Cup or FIFA, the institution which organises the event, are: English, French, German and Spanish. FIFA was founded in May 1904. FIFA headquarters is based in Zurich, Switzerland and their motto is: For the Game. For the World. Below we have listed the words for Football, World Cup and the various World Cup slogans of each of the 32…
  • Hay una mosca en la sopa! I don’t know what the little words mean!! And conjugating verbs..

    Jessica Bonnard
    26 May 2014 | 6:45 am
    Well, I never thought that I’d be happy with anything less than 20 out of 20 but I am fairly delighted that I got 17 out of 20 new words right.  I wrote them out on cards, stuck a ribbon through the holes and hung them on the fridge.  I go to the fridge fairly often it has to be said – which may account for my success. I’m really fascinated by the expressions that I got wrong.  They are fairly close to the correct version and I bet that if I said them quickly I would get by (feedback welcome).  But why did I find them so hard?  Here are the three I found impossible to remember.
  • Do Sticks or Carrots keep you learning a language?

    Jessica Bonnard
    21 May 2014 | 4:24 am
    I haven’t been to my Spanish class for over a month, but I’ve got a good excuse. I’ve moved to France for a sabbatical to improve my French and (hopefully) to write a grammar book!  Surrounded by le French, I haven’t even opened my Spanish folder since I last wrote.  Well, I promised to share my language learning adventure, warts and all, so there you have it – I have done nada, nothing, not a sausage – apart from annoying people with my favourite new word ¡Caramba! whenever I can slip it in to the conversation.  But tonight I’ve looked on my web site and seen that…
  • It’s Festival time in France!

    Emma
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:56 am
    Post Easter sees the start of festival time in France. Little did you know that France has, and always has had, some amazing festivals which take place throughout the whole year but with a particular frequency in the summer months. Whole villages, towns and cities are taken over by festivals. Music festivals abound, there are film festivals galore but my favourite are the “théâtre et de la rue” – Street theatre festivals which are far more popular in France than in the UK. Every region will have it’s own variety of festivals taking place throughout the year so wherever you are…
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    Smoke & Croak

  • Q&A – Managing Currencies in International E-commerce

    Liam Curley
    8 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    I recently caught up with Neil Seymour, managing director of Challenge Trophies (@SportsTrophies). During the past four years, Challenge Trophies have been expanding their e-commerce business into Europe and Neil agreed to offer some valuable insight into the challenges of managing multiple currencies on an e-commerce website. 1. Tell us a bit about you and Challenge Trophies Challenge Trophies was founded in 1976, a family business originally set up as a retail outlet selling trophies, medals and awards to the local community. As Challenge Trophies evolved, we worked with increasing numbers…
  • 3 Minute Read – Translating your Slogan?

    Liam Curley
    16 Jun 2014 | 2:06 am
    3 Key points addressed: When should you translate your tagline When you can avoid translation How to manage a slogan translation Why do you have a Tagline? The title refers to slogans, but I prefer the term tagline. We’re talking about the line of text below your logo, on your literature and website. Before deciding on whether to translate the tagline for new markets, ask yourself why you have the tagline. What purpose does it serve? There are two types of tagline: The Abstract – this represents and conveys the brand values through a memorable and simple message. Take McDonalds’; I’m…
  • What Makes Google Tick?

    Liam Curley
    2 Jun 2014 | 4:25 am
    Want to improve your website’s ranking performance on Google? Before you build an understanding of the technical aspects of Search Engine Optimisation (SEO), or spend hours trying to find SEO blogs offering a magic ranking formula to crack the Google code (this doesn’t exist by the way), it’s worth trying to understand the core structure behind Google’s success. Billions of people use Google’s free search engine service to find high quality websites which are relevant to the type of content they’re looking for. Because Google has so many people spending time on their search…
  • Pick your favourite song for us to translate into Spanish!

    Liam Curley
    15 May 2014 | 4:42 am
    We got together with Pablo Muñoz, a popular blogger and rock star in the localisation industry to come up with the idea for our next song to translate. Some time ago, Pablo wrote a blog post on music to ask translators what their favourite track was to listen to whilst working. He had a big response from his audience. Now, we want to know what your favourite song is (in English). We want you to tell us what song you want translating into Spanish. Together with Pablo, we’re going to put together the most popular suggestions that you have and enter them into a poll for voting. The winning…
  • Naming A Business – The Story of Safe to Bold

    Liam Curley
    13 May 2014 | 6:14 am
    We’re a young business, so the challenges, debates and obstacles of naming a company are still fresh in the mind. It’s a huge decision to make, creating the semantic attachment that you’re going to label your business with. It’s on the sign that goes above the door, in your domain, and the name that you use to introduce yourself to people over the phone or in person. My wife recently gave birth to our first born son and deciding on his name was a much simpler process! Whilst there is always the option of altering the name (of the business, not the son) at a later date (Accenture, WWE,…
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    Inbox Translation

  • How to Deal with Rejection as a Freelancer

    Alina Cincan
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:25 am
    As exciting as it may sound, freelancing (whatever the field) is not always the idyllic career that people believe it to be – it can be stressful and unpredictable, but it can also bring a lot of satisfactions. It is the former aspect I’m going to tackle today. Anybody who has promised you a glamorous […] The post How to Deal with Rejection as a Freelancer appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • Mind Your Language? No! Mind Other People’s Language: How Not to Behave When Living in a Foreign Country

    Alina Cincan
    20 Jun 2014 | 12:19 am
    Fasten your seatbelt, you’re going abroad! But hold on, they speak a FOREIGN language! What to do!? Well, let me tell you what NOT to. The following are some lessons on how not to behave in a foreign country. For this post, I asked some of my friends (who moved to foreign countries without having […] The post Mind Your Language? No! Mind Other People’s Language: How Not to Behave When Living in a Foreign Country appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • ‘Love’ Rhymes with ‘Language’

    Alina Cincan
    2 Jun 2014 | 12:54 am
                You may be surprised, I know, To read this rhyming post today, And although I’m not a pro, I hope it will be OK. (So bear with me) When we saw the nomination In the bab.la competition, We almost needed resuscitation And thought we had an eye condition. (Pretty […] The post ‘Love’ Rhymes with ‘Language’ appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • 15 FREE Tools for Translators (and Not Only) that You Might Not Know You Need

    Flo Bejgu
    27 May 2014 | 3:03 am
    The advancements in technology have made it possible for people of different languages, traditions and customs to come into contact. As was expected, translators and interpreters quickly became essential for society, because they are the only ones who can make conversations between foreign individuals possible. Every translator in the twenty-first century will tell you that […] The post 15 FREE Tools for Translators (and Not Only) that You Might Not Know You Need appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • 5 Interesting Oddities and Rules of the English Language

    Alina Cincan
    13 May 2014 | 2:06 am
    The English language is fascinating, bizarre, and sometimes downright scary. It consists of the best and worst elements of ancient languages, and not even native speakers know everything there is to know about it. Nerds all over the world, from different times, have united to discuss the quirks, oddities and idiosyncrasies of the English language. […] The post 5 Interesting Oddities and Rules of the English Language appeared first on Inbox Translation.
 
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    漢字世界: A World of Chinese Characters

  • On character 化: more than life and death

    蕭郎
    31 Jul 2014 | 6:25 am
    What information you can find in the word “change” ? You may tell me it’s from old French changier, or […]The post On character 化: more than life and death appeared first on 漢字世界: A World of Chinese Characters.
  • The Unexplained: a woman with a big eyed creature

    蕭郎
    31 Jul 2014 | 4:33 am
    The character is a mystery for the scholars of ancient Chinese, and it hasn’t been explained today, maybe you could. […]The post The Unexplained: a woman with a big eyed creature appeared first on 漢字世界: A World of Chinese Characters.
  • The joy of sucking on the nipple: 熙

    蕭郎
    31 Jul 2014 | 2:47 am
    Pronunciation:  xī Meaning: adj happy, auspicious, warm, bright, amiable, prosperous Etymology: From left to right: oracle bone character, small seal character, […]The post The joy of sucking on the nipple: 熙 appeared first on 漢字世界: A World of Chinese Characters.
  • Chinese Idiom Story: 杯弓蛇影 |English-Chinese-Pinyin

    蕭郎
    31 Jul 2014 | 12:05 am
    In Jin dynasty, there was a prefect named Ying Chen. One day, Du Xuan, the secretary of the county went […]The post Chinese Idiom Story: 杯弓蛇影 |English-Chinese-Pinyin appeared first on 漢字世界: A World of Chinese Characters.
  • How long does it take to learn Chinese?

    蕭郎
    30 Jul 2014 | 6:45 pm
    The majority of Chinese learners expect to be fluent and be able to read Chinese text, if they do, they […]The post How long does it take to learn Chinese? appeared first on 漢字世界: A World of Chinese Characters.
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