Linguistics

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Idioms of the World

    The English Blog
    Jeffrey Hill
    29 Oct 2014 | 7:07 am
    This is one of a series of colourful images illustrating idioms from different countries. Each one has been translated literally into English and its meaning explained. You can find the others here, along with some interesting cultural observations (thanks to James, from hotelclub.com).
  • Arabic Translation History

    Globalization Partners International - Blog
    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Translation has always been the great enabler of communication between nations allowing for the transfer of meaning across daily business, cultural, and religious activities. Arabic translation has its deep roots in the ancient history of mankind. Arabic cultures have always had an intrinsic role in spreading knowledge and science across nations throughout the ages. Arabic translation dates back to the 2nd century, when Arabs translated Persian history into Arabic, and it went through several stages of transformation since then. From mere interpretation among the Arabic traders and…
  • When hearing aid users listen to music, less is more

    Language Acquisition News -- ScienceDaily
    27 Oct 2014 | 11:50 am
    The type of sound processing that modern hearings aids provide to make speech more understandable for wearers may also make music enjoyment more difficult, according to a new study. The findings suggest that less sophisticated hearing aids might actually be more compatible with listening to music, especially recorded music that has itself been processed to change the way it sounds.
  • Linguist jokes (5)

    Language Log
    Geoffrey K. Pullum
    28 Oct 2014 | 3:32 am
    I walked into the 7th-floor common room in the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences building at the University of Edinburgh yesterday and saw this message on the shared whiteboard: The past, the present, and the future walked into a bar. It was tense. Classy graffiti, I thought. This is a very intellectual place. And suddenly I realized that I haven't posted a linguist joke here since June 2006. And in March that year I had said that "I try to post one linguist joke a year, whether you need it or not." I am 8 years behind schedule! As I waited for the coffee machine to…
  • Ben Zimmer: Linguistics Journalism Award

    Language Log
    Victor Mair
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:16 pm
    My first thought upon reading the following announcement is that my colleagues and I here at Language Log headquarters hasten to claim Ben as one of ours (he doesn't just belong to the WSJ!): "WSJ's Ben Zimmer receives first LSA Linguistics Journalism Award" Here's the text of the LSA announcement: The Linguistic Society of America is pleased to name Ben Zimmer as the first recipient of our Linguistics Journalism Award. Zimmer is well-known for his linguistic contributions to mainstream media, most notably as the language columnist for the Wall Street Journal. The Linguistics Journalism…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    linguistics - Google News

  • Women's tech center celebrates first anniversary - Indiana Daily Student

    29 Oct 2014 | 9:32 pm
    Women's tech center celebrates first anniversaryIndiana Daily Student... Meghan McGrath, an information science master's student and the CEWiT graduate assistant; Kelly McGuinn, a computer science and cognitive science major; Charese Smiley, a Ph.D. student studying computational linguistics; and computer science major ...
  • Dordt College celebrates linguistics - Sioux City Journal

    24 Oct 2014 | 11:31 am
    Dordt College celebrates linguisticsSioux City JournalThe presentation, “Opportunities in the World of Wycliffe,” emphasizes that people from a variety of study areas and interests are needed in the field, not only linguists. Cahill worked with Wycliffe Bible Translators and was assigned to Ghana. He and
  • La scala di seta: negotiating ladders, linguistics and lighting cues - The Guardian (blog)

    23 Oct 2014 | 10:39 am
    The Guardian (blog)La scala di seta: negotiating ladders, linguistics and lighting cuesThe Guardian (blog)La scala di seta: negotiating ladders, linguistics and lighting cues. Greg Eldridge and his fellow Jette Parker Young Artists are putting on Rossini's farce La scala di seta at the Royal Opera House's Linbury Studio. With only four weeks to create a
  • What language tells us about the roots of the stone age diet - The Guardian

    22 Oct 2014 | 9:24 am
    The GuardianWhat language tells us about the roots of the stone age dietThe GuardianIt's all thanks to a painstaking technique called the comparative method. This is as archaeological as linguistics gets: it involves delicately scraping away the surface layers of spoken language to find patterns of relatedness beneath. For example
  • 'Washington Wars are the Biggest Terrorist Attacks' States Chomsky - teleSUR English

    19 Oct 2014 | 7:25 pm
    teleSUR English'Washington Wars are the Biggest Terrorist Attacks' States ChomskyteleSUR EnglishThe linguistics expert also criticised the series of “suicide” reforms, like the energy reform, pushed by President Enrique Peña that were recently approved by the Mexican Congress. The energy reform opened up the oil and gas industry to private companies.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Language Acquisition News -- ScienceDaily

  • Preventative action prior to brain surgery: Ultra-high-field MRI reveals language centers in brain in much more detail

    28 Oct 2014 | 5:23 am
    It is now possible, for the first time, to demonstrate that the areas of the brain that are important for understanding language can be pinpointed much more accurately using ultra-high-field MRI (7 Tesla) than with conventional clinical MRI scanners. This research helps to protect these areas more effectively during brain surgery and avoid accidentally damaging it.
  • When hearing aid users listen to music, less is more

    27 Oct 2014 | 11:50 am
    The type of sound processing that modern hearings aids provide to make speech more understandable for wearers may also make music enjoyment more difficult, according to a new study. The findings suggest that less sophisticated hearing aids might actually be more compatible with listening to music, especially recorded music that has itself been processed to change the way it sounds.
  • Group classes teach parents effective autism therapy, study finds

    27 Oct 2014 | 9:04 am
    Parents can learn to use a scientifically validated autism therapy with their own children by taking a short series of group classes, a new study has found. The study is the first randomized, controlled trial to test whether group classes are a good way to train parents on using an autism therapy.
  • Pleasure of learning new words

    24 Oct 2014 | 5:25 am
    From our very first years, we are intrinsically motivated to learn new words and their meanings. First language acquisition occurs within a permanent emotional interaction between parents and children. However, the exact mechanism behind the human drive to acquire communicative linguistic skills is yet to be established.
  • A new tune: There is intonation in sign language too

    23 Oct 2014 | 7:04 am
    Intonation is an integral part of communication for all speakers. But can sign languages have intonation? A new study shows that signers use their faces to create intonational ‘melodies’ just as speakers use their voices, and that the melodies of the face can differ from one sign language to another.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    LANGUAGE NEWS - Google News

  • Book helps to preserve Woods Cree language - CBC.ca

    30 Oct 2014 | 5:41 am
    CBC.caBook helps to preserve Woods Cree languageCBC.caA new book of stories features the Woods Cree language, part of a larger project aimed at preserving First Nations languages. Author Soloman Ratt says the goal is to ensure the Woods Cree language is not lost. "Helping to bring the language back is ...Preserving language through storiesRegina Leader-Postall 4 news articles »
  • Spanish as a Second Language, With the Accent on Fun - New York Times

    29 Oct 2014 | 2:01 pm
    New York TimesSpanish as a Second Language, With the Accent on FunNew York TimesMindSnacks' app has different games meant to help you learn the language. In one game, for example, you click the word on the screen to match the Spanish word you've just heard. You play against the clock while water is draining out of an on-screen
  • Sign language and song in 'Visible Language' at Gallaudet - Washington Post

    29 Oct 2014 | 1:10 pm
    Washington City PaperSign language and song in 'Visible Language' at GallaudetWashington Post“I want to communicate,” goes an early chorus of the musical “Visible Language,” and that fundamental message is delivered in song, American Sign Language and supertitles projected above the small stage at Gallaudet University. That range of expression ...Visible Language Book and lyrics by Mary ResingWashington City Paperall 3 news articles »
  • Navajo Nation presidential campaign in turmoil over language requirement - Washington Post (blog)

    29 Oct 2014 | 9:48 am
    NET WebsiteNavajo Nation presidential campaign in turmoil over language requirementWashington Post (blog)A requirement that the president of the Navajo Nation be fluent in the tribe's language has forced one candidate off the ballot, just a week before Election Day. Navajo President Ben Shelly on Tuesday vetoed a measure that would have eased the language ...Navajo President Vetoes Language-Fluency ChangesABC NewsThe Language Problem in the Navajo Nation Presidential ElectionGoverningNavajo president vetoes language-fluency changes in setback for candidate for Minneapolis Star…
  • How to Revive a Language With No Native Speakers - Slate Magazine (blog)

    29 Oct 2014 | 8:45 am
    How to Revive a Language With No Native SpeakersSlate Magazine (blog)As Los Angeles fourth graders know (because their curriculum includes the study of California Indians), the original language of Los Angeles is Tongva. This American Indian language (also called Gabrielino) used to be spoken in villages all over the L
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    English Experts

  • Como dizer “Haja Coração!” em inglês

    Donay Mendonça
    30 Oct 2014 | 3:30 am
    A expressão “haja coração!” se popularizou no meio esportivo, mas também pode ser utilizada em outras situações, onde fortes emoções estejam à flor da pele. Na verdade, trata-se de um bordão criado pelo narrador esportivo da TV Globo, Galvão Bueno, e, ao contrário do que muitos devem pensar, essa grande popularização não teve início em uma partida de futebol, por incrível que pareça. Vejam em detalhes como tudo aconteceu no trecho a seguir do site Globo.com. Em 1986, o então piloto da Lotus preta e dourada (Ayrton Senna) superou a Williams de Nigel Mansell por…
  • #128 Boletim: Quem se saiu melhor no debate?

    Alessandro Brandão
    24 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Hi there! Domingo é dia de votar, seja qual for o resultado das urnas espero que seja o melhor para o nosso país. Para o boletim de hoje, selecionei alguns tópicos e artigos do EE para que você possa exercer o direito ao voto com o inglês afiado. Bons estudos! Como dizer “Quem se saiu melhor no debate?” em inglês Aprendendo o vocabulário das eleições em inglês 13 frases em inglês sobre Política e Eleições Como dizer “Empatado, empate (técnico) (eleição)” em inglês Como dizer “mesário” em inglês Colaboradores Este boletim só foi…
  • Como dizer Em Pé, Sentado e Deitado em inglês

    Donay Mendonça
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Às vezes, algo que parece simples em inglês pode acabar se tornando um bicho de sete cabeças em determinados contextos. Este é o caso das ideias relacionadas a “em pé”, “sentado” e “deitado”. Os verbos stand up, sit down e lie down são facilmente assimilados no sentido de “levantar-se”, “sentar-se” e “deitar-se”. Porém, na hora de dizer, por exemplo, “eu fico em pé a viagem inteira”, “eu fico sentado o dia inteiro no trabalho” ou “ele está deitado no sofá”, a coisa muda de figura e surgem muitos…
  • #127 Boletim: Semana do saco cheio e outras expressões em inglês

    Alessandro Brandão
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Howdy English Experts readers! Depois de algumas semanas atribuladas, estamos de volta com o boletim. Selecionei para hoje algumas expressões interessantes, uma delas eu passei a ouvir principalmente de amigos que têm filhos em idade escolar. Você sabe como dizer “semana do saco cheio” em inglês? Confesso que eu não conhecia essa expressão, nem mesmo em português. Mas é como diz o ditado “live and learn”. Agora vamos aos melhores tópicos das últimas semanas. Como dizer “semana do saco cheio” em inglês Prepare to x Prepare for: Qual utilizar Como dizer…
  • Expressões dos Seriados: Put something to bed

    Alessandro Brandão
    14 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Hi everyone! A expressão de hoje é “Put something to bed”. Ela significa “acabar de fazer ou escrever algo (e mandar para a gráfica); colocar um fim em algo”. Confira abaixo os exemplos com áudio. This month’s issue is ready. Let’s put it to bed. [ A edição deste mês está pronta. Manda para a gráfica. ] Everything’s set now. Let’s put this whole thing to bed once and for all. [ Tudo está certo agora. Vamos colocar um fim nisso de uma vez por todas. ] Ouça o áudio: http://www.englishexperts.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Put-something-to-bed.mp3…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The English Blog

  • Cartoon: Halloween's Going To Be Hot

    Jeffrey Hill
    30 Oct 2014 | 12:05 am
    BACKGROUNDBritain is gearing up for a warm Halloween with a blast of hot air from the Continent bringing an unusual end to the month.The mercury is expected to start rising today (Thursday) before reaching 71F (21C) on Friday in the south making it the hottest October 31 on record. Supermarkets say instead of stocking up with soups and hot drinks they are gearing up for a run on barbecue foods this weekend instead. Tesco is expecting to shift 80,000 packs of barbecue pork ribs, 450,000 packs of party food snacks and six million bottles of beer. Read more >> THE CARTOONThe cartoon by…
  • Newsy Video: Google To Use Nanoparticles, Wearables To Detect Disease

    Jeffrey Hill
    29 Oct 2014 | 11:49 pm
    Google X — you know, the team behind Google's self-driving cars and contact lenses that measure glucose levels — is at it again. This time, the company's looking to tackle disease detection and prevention by pairing tiny, tiny ingestible particles with a wearable device that can monitor those particles. The concept itself isn't too difficult to understand. Certain diseases have specific biomarkers — in cancer, for example, diseased cells might have proteins not present in normal human cells. Google's nanoparticles would be crafted to target these biomarkers — the…
  • Words in the News: Punitive

    Jeffrey Hill
    29 Oct 2014 | 11:41 pm
    There is no evidence that tough enforcement of the drug laws on personal possession leads to lower levels of drug use, according to the government’s first evidence-based study. Examining international drug laws, the groundbreaking Home Office document published brings to an end 40 years of almost unbroken official political rhetoric that only harsher penalties can tackle the problem caused by the likes of heroin, cocaine or cannabis. Full story >> VOCABULARYSomething which is punitive is intended as punishment. • There are calls for more punitive measures against people who drink…
  • From the Archive #4: Better at English (2007)

    Jeffrey Hill
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:30 pm
    For the first few years of its existence, The English Blog mostly featured sites which were useful for learning English. Many of these have now disappeared, but one that is still going strong is Better at English. Better at English is devoted to helping non-native speakers improve their English. On this site you’ll find podcasts (with transcripts!), tips, and advice that can help you improve your English in as little as two minutes per day. The site is run by Lori Linstruth, who is American but works as a corporate language instructor, editor, and translator in southern Sweden. As an avid…
  • Idioms of the World

    Jeffrey Hill
    29 Oct 2014 | 7:07 am
    This is one of a series of colourful images illustrating idioms from different countries. Each one has been translated literally into English and its meaning explained. You can find the others here, along with some interesting cultural observations (thanks to James, from hotelclub.com).
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Language Log

  • WT[bleep]?

    Eric Baković
    29 Oct 2014 | 11:11 pm
    Those LLog readers who aren't already Radiolab listeners should give their latest episode on translation a listen. There are 8 stories packed into this one episode, a few about language and a few not-so-much, but all of them well-worth the price of admission. But I'm not just here to promote Radiolab. I'm also here to comment on something that happened in this episode that I am now very curious about (curious-enough-to-blog-and-solicit-comments curious, not curious-enough-to-do-some-real-research-of-my-own curious). There's a point in the show where one of the show's hosts (Jad Abumrad) warns…
  • They haven't proven they're not afraid of anyone not named Bumgarner. Or have they?

    Mark Liberman
    29 Oct 2014 | 1:54 pm
    Bob Nightengale, "Forget 1985, these Royals on verge of their own history", USA Today 10/29/2014: It's been a wild ride for these two teams. They had to win an elimination game as a wild-card entrant just to get into this dance. Now, one will be hoisting the World Series championship trophy. The Royals certainly haven't proven they're not afraid of anyone not named Madison Bumgarner. Considering that he just threw 117 pitches in Game 5, Giants manager Bruce Bochy reiterated, that he will not be starting the game. He likely won't be available to pitch more than two, perhaps three innings of…
  • Ben Zimmer: Linguistics Journalism Award

    Victor Mair
    29 Oct 2014 | 12:16 pm
    My first thought upon reading the following announcement is that my colleagues and I here at Language Log headquarters hasten to claim Ben as one of ours (he doesn't just belong to the WSJ!): "WSJ's Ben Zimmer receives first LSA Linguistics Journalism Award" Here's the text of the LSA announcement: The Linguistic Society of America is pleased to name Ben Zimmer as the first recipient of our Linguistics Journalism Award. Zimmer is well-known for his linguistic contributions to mainstream media, most notably as the language columnist for the Wall Street Journal. The Linguistics Journalism…
  • Chow Yun-fat

    Victor Mair
    28 Oct 2014 | 1:05 pm
    Hong Kong movie star Chow Yun-fat has fallen afoul of the authorities on mainland China for supporting the Occupy Center democracy protesters. It's interesting to see how the media report what he said about having his films banned on the Mainland. "'I'll just make less then': Actor Chow Yun-fat responds to alleged PRC ban for supporting HK protests"  (10/27/14) Chow Yun-fatt shows why he is a #HK screen god. Asked abt being banned on Mainland: "I'll just make less then" pic.twitter.com/sIhXGbfyEo — Yuen Chan (@xinwenxiaojie) October 27, 2014 The Shanghaiist report was…
  • Linguist jokes (5)

    Geoffrey K. Pullum
    28 Oct 2014 | 3:32 am
    I walked into the 7th-floor common room in the School of Philosophy, Psychology and Language Sciences building at the University of Edinburgh yesterday and saw this message on the shared whiteboard: The past, the present, and the future walked into a bar. It was tense. Classy graffiti, I thought. This is a very intellectual place. And suddenly I realized that I haven't posted a linguist joke here since June 2006. And in March that year I had said that "I try to post one linguist joke a year, whether you need it or not." I am 8 years behind schedule! As I waited for the coffee machine to…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    GoodWord from alphaDictionary.com

  • 10/30/14 - costume

    29 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. A style of dress characteristic of a particular culture or period, as the national costume of Serbia. 2. Clothing worn as a disguise, such as a Halloween costume or a costume worn to a costume ball.
  • 10/29/14 - thug

    28 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. A violent, unfeeling gangster, a brutal hoodlum. 2. A member of the gangs of Indian robbers mentioned in today's Word History.
  • 10/28/14 - druther

    27 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    (Slang) Choice, preference.
  • 10/27/14 - fricassee

    26 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    A dish made of poultry or meat, fresh or leftover, cut into small pieces, sautéed, then stewed in a gravy.
  • 10/26/14 - gonzo

    25 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    Bizarre, outrageously unusual, very 'far out', out-of-sight, off the deep end.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Fritinancy

  • Word of the Week: Furcifer

    Nancy Friedman
    27 Oct 2014 | 7:23 am
    Furcifer: A yoke-bearer; a fork-user; a rascal or scoundrel. From Latin furca, a fork. Furcifer is archaic enough to be ignored by the online OED, which gives definitions only for some of its relatives (furcate: to divide into branches; furciferous: descriptive of certain butterflies that bear a forked process). Furcifer’s heyday was the early 17th century, when English travelers to the Continent noticed that the Italians used a curious pronged implement at table. One of those travelers, Thomas Coryat (or Coryate), visited Italy around 1608, when forks were virtually nonexistent in England.
  • Excited for You to Take

    Nancy Friedman
    24 Oct 2014 | 7:11 am
    Last week the mail brought a sample of Dove Deep Moisture Nourishing Body Wash with NutriumMoisture [sic]. Yes, I puzzled briefly over “Nutrium” (the singular form of nutria?) and the “moisture” redundancy,* but that’s not what I want to talk about today. Here’s the package insert. “We’re excited for you to take the One Shower Challenge!” “Excited for you to take” is one of the newish “excited for __” constructions that I’ve been noticing in speech and writing. The Dove copy was my first encounter with the phrase in a commercial context, but it turns out to be more…
  • Harmless

    Nancy Friedman
    22 Oct 2014 | 7:30 am
    Whole Foods launched its first national ad campaign this week, using a new themeline: “Values Matter.” The ads, created by New York agency Partners & Spade, are upbeat and mostly unobjectionable. “Eat Like an Idealist,” says one. “Healthy Food Does Good,” says another. Then there’s this one:  “Grow Up Strong and Harmless.” But not armless, obviously. I … don’t get this. I mean, “Grow Up Strong”—sure, fine, OK. But how does one “Grow Up Harmless”? What could that possibly mean? “Harmless” has several dictionary definitions: inoffensive (“He seems…
  • Word of the Week: Quarantine

    Nancy Friedman
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:19 am
    Quarantine: A period of enforced isolation or restriction of movement to prevent the spread of infectious disease. From Italian quarantina, a 40-day period. “Quarantine” has spiked recently because of news coverage of the Ebola virus, which originated in West Africa—the virus was named for for what researchers believed to be the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo—and has spread to other areas, including the United States. NYTimes.com, October 19, 2014 From the Times story: So it has been in Quarantine Nation. As the Ebola scare spreads from Texas to Ohio…
  • On the Visual Thesaurus: Ish

    Nancy Friedman
    16 Oct 2014 | 10:02 pm
    My latest column for the Visual Thesaurus looks at ish, a flexible little suffix with multiple meanings that’s increasingly seen in titles (ABC-TV’s “Black-ish”), brand names (the Berkeley bookstore Bookish, the Oakland T-shirt company Oaklandish, the vintage-furniture etailer Chairish), and brand descriptors (anonymish). In some places, ish has even attained independent status (Ish Watch; Ish, a children’s book). Full access to the column is restricted to subscribers (only $19.95 a year!). Here’s a shortish excerpt: Bookish: This word has meant “literary” or “enthusiastic…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    languagehat.com

  • Modern Languages Open.

    languagehat
    29 Oct 2014 | 5:03 pm
    The latest XIX век post informs me, and I am informing you, of a wonderful new venture, a free, peer-reviewed, online journal called Modern Languages Open. The inaugural issue has all sorts of interesting-sounding stuff, like “Reading Intermediality: Lorca’s Viaje a la luna (“Journey to the Moon,” 1929) and Un chien andalou (Buñuel/Dalí, 1929)” by Paul Julian Smith, but of course I’m most drawn to the Russian material, “New UK Research in Nineteenth-Century Russian Literature” by Katherine Bowers, “Topographic Transmissions and How To Talk About…
  • Afghanistan’s Battlefield Slang.

    languagehat
    28 Oct 2014 | 5:16 pm
    War slang is always interesting; I’m familiar with the lexicon of Vietnam (being the grandfatherly baby boomer that I am), but I wasn’t up on the equivalent for UK troops in Afghanistan, so I was glad to find this BBC News piece. Soldiers, like mathematicians and jazz musicians, are masters at brilliant repurposing of ordinary words, e.g.: ALLY Term for a battlefield fashionista – desirables include having a beard, using a different rifle, carrying vast amounts of ammunition, being dusty and having obscene amounts of tattoos and hair. Special forces are automatically Ally.
  • Leister and Glutton.

    languagehat
    27 Oct 2014 | 5:19 pm
    I’m currently editing a book on the prehistory of Scandinavia, and as usually happens with specialized works, I’m picking up some new vocabulary. Both these words looked like they might be typos, but a dip into the dictionary validated them. A leister (pronounced LEE-ster) is a three-pronged spear used in fishing, and the AHD says it’s “Probably from Old Norse ljōstr, from ljōsta, to strike,” referring the reader to the PIE root *leu- ‘to loosen, divide’ (which gives us loose and lorn, among other words). The last citation in the OED entry (from…
  • Form and Shape in Maimonides.

    languagehat
    26 Oct 2014 | 2:19 pm
    Ludwik Kowalski posted the following question at Wordorigins.org: A theological paper that I am reading contains the following: “… Thirdly, there are those creations, which have form but no shape. These are angels, which have no bodies, but whose form vary from angel to angel.” What is the meaning of the words “form” and “shape” in this context? English is not my native language. But my impression is that these two words are synonyms [...]. Am I wrong? I responded: You can’t depend on the ordinary/dictionary senses of words when reading theological works; you need to be…
  • Happy 100th, John Berryman!

    languagehat
    25 Oct 2014 | 2:40 pm
    Sam Leith at the Guardian (this seems to be Guardian day at LH) has a wonderful appreciation of John Berryman, one of my favorite American poets, who would have turned 100 yesterday; as I told my brother, who sent me the link (thanks, Eric!), I have two copies of The Dream Songs (one of which is a gift from PF when he visited me in Peekskill a decade or so ago — thanks, PF!), and I should take them down a lot more often. Here’s a taste of Leith’s essay: Berryman is (relatively) unusual among poets because he’s funny. Daniel Swift, who has edited some handsome centenary…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Way with Words

  • Do Me a Solid

    Grant Barrett
    25 Oct 2014 | 9:01 am
    What’s in YOUR spice rack? Say you’re cooking up a pot of chili, and you need to add more of that warm, earthy, powdered spice. Do you reach for a bottle of KOO-min? KYOO-min? Or are you going to add KUMM-in? The pronunciation given in dictionaries may surprise you. Also: some people have a problem with using the word issue instead of problem. And if you’re talking to a group of men and women, be careful about using the term you guys. Plus, sharp as a “marshmallow sandwich,” the phrase “of an evening,” what your paycheck has to do with salt, and tips…
  • Etymology of Salary

    grantbarrett
    25 Oct 2014 | 8:51 am
    If you’re making a salary, be grateful that it’s paid out in dollars and not salt. In antiquity, salt was a valuable commodity, and the term salary comes from the Latin salarium, the portions of salt paid to Roman soldiers. This is part of a complete episode.
  • Youth is Wasted on the Young

    grantbarrett
    25 Oct 2014 | 8:51 am
    Let’s settle this once and for all: George Bernard Shaw is responsible for the sentiment behind the quote, “Youth is wasted on the young.” But Fred Shapiro’s Yale Book of Quotations indicates that the history of the saying isn’t so simple. This is part of a complete episode.
  • Singing to Improve Grammar

    grantbarrett
    25 Oct 2014 | 8:51 am
    When you have a habit of using a particular bit of poor grammar, rote exercises like writing out a script to practice may help you get past it. Practicing the correct usage by singing to yourself may work, too. This is part of a complete episode.
  • Proper Noun Tautologies

    grantbarrett
    25 Oct 2014 | 8:51 am
    Tautologies in names are pretty funny, like the Sahara Desert, which basically means “Desert Desert,” or the country of East Timor, which in Malay means “East East.” This is part of a complete episode.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Sinosplice » Life

  • Spartacus = Super Taka?

    John Pasden
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:39 pm
    Here’s a restaurant on Fuzhou Road () in Shanghai: So the Chinese name is , which includes a straightforward transliteration of the name “Spartacus,” which you can easily find on Baidu Baike and on Chinese Wikipedia, plus the word for “steak.” But somehow the English name of this restaurant is “Super Taka Steak.” How does that work? I’d love to hear theories.
  • Chinese Teachers: Use Your Chinese Names!

    John Pasden
    14 Oct 2014 | 6:25 pm
    Chinese teachers, please have your students call you by a Chinese name. You’re not helping them by calling yourself some easier-to-pronounce English name. I would have thought that this was obvious, but after all these years in the business, I can now see that it is not obvious to many otherwise well-meaning teachers. So I’ll spell it out here. (Please forward this to your Chinese teacher who doesn’t ask you to use a Chinese name in your interactions.) So why should students of Chinese call their Chinese teachers of Chinese by a Chinese name? I’m glad you asked……
  • Analysis Paralysis in Chinese Studies

    John Pasden
    8 Oct 2014 | 5:59 pm
    You’ve probably heard of analysis paralysis, but where does it come into Chinese studies? Studying a language is fairly straightforward, right? I’m referring not to being overly analytical about grammar, but rather about vocabulary. How can one be overly analytical about vocabulary? This is something that technology has made easy in recent years. Most of my AllSet Learning clients use Pleco or Anki to review vocabulary. Both have built-in SRS flashcard functionality, so doing occasional reviews pretty much solves that problem, right? Well, maybe… SRS drawbacks aside, certain…
  • Improbable Wifi

    John Pasden
    2 Oct 2014 | 5:41 pm
    I’d love to see a list of the most improbable places that have wifi in China. I had lunch at this little hole in the wall the other day, and snapped these pictures: Unfortunately I didn’t notice the wifi until I was on the way out. I do wonder how good the wifi was.
  • Missing Elevator Buttons

    John Pasden
    29 Sep 2014 | 6:40 pm
    I recently read China Simplified’s book, Language Gymnastics. It’s a great entertaining introduction to the Chinese language which combines Chinese and foreign perspectives. The book included this passage in chapter 4, which is aptly titled “Sorry, There Is No Chapter Four“: Enter a Hong Kong residential tower elevator and you’ll often discover buttons for floors labeled 3A, 12A and 15B–no doubt alternative universes guarded by daemons and fairies. Other times the 1st floor is renamed the “ground floor” (following British conventions) and the 2nd floor is…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    AJATT | All Japanese All The Time

  • Why Are You Acting Like A Deadbeat Dad Language Learner?

    khatzumoto
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:59 pm
    The day you stop sucking at the language isn’t the end of the journey, it’s the beginning. Universities pay full, luscious lip service to this. Graduation is called “commencement”, at least in North America. But lip service it is. Full lusciousness notwithstanding. It’s said that most peoples learning — in fact, all nonfunctional reading — stops the day they leave school. But you and I are not most people. And I didn’t come to give you lip service today. My lips are chapped; it wouldn’t feel good. Baby care doesn’t end at birth.
  • What Can the French Revolution and Austrian Economics Teach You About Learning Japanese?

    khatzumoto
    10 Oct 2014 | 11:59 pm
    So, I’ve been reading about politics and history lately. Voltaire’s Bastards, Amaury de Riencourt, David Deutsch (The Beginning of Infinity), stuff like that. And I came upon something of a…how can I put this… It’s fashionable — and even justifiable — to roundly dismiss many of the heroes and products of the English-speaking world. Stop riding Newton’s nuts, Leibniz was just as good if not better — better calculus notation and a kanji lover. Stop cupping Darwin’s eye…balls, he was just kind of OK; he had a theory but no…
  • How Can I Turn Big, Complex Decisions Into Binary Decisions, Just Like the Cool Kids? Decision Binarization In Action: A Real Life Example

    khatzumoto
    5 Oct 2014 | 12:01 am
    This entry is part 6 of 6 in the series The First World Problem is ChoiceSo, one time, I had to make an appointment with the vet, for my cats, to get special shots for them so I could take them overseas, by plane, and thus have them hang out with me…overseas, as one does, and then also safely and expeditiously return to Japan. Now, I had ten choices for an appointment time. No…wait, that’s not what it was. It was a massage place. I think. They actually come over to your house and do, like, sports massage (roll with it) and…anyway, yeah, I had, like, ten options. And…
  • Why Everything You Do Wrong Is Right

    khatzumoto
    10 Jul 2014 | 11:59 pm
    You are not a screw-up. You are not lazy. You work hard. Too hard. At things that don’t matter. You work hard at struggling and self-blame and self-hate. You work hard at worrying. You work hard at pacing the floor. You work hard at imagining terrifying, low-probability contingencies. You work hard on trying to force yourself, like a stubborn camel, to do things you don’t want to do in a way you don’t want to do them. And it doesn’t work. It almost never works. So what do you do? USE EVEN MORE FORCE! You tell the whole world your goals, in order to force social…
  • What’s Wrong And Right With Vocabulary Lists — How To Use Them Without Being Used By Them

    khatzumoto
    5 Jul 2014 | 11:59 pm
    So I met a German girl at a cafe today…actually, she was Austrian but, same difference. Anyway, we got to talking about books and  I gave her a book recommendation, and it came out that I’ve only ever read the book in Japanese, so I had to find out what the English title was. She was shocked (or maybe surprised…whatever, same difference), and she talked about how she could never learn Japanese. And I was like, no way, of course you could. Because, here’s the thing. I have a lot of positive stereotypes about German people. There was my friend and neighbour Wolfgang…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    separated by a common language

  • Descriptions in Twitter profiles

    lynneguist
    25 Oct 2014 | 4:44 pm
    When Twitter tells me I have new followers, I can see their name and self-description before I can see their location (if they've given any). So I play a little game of 'guess which country they're from' before I click through to see it.  I seem to be good at picking out the Americans (or at least North Americans--the Canada/US distinction is hard to make here--sorry Canadians), based on the style of the name and self-description. To be fair, I'm probably guided by the photos too. (Pick out the Americans at the airport is another fun and not-too-difficult game. There, you can see the red…
  • Henny Penny, Chicken Little, Chicken Licken

    lynneguist
    18 Oct 2014 | 2:38 pm
    While writing the other day, I wondered whether it would be widely understood if I used Chicken Little as a metaphor for a certain kind of language peever. It felt right, but I also knew the name Henny Penny (of the main character in the story--see comments for variations), both from my American childhood and from my child's English childhood. Then I got an email informing me that my Survey Monkey subscription had been auto-renewed for the next month. Which is to say, I had failed to notice the note in my (BrE) diary/(AmE) planner on Tuesday that said "UNSUBSCRIBE FROM SURVEY MONKEY". At that…
  • twang

    lynneguist
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:25 pm
    This is the kind of blog topic I love -- like the soup or bacon sandwich ones -- where I'm reporting on my slowly acquired reali{s/z}ation that there are subtle UK/US differences in meanings of certain familiar words. The meanings are so similar that they often refer to the same things. What's different is where the cent{er/re} and periphery of the meaning are. Because these differences are hard to tease out, we may go through conversations not reali{s/z}ing that we're not quite communicating. Of course, it's loving these kinds of things that got me to be a lexical semanticist in the first…
  • shallot

    lynneguist
    9 Sep 2014 | 4:48 pm
    Typically, as we've discussed before, two-syllable words from French are stressed on their first syllable in BrE and on the second in AmE -- BALlet versus balLET, BAton versus baTON, etc. (Please see and comment on the linked post if that's the issue you're interested in.)photo from: http://www.realseeds.co.uk/onions.htmlThis led me to wonder about shallotbecause it looks like a French borrowing (so many food words are), but the stress pattern is makes it look like it isn't:  BrE shalLOT versus AmE SHALlot or shalLOT. (You can hear them both in an American accent here.)  American…
  • herb

    lynneguist
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:03 pm
    When I started this blog, I wrote short little posts about things I noticed in British and American English. Few read them, and I usually managed to write three a week.  Since then, many more readers and commenters have appeared ([AmE] howdy! thank you!). As I imagine this larger audience responding to posts about X with "But what about Y?", I try to fit the Ys in.  Sometimes the Ys are other expressions that I could discuss; sometimes they are beliefs about language that may or may not have basis in reality. As a result, my posts have got(ten) much longer and less frequent. (The…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Mr. Verb

  • They came for the verbs?

    12 Oct 2014 | 8:44 am
  • Grad students take note ...

    4 Aug 2014 | 5:51 am
    Be sure to credit xkcd when you use this approach. (And check out the roll over.)
  • Attack of the homophones!

    31 Jul 2014 | 8:19 pm
    Delightful story in the always delightful Wonkette about a guy who got fired for writing a blog post about homophones, because it sounded too ... icky.  It kind of sounded like another word, you might say.  Of course they had to use the tired old "cunning linguist" joke, but at least with a good graphic.I did guffaw a bit (but daintily) when I saw their picture of an illustration the firee used in his blog post:I mean, the very first one is a really bad example!  Tell me you don't look at it and say [rɛd] ~ [rijd].  And BTW, ant ~ aunt only works for some dialects.It's…
  • "Interested in regional and social differences in speech? We are too!"

    22 Jul 2014 | 8:14 am
    Just got an email with that subject line for a study about how people identify speakers of different dialects:Our research team at the University of Wisconsin is recruiting subjects for research on how people perceive and identify dialects of languages people speak. If you’d like to participate, just visit this link, and you’ll hear speech samples and can answer questions about them, e.g. where the speakers are from and whether you think they have strong accents.  The survey will not work on a smartphone; please only use a laptop, desktop, or tablet.If you have any questions…
  • Wisconsin Englishes update ...

    25 Jun 2014 | 12:53 pm
    Word on the street is that Wisconsin Englishes will be on Wisconsin Public Radio in western Wisconsin tomorrow, on Spectrum West with Al Ross.And the Wisconsin Englishes Project website has been spiffed up a little ... various updates and a bunch of teaching materials, etc. You can check it out here.
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Learn French with daily podcasts

  • 2018 – Real Life French: 40%

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:08 pm
    Real life French Guide Welcome to your lesson of Real Life French. Each lesson we take a simple situation you may encounter in everyday life in France. Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :~
  • 2017 – Nouvelles tablettes (New tablets)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:05 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Apple a annoncé une nouvelle version de sa tablette, l’ipad Air 2, qui est l’appareil de son genre … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 2016 – Dépendant d’Internet (Addicted to net)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:03 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Un nombre significatif de jeunes adultes pourrait souffrir de troubles de dépendance à l’Internet…. Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 2015 – Avertissements (Warning signs)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:01 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Les avertissements pour les consommateurs relatifs au sport nécessaire pour brûler toutes les calories … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 2014 – Une sangsue (Leech)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 9:59 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Une routarde a trouvé une sangsue de 7,5cm qui a vécu dans son nez pendant un mois après … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Brave New Words

  • Twilight of the Eastern Gods

    28 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    This originally appeared in the Wales Arts Review Twilight of the Eastern Godsby Ismail Kadare 193 pp., Edinburgh: Canongate, 2014.translation by David Bellos from the French translation by Jusuf VrioniReviewer: B.J. EpsteinTwilight of the Eastern Gods is, at its heart, a novel about words and writing. It’s about telling stories, and the importance of literature. It is also an ominous tale about politics, history, and geography, exploring the Soviet era and its concomitant political beliefs. Since the time and place frequently are depicted as rather creepy here, writing, too, can seem to be…
  • The Typical Lament

    23 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    On recent evening, I got in the bath and picked up a novel that had been recommended to me. I was ready to relax and enjoy some pleasure reading. Unfortunately, I didn’t make it past the page of epigraphs. The reason was because the author quoted several sentences from a variety of other novels, none originally written in English, but of course didn’t mention the name of the translator.In other words, the author quoted Proust and Dante and some other writers in English, but failed to show any awareness of the fact that these writers had been translated to English, and that the quoted…
  • Translated Literature for Children

    18 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Listen to this brief radio program on translating for children by translator, writer, and chair of Society of Authors (and my former colleague) Daniel Hahn.I have said much of what he says, but I suspect he says it better!
  • More on the Nobel Prize in Literature

    13 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    If you can read Swedish, this article on the Nobel Prize gives a bit more insight. Thank you to Duncan Large, now the head of the BCLT, for sending me the link.
  • 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature

    9 Oct 2014 | 10:35 am
    This year’s Nobel Prize in Literature has been awarded to Patrick Modiano.Is this what you expected? What do you think? I must admit he wasn't on my radar!
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    English, Jack

  • On meeting 'otiose' twice again

    6 Oct 2014 | 10:30 am
    I asked Mark Liberman to have a look at what I wrote yesterday since I was struggling to get my head around the probabilities. He was kind enough to write the following guest post:Maybe a better way of thinking about it is this:Say the probability that word w_i will be selected at random from a collection of text is P(w_i). Then assuming independence, the probability that the next word will NOT be w_i is (1-P(w_i)), and the probability of failing to find w_i in N successive draws is(1-P(w_i))^NIf P(w_i) is 1/10^7 (one in ten million), and N is 1000, then we get(1-(1/10^7))^1000which is…
  • On meeting 'otiose' twice in a day

    5 Oct 2014 | 3:36 am
    Well, not in the same day, but certainly within a 24-hour period. As I was lying in bed last night, reading Charles Mann's 1493, I came across the phrase the otiose Percy on p. 78.As of this morning, I've read to p. 90, so that's about 4,500 words later. I also read a few NY Times articles, adding perhaps another 1,200 words. And then I set about to edit an article for Contact, the TESL Ontario magazine for which I'm the editor. Almost immediately, I came across a quote from David Crystal in which he wonders,whether the presence of a global language will eliminate the demand for world…
  • Climbing the grammar tree

    19 Sep 2014 | 12:04 am
    I've started a new blog called "Climbing the grammar tree". The idea is that I will respond to readings I'm doing for my doctoral studies, so check it out.
  • A title misparsed

    2 Sep 2014 | 2:23 pm
    This morning, I was reading this article at New Statesman, when I came across the following:Yet surely, when night after night atrocities are served up to us as entertainment, it's worth some anxiety. We become clockwork oranges if we accept all this pop culture without asking what's in it.The plural clockwork oranges suddenly threw into sharp relief the title of Burgess's book A clockwork orange. For some reason that I am unable to articulate now, if I ever was aware of it, I had always parsed that title like this:That is to say, I took orange to be a postpositive modifier of clockwork (like…
  • Antedating "determinative"

    19 Aug 2014 | 5:13 am
    The OED gives: b. Gram. determinative adjective, determinative pronoun, etc. (see quots.); determinative compound = tatpurusha n.1921   E. Sapir Lang. vi. 135   The words of the typical suffixing languages (Turkish, Eskimo, Nootka) are ‘determinative’ formations, each added element determining the form of the whole anew.1924   H. E. Palmer Gram. Spoken Eng. ii. 24   To group with the pronouns all determinative adjectives..shortening the term to determinatives.1933   L. Bloomfield Language xiv. 235   One…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Thoughts On Translation

  • When a client says, “Geez…that’s really expensive!”

    Corinne McKay
    29 Oct 2014 | 10:34 am
    A student in my online course asks, “What do I respond when a client comments that my rates are really high?” Good question, student! Because if you’re running your business the right way, someone, someday, and maybe even lots of people almost every day, will think that you’re too expensive. Which leads us to rule […]
  • Beyond the Basics of Freelancing: starts November 12

    Corinne McKay
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:00 pm
    The next session of my online course Beyond the Basics of Freelancing starts on November 12, and I have five spots open. This course is for mid-career freelancers who have established businesses, but want to earn more money, work with higher-quality agencies or direct clients, develop a clearer financial plan for their businesses and get […]
  • International development webinar: feedback and questions

    Corinne McKay
    14 Oct 2014 | 10:15 am
    This morning I presented a webinar for the ATA professional development series, entitled “Translating for the international development sector.” We didn’t have time to take questions, so if you have any, you can send them to me here. Also, if you have any feedback that you didn’t include on the evaluation, you can post it […]
  • How to decide if a translation specialization is viable?

    Corinne McKay
    13 Oct 2014 | 9:58 am
    A student in my online course asks: How do I decide if a translation specialization is viable? Hmm, interesting question, and one that nearly all freelancers have to grapple with at some point. Short answer: nearly any specialization is viable, depending on your marketing zeal and income needs. Longer answer follows. When you’re looking at […]
  • Freelance success: luck, hard work, or a combination of the two?

    Corinne McKay
    24 Sep 2014 | 1:06 pm
    It’s been interesting to read people’s reactions to my post about translator rants, and I always love a good and lively discussion. Here’s a followup: it seems to me that many translators look at “successful freelancers,” (with varying definitions of that), and think, “It’s easy to sit around and tell other, less successful freelancers what […]
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Global by Design

  • Is your global gateway stuck in the basement?

    John Yunker
    29 Oct 2014 | 4:43 pm
    When you welcome visitors into your home, you probably don’t usher them directly to the basement. Yet when it comes to websites, this is exactly how many companies treat visitors from around the world. That is, they expect visitors to scroll down to the footer (basement) of their websites in order to find the global gateway. Now I want […]
  • Bulgaria (at long last) gets it own internationalized domain name (IDN)

    John Yunker
    27 Oct 2014 | 1:09 pm
    Five years ago, Bulgaria applied for an IDN but was denied by ICANN on the basis of “string similarity” with the country code of Brazil. Here is the Bulgarian IDN side by side with Brazil’s ccTLD:  бг  br. String similarity is a complex and controversial issue. But Bulgaria refused to take no for an answer and, five […]
  • You say Sea of Japan. I say East Sea.

    John Yunker
    21 Oct 2014 | 7:31 pm
    Who said the life of a map maker isn’t interesting? Every other day it seems there is another disputed territory, which usually means another disputed name. I’ve already mentioned the Falkland Islands/Islas Malvinas issue. On the other side of the planet there is a dispute brewing over the Sea of Japan. South Korea maintains that the […]
  • Apple continues to neglect its global gateway

    John Yunker
    8 Oct 2014 | 12:56 pm
    Every time Apple updates its web design (which it did recently) I get hopeful that the global gateway will receive a similar upgrade. But this has not yet happened. Apple’s global gateway remains firmly entrenched in the use of flags. And that’s unfortunate. Flags are not the best icons for global navigation. They are fraught with […]
  • One probable beneficiary of Scotland independence: .SCOT

    John Yunker
    18 Sep 2014 | 8:15 am
    So today is the big day for the people of Scotland as well as the UK. One question that occurs to country code geeks such as myself is what country code domain would Scotland use if/when it became separate from .UK? It turns out that one domain is already available right now: .scot. However, this isn’t technically a […]
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Gilbane.com

  • Managing and Monetizing Paid, Owned, and Earned Content

    Clea Durrell
    29 Oct 2014 | 11:47 am
    How does your organization manage and value paid, owned, and earned content? Is there a strategy for each of the three types? A budget? If you are struggling with measuring the value of marketing related content you are certainly not alone – there is just no easy way to do it. In this session, Gerry Moran from SAP talks about the need for brands to manage and scale the three types of content together to engage customers throughout the sales cycle. Randy Woods from nonlinear creations describes a technique in use for modeling content and mapping it to online behaviors to get a better handle…
  • Speaker Spotlight: Jeff Cutler – Don’t try content marketing without content strategy

    fgilbane
    21 Oct 2014 | 1:25 pm
    As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference and will be sharing their complete answers with you here. This week we’re spotlighting Jeff Cutler, Content Specialist, JeffCutler.com. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event. Speaker Spotlight: Jeff Cutler Content Specialist JeffCutler.com Follow Jeff: @jeffcutler     Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content…
  • Speaker Spotlight: Rahel Anne Bailie – Content marketing and content strategy not the same

    Clea Durrell
    3 Oct 2014 | 5:52 am
    As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference and will be sharing their complete answers with you here. This week we’re spotlighting Rahel Anne Bailie, Founder and Senior Content Strategy Consultant of Intentional Design Inc. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event. Speaker Spotlight: Rahel Anne Bailie Founder and Senior Content Strategy Consultant Intentional Design Inc. Follow Rahel: @rahelab   Given that…
  • HTML5 Proposed Recommendation Published – Call for Review

    Clea Durrell
    24 Sep 2014 | 10:05 am
    HTML5 Proposed Recommendation published on schedule. The HTML Working Group has published a Proposed Recommendation of “HTML5.” This specification defines the 5th major revision of the core language of the World Wide Web: the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). In this version, new features are introduced to help Web application authors, new elements are introduced based on research into prevailing authoring practices, and special attention has been given to defining clear conformance criteria for user agents in an effort to improve interoperability. Comments are welcome…
  • Speaker Spotlight: Terena Bell – Multilingual challenges and the future

    Clea Durrell
    23 Sep 2014 | 6:41 am
    As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference, December 2 – 4, 2014, and will be sharing their complete answers with you here. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event. Speaker Spotlight: Terena Bell CEO In Every Language Follow Terena: @ineverylanguage   Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Web-Translations » Blog Posts

  • Watch out when using Google translate!

    Cassandra Oliver
    30 Oct 2014 | 4:08 am
    While using Google translate to double check my understanding of an email I’d received in German, I noticed that all was not as it should be. My German is a little rusty, and so I often use free online translation tools as a backup, to verify my understanding. I know the limitations of machine translation, and as I was only using it to double-check my understanding of the message, I wasn’t so bothered about the incorrect word order and questionable grammar in the translation Google produced: However, the incorrect translation of “Donnerstag” as “Friday”…
  • International SEO: Is server location important?

    Jennifer Rodgers
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:07 am
    Managing a successful international web strategy would be much simpler if one hosting company could host multiple local domains on local servers through a single control panel. Unfortunately, this is not the case. If you have purchased unique domains for the different languages of your website, you can: host all of your languages/domains in one country OR host individual languages/domains in the target countries Where should you host a multilingual website? It’s a question our customers have been asking us for years. Back in 2011, our MD, Daniel Rajkumar, blogged about server location…
  • 6 resources every translator should use

    Jennifer Rodgers
    14 Oct 2014 | 4:53 am
    Contrary to what some may think, not all translators sit alone in a dark room, typing furiously, using only a dusty old dictionary for reference. Translation has moved on! It is more than just one opinion, one draft, one dog-eared dictionary. Translators, like lawyers, refer to myriad sources to select the best terminology, cite examples of similar contexts, delve into background information, and so on. Six resources you should be using Your Internet Browser Everyone has their favourite web browser – learn how to use yours to its fullest, as you probably use it regularly. In Internet…
  • Terms Website Owners need to know

    Cassandra Oliver
    10 Oct 2014 | 1:50 am
    The post Terms Website Owners need to know appeared first on Web-Translations.
  • Infographic: What are websites made of?

    Cassandra Oliver
    3 Oct 2014 | 3:51 am
    The post Infographic: What are websites made of? appeared first on Web-Translations.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    A Woman Learning Thai... and some men too ;-)

  • Tim Ferris: How to Learn a Language in Three Months

    Catherine Wentworth
    27 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Can you learn a language in three months?… When revamping WLT I discovered several timestamped posts the never saw the light of day (WP gremlins working overtime). This is one. Gotta love this guy. Tim Ferris’ post, How to Learn Any Language in Three Months gets into wonky theories for learning languages. If you remember, back a few years I wrote about his previous advice in Thai Sentence Deconstruction. It received mixed comments. Just my opinion… In learning Thai, if you work hard, three months is barely enough time to attain a smattering of a vocabulary, start using simple…
  • So You Want to Learn a Language

    Catherine Wentworth
    23 Oct 2014 | 4:49 am
    The Mother of all Language Learning Resources… When I started researching on the Internet for Thai learning resources, I found more than a few sites with broken links. So instead of collecting sites with resources, I created a page of my own and called it Learn Thai for FREE. After all these years it continues to be a work in process, but the point is that I can lay my hands on links I found ages ago. Awhile back I came across So you want to learn a language, a treasure trove of language learning links. I have most (but not all) of the Thai resources covered on WLT. For Thai, go…
  • The Talking Thai–English–Thai Dictionary Update

    Catherine Wentworth
    20 Oct 2014 | 2:17 am
    The Talking Thai–English–Thai Dictionary Update… I’ve been known to bug Chris Pirazzi about this and that software and lately it’s been about his progress with a brand spanking new TalkingThai phrasebook, as well as the update to Talking Thai–English–Thai Dictionary. Only just yesterday I received a positive reply to both. Excellent. I’ll go into detail about the TalkingThai phrasebook in a later post, but for now, in the hands of the Apple gods is the latest update to the Talking Thai–English–Thai Dictionary. Chris Pirazzi: Apple’s iOS 8.x…
  • Thai Language Thai Culture: Fluency Practice Through Symbols

    Hugh Leong
    13 Oct 2014 | 3:45 am
    Language as Symbols… We start with an idea in our heads. In order to get this idea into another person’s head we use the magic of language. When we use language we turn the idea in our heads into a symbol, a symbolic noise that our mouths make that we usually call “words”. The other person catches these “words” with their ears at which point their brains interpret them. If they are using the same set of audio symbols as we use (i.e. the same language) then the idea which was in our heads, or at least an approximation of it, is now in the listening person’s head. I have…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Russian Language Blog

  • “Common Sense” Ideas You Need to Abandon in Russia

    Maria
    30 Oct 2014 | 12:10 am
    Image by Nina on flickr.com I don’t like appeals to the proverbial “common sense” in explanations. What is viewed as common varies vastly among individuals, not to mention groups of people. In this post I would like to concentrate on assumptions that we may take for granted outside Russia, especially in the Anglo-American world, that may not reflect Russian reality — or widely, sometimes incorrectly, held beliefs. Apartments are for renters Yes, you can rent an apartment/flat () in Russia, as you would elsewhere. However, what is called apartment buildings in the US…
  • Are Russians Educated? Da!

    Jenya
    28 Oct 2014 | 11:00 pm
    MSU by Eldar Vagapov on flickr.com How many of you have gone to college? Finished college? You may be surprised to learn that Russia leads the world in having the highest percentage of college graduates. According to findings by the Organization for Economic and Co-Operative Development, 54 percent of Russians between the ages of 25 and 64 have at least an associates degree. In comparison, the United States, which used to be ranked number one, was listed in 12th place with just over 40 percent holding associate or higher degrees. Canada, Israel, and Japan were second, third, and fourth. You…
  • Russian Breakfast: Not What You’d Think?

    Jenya
    27 Oct 2014 | 10:24 pm
    Image by Rob Boudon on Flickr.com One of the first things I noticed upon coming to America many years ago were the differences in what people ate for breakfast. The breakfast that I was used to eating could not easily be found – at first. Breakfast cereals seemed to be omnipresent. Visiting the local grocery store was interesting because there always seemed to be an entire aisle – sometimes on both sides – devoted to hot and cold cereals. When my husband first visited Russia, he automatically assumed that his breakfasts would include some selection of these cereals; he was…
  • Colloquial Praises

    Maria
    23 Oct 2014 | 12:19 am
    Image by Nikos Koutoulas on flickr.com If you took Russian — or any language, for that matter — you probably eventually arrived at a point when your teacher encouraged you to use words other than хороший (good) to praise things. Hopefully, you started using замечательный, чудесный (both mean wonderful),  восхитительный (delightful), великолепный (magnificent), прекрасный (great, beautiful), отменный (select, top-notch), отличный (excellent) and many, many others. However, if you only encountered…
  • Could You Be a Russian Skywalker?

    Jenya
    21 Oct 2014 | 10:53 pm
    So, you think you’re brave? Do you perform stunts that others won’t even try? Are you a photographer? Are you Russian? Is your name Kirill Oreshkin? A recent trend is growing in Russia among young adults and it involves taking selfies from atop some of the world’s tallest buildings, towers, and other man-made structures. In some instances these “Skywalkers” will climb over the edge of a building in an attempt to take the perfect selfie while holding onto the building with one hand. As one that is not particularly fond of heights, I could barely watch some of…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Polish Language Blog

  • What do you need to know about Ebola

    Kasia
    29 Oct 2014 | 1:44 pm
    What is the most popular topic in the international news these days? Most of you will probably agree with me that everyone talks about Ebola and how dangerously fast it is spreading around the world… Image by Antoon’s Foobar on Flickr.com Image by CDC Global Health on Flickr.com The outbreak of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) (wirusowa choroba Ebola) or the Ebola hemorrhagic fever (Ebola HF) – Gorączka krwotoczna Ebola- is becoming an international concern. This fatal and serious disease ( śmiertelna i poważna choroba) has reached Guinea, Liberia as well as eastern Sierra…
  • Great book worth reading…

    Kasia
    15 Oct 2014 | 3:31 pm
    There are so many amazing Polish books…I don’t even know which one to really recommend and choose. However, few years ago, I have read a book about Polish migration to USA and I have to say that it is really, really worth reading. The story’s factual content reads like a documentary of ocean travel at the end of the 19th Century. The reader will become familiar with the details of traveling by sail in 1869 – the conditions of travel as well as the physical and emotional problems the passengers. The story is told mostly through the eyes of a newlywed couple, Paul…
  • Poland’s linguistic affiliation

    Kasia
    9 Oct 2014 | 3:40 pm
    Polish belongs to the west Slavic group of languages of the Indo-European language family, which in turn is part of the Nostratic macrofamily. Poles use the Latin alphabet. Literary Polish developed during the sixteenth century and is based on the speech of educated city people, upper class usage, and the Great Polish and Little Polish Dialects. Starting in the nineteenth century, technological and cultural changes introduced a new vocabulary. During the 1920s and 1930s, there was an attempt to coin and introduce a Polish-derived vocabulary for the newly diffused technology. Otherwise, the…
  • Which soft drinks Poles like the most?

    Kasia
    8 Oct 2014 | 4:24 pm
    We all know that anytime people think about Poles and their drinking habits – vodka screams at us! Yes, part of it is true. Just like each country has specific food and drinks that is popular there. Poles are used to drinking shots of vodka…but I have to say that usually opinion about it is exaggeration. Now how about soft drinks? Which ones are popular in Poland? I can definitely tell you that when I was growing up…I barely tasted soda. Kompot (compote) has been always on the table. Image by funtik.cat on Flickr.com Compotes are drinks prepared of fruits – usually fresh,…
  • Polish cuisine in the history

    Kasia
    3 Oct 2014 | 12:23 pm
    The Polish cuisine (kuchnia polska) in the Middle Ages was based on dishes made of agricultural produce (millet, rye, wheat – proso, żyto, pszenica), meats of wild and farm animals and fruits, herbs and local spices. It was known above all from abundant salt using and permanent presence of groats (kasze). A high calorific value of dishes and drinking the beer as a basic drink (unlike the wine spread in south and west Europe) was typical of Middle Ages Polish cuisine. A beer and a mead (piwo i miód pitny) were most popular drink for a lot of time, but with time an expensive wine,…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Ingls na Ponta da Lngua

  • O que significa eventually?

    Denilso de Lima
    29 Oct 2014 | 9:21 pm
    Você gosta de assistir a filmes e seriados para aprender inglês? Se sim, eu acho que você já deve ter visto que vira e mexe o pessoal traduz a palavra eventually como eventualmente. Mas, você sabia que isso está errado!? Sim! Errado! Nesta dica você... Quer continuar aprendendo mais e assim ficar com seu Inglês na Ponta da Língua? Então, continue lendo esta dica diretamente no site. Você certamente aprenderá muito mais!
  • Phrasal Verbs com Do

    Denilso de Lima
    28 Oct 2014 | 6:46 pm
    Depois dos Phrasal Verbs com Make, várias pessoas pediram uma lista de phrasal verbs com do. Portanto, atendendo a esses pedidos seguem abaixo alguns phrasal verbs com do que você deve ter na ponta da língua. » Quer aprender a aprender phrasal... Quer continuar aprendendo mais e assim ficar com seu Inglês na Ponta da Língua? Então, continue lendo esta dica diretamente no site. Você certamente aprenderá muito mais!
  • Quando usar Could, Was able to e Managed to

    Denilso de Lima
    23 Oct 2014 | 11:40 am
    Could, was able to e managed to são palavras (expressões) que em termos gramaticais costumam confundir muitos estudantes. Isso acontece porque as três podem ser traduzidas da mesma maneira. Nesta dica, você aprenderá quando usar could, was able ou... Quer continuar aprendendo mais e assim ficar com seu Inglês na Ponta da Língua? Então, continue lendo esta dica diretamente no site. Você certamente aprenderá muito mais!
  • O que significa bite the bullet?

    Denilso de Lima
    22 Oct 2014 | 10:11 pm
    Bite the bullet é mais uma daquelas expressões idiomáticas que vira e mexe você poderá ouvir alguém usando em inglês. Portanto, para não ser pego de surpresa, continue lendo esta dica para saber o que significa bite the bullet. A expressão bite the... Quer continuar aprendendo mais e assim ficar com seu Inglês na Ponta da Língua? Então, continue lendo esta dica diretamente no site. Você certamente aprenderá muito mais!
  • Pronunciation Tip: Avoid the Extra Syllable

    Denilso de Lima
    21 Oct 2014 | 2:04 pm
    Nesta dica a professora estadunidense (tem gente que se irritará se eu escrever americana!) Kristen Hammer dá uma dica bem legal de pronúncia. A dica é sobre aquilo que chamamos de vogal de apoio. Ou seja, muitos brasileiros ao pronunciar palavra... Quer continuar aprendendo mais e assim ficar com seu Inglês na Ponta da Língua? Então, continue lendo esta dica diretamente no site. Você certamente aprenderá muito mais!
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Babel's Dawn

  • Bickerton: Round Two

    Blair
    12 Oct 2014 | 12:59 pm
    A few years back Derek Bickerton published a book called Adam's Tongue which I reviewed in three posts (here, here and here). That book was disappointingly breezy, a lively account that made bold assertions and brushed objections aside with the swat of a hand. Say this for the guy, he's willing to keep plugging. Earlier this year he published an entirely non-breezy account of his theory: More than Nature Needs — Language, Mind, and Evolution. After reading the book I went back and read my old posts on the first work. I find that the theory has changed only a bit but the process is much more…
  • The End of Orthodoxy?

    Blair
    5 Oct 2014 | 6:49 pm
    Rejecting Aristotle is always a sign of a break with scientific orthodoxy. The past month has been bad for orthodox linguists. First came the Surprise Meeting at the Summit which showed that instead of searching for new empirical data or even new theoretical arguments (metaphysics), orthodox linguistics has turned to politics to patrol its turf. Next came two consecutive posts (here and here) on a paper reporting a review of empirical studies that indicates brain circuitry divides language into a basic syntax that deals with the concrete world that one can point to, and an extended syntax…
  • Syntax Eases Communication (Well duh)

    Blair
    29 Sep 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Yesterday I posted [here] a description of Maggie Tallerman's retort [abstract here] to the thought-firsters' idea that language evolved as a means of improved thought by allowing concepts to combine; we only later developed a way to externalize the thought as speech or signing. In that post I presented Tallerman's argument that words and concepts are not interchangeable and that words alone have properties that allow meaningful combinations. They get those properties via common usage. Today I want to look at her treatment of syntax. Basically, she makes the same point: the rules of syntax…
  • Chasing Leprechaun Gold

    Blair
    28 Sep 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Have linguists been hunting for a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow? The argument in favor of language beginning as personal thought is now dead and should be buried. What? You have always assumed language began as a tool for telling things to one another? You must be new to this blog. At the start of this month I posted a report on a paper by Bolhuis et al. that rehashes the argument that language began as a new and improved way of thinking. Speech and signing came only later when internal thinking was "externalized." Technically speaking, there was a mutation that improved the way an…
  • Dolphins Know Each Other by Name

    Blair
    15 Sep 2014 | 3:23 pm
    Signature whistles can be heard in a variety of dolphin species. Suppose I had an eight-month old baby who liked to say something like gork, and I told you that one day I heard the baby's two-year-old brother make a perfect imitation of the gork sound, to which the baby responded, hello. Would you conclude from this evidence that the baby is already using language? Careful, for it seems that bottlenose dolphins can participate in these sorts of exchanges. While most people agree that only people use language, there does not appear to be nearly as much agreement on what makes language so…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Macmillan

  • Language tip of the week: school

    Liz Potter
    30 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in usage in American and British English of the... [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • New pragmatics lesson plan: ways of warning people

    Liz Potter
    28 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Have you seen our latest lesson plan by author Jonathan Marks? This new resource is part of the ‘expressing yourself’ series and helps learners review and consolidate ways of warning people. What’s included? Worksheets for students, tips for teachers, as well as an answer key and suggested follow-up activities. All pragmatics... [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Mildew all around me, and other mondegreens

    Stan Carey
    27 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Misheard song lyrics have been in my head again. Kerry Maxwell’s BuzzWord article on creep as a combining form reminded me of the memorably rude example ‘I drove all night, crapped in your room’ – instead of crept. Then a Twitter friend mentioned ‘Poppadum Creek’, a surreal misanalysis of Madonna’s lyric ‘Papa Don’t Preach’, and […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Language and words in the news – 24th October, 2014

    Liz Potter
    24 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Language tip of the week: conversation

    Liz Potter
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this new series of  language tips we will be looking at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about conversation: A conversation or discussion […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    "I kinda like languages" blog

  • Guest Post: 3 Ways to Learn A New Language When Traveling

    lyzazel
    21 Oct 2014 | 3:48 pm
    When you’re out there exploring the world on a different ground, language serves as your key, your bridge, your freedom. This means your ability to communicate your intentions in any place or conversation in a foreign land to fulfill your goal whether you are there for work, education, or leisure. Learning a foreign language might not be a walk in the park but every step taken can be a milestone for travelers like you. Here are six language learning strategies you can try while on the road. 1. Bring in the words into your daily activities. Developing your passive skills is the easiest way…
  • Common European Languages Framework (CEFR) and Vocabulary Size

    lyzazel
    2 Sep 2014 | 4:23 am
    The Common European Languages Framework does not provide a clear vocabulary size for any of its levels, so we do not know how many knows words are expected at each level. Milton and Alexiou have attempted to do that in 2009, however (source: Milton J and T. Alexiou (2009). Vocabulary size and the Common European Framework of Reference in Languages. In B.Richards, H. Daller, D. Malvern, P. Meara, J. Milton and J. Treffers-Daller (eds), Vocabulary studies in first and second language acquisition. Palgrave: Macmillan, 194-211.). Here’s their table for English and French, with the addition…
  • Bosley’s New Friends – Children Book in Japanese Review

    lyzazel
    8 Jun 2014 | 5:44 am
    I got my hands of the Japanese edition of the book Bosley’s New Friends by The Language Bear for the purpose of reviewing it. The book is very short, but it seems like an interesting way for children (and perhaps even adults) to learn Japanese: it uses simple phrases, has bilingual translations and uses lovely imagery. Here are some pictures of the book that I have taken: One feature I have liked is highlighted words. Each page has one or a couple of key words highlighted, making it easy to distinguish them in the Japanese and English texts. Sometimes the book even uses a few colors in…
  • How To Learn Russian through Interlinear translations

    lyzazel
    15 Feb 2014 | 4:46 pm
    Those who know about this blog, possibly also know that I have been involved in trying to write about ways to learn Russian. I have also made a short Russian course and a Russian alphabet course. I would now like to present to my readers another way for one to learn or improve  Russian – reading a Russian Interlinear translation of Tolstoy. The translation includes the entire story “The Death of Ivan Ilyich” in the Interlinear format, where each phrase or expression is translated to English right below it. Here’s an example of the translation:   Example of the…
  • Guestpost: Language Exchanges – Do They Really Work?

    lyzazel
    27 Nov 2013 | 3:24 pm
    Language exchanges are becoming increasingly popular as a cost-effective (usually free) way to learn a new language. I’d never really considered using them, until I moved to Taiwan. To be honest, with you, they were very low on my radar for actively seeking out a language exchange partner. In the past, I’d found living in a different country and just assimilating myself a good way to learn a new language. However, I became more curious about them when a friend was telling me about his experience. His Chinese at the time seemed fairly proficient, and I was impressed that he’d got to his…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Pimsleur Approach Blog

  • Are You Afraid of the Bogeyman? Explore The World’s Most Frightening Mythical Monsters…If You Dare!

    Laura Mundow
    28 Oct 2014 | 6:06 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com It’s that time of year again: the barrier between our world and the underworld grows thin, witches and goblins roam the streets and children eat mountains and mountains of candy. Happy Halloween! Although Halloween is the time to think about all things supernatural, there is one creature which has the ability to strike fear in the hammering hearts of Americans year-round: the bogeyman! Generations of children have been scared into bed or into eating their dinner or simply into behaving with the threat of the bogeyman. It turns out that parents are…
  • Perfecting the Art of Language Learning: A Story Told by Pimsleur’s Customer of the Month

    Pimsleur Approach
    21 Oct 2014 | 6:16 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot comA multilingual employee is a desirable employee. This truism has never been more relevant than it is today as increasing numbers of employers are seeking workers who can communicate in more than one language. As traditional borders break down thanks to the use of digital technologies, it has become increasingly obvious that where a company is geographically located has little to do with where its clients will be based. Pimsleur’s customer of the month, Teresa Leon, is very aware of this fact and has taken proactive steps to broaden her skill set.
  • Battle of the Languages: Mandarin vs. Cantonese – What Language is Right for You?!

    Lukasz Wilkowski
    14 Oct 2014 | 7:43 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com It can be tough choosing what language to learn, especially when it comes to Chinese. There are a multitude of factors to consider. Do you want to use the language for business or socializing, or are you learning purely for fun? Where and when do you plan to use it? What difficulties does each language pose? And the most important question of them all: Which language is the right one for you? And don’t think you’ll get by all over China by learning just one of them. Although Mandarin and Cantonese share the same written characters, the pronunciations…
  • The Ultimate Guide to Hassle-Free Shopping in London

    Pimsleur Approach
    7 Oct 2014 | 6:58 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com As any Englishman or frequent visitor will attest, London attracts a plethora of tourists. Of course, the summer months and Christmas are particularly hectic, but given the year-round influx of out-of-towners, London is always a very busy place. This can make shopping and getting around pretty stressful, particularly if you’re trying to navigate the heaving throngs around Oxford Circus, home to the perma-mobbed Topshop flagship store. But it is possible to dodge the crowds; locals know how to avoid the masses when they need to get in a bout of weekend…
  • Happy Birthday Moulin Rouge! Celebrate 125 Years of a Legendary Paris Landmark

    Laura Mundow
    2 Oct 2014 | 7:03 am
    Image Credit: commons.wikimedia.org On October 6, 1889, Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller in the Pigalle district of Paris opened the Moulin Rouge cabaret. It opened the same year as the Eiffel Tower was built, and both have become legendary, enduring and unmistakable symbols of Paris. Moulin Rouge has survived the death of the Belle Époque, two World Wars, economic and political crises, a devastating fire and multiple changes of purpose. Yet today, it stands unbowed, world famous and thriving and subject of countless movies, books and documentaries, including, of course, Baz Luhrmann’s…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Globalization Partners International - Blog

  • The GPI Translation Services API

    27 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    The Globalization Partners International (GPI) Translation API is a technology agnostic platform which enables companies from around the world to better work with GPI in providing high quality, professional translation services.  The new API is capable of working with any type of system regardless of our customers' technology investments (i.e. Websites, Software, Mobile Applications or Content Management Systems).   By leveraging the GPI Translation API, you can easily integrate your applications directly into GPI's award winning suite of translation services and tools including our…
  • Tipping Around the Globe

    22 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    What should you expect? In the US tipping for services is the norm whether waiters, bellman, concierge, valets, etc… This is not always the case in other parts of the world.   Tipping Norms Change While it is well known that typical tipping for wait staff in restaurants and bartenders in the USA for good service is 15 to 20%, when faced with tipping in other situations and when traveling overseas people are often confused as to what the local expectations or norms are. For some services the 'norm' is perhaps changing. In the US tipping for taxi service was often considered to be 10% of…
  • Globalization Partners International – A Sitecore Technology Partner

    21 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Selecting the right web content management system (CMS) for customer experience management is a critical step in your online digital strategy. Many factors need to be considered before determining the right solution for your company. If you are considering deploying multilingual content in additional to English the considerations and feature set are even more complex. About Sitecore Web Content Management System Sitecore is a highly scalable Microsoft .NET based Content Management System which is ideally suited for website managers and content creators looking to easily author and publish…
  • Arabic Translation History

    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Translation has always been the great enabler of communication between nations allowing for the transfer of meaning across daily business, cultural, and religious activities. Arabic translation has its deep roots in the ancient history of mankind. Arabic cultures have always had an intrinsic role in spreading knowledge and science across nations throughout the ages. Arabic translation dates back to the 2nd century, when Arabs translated Persian history into Arabic, and it went through several stages of transformation since then. From mere interpretation among the Arabic traders and…
  • Website Translation with GPI and EPiServer

    5 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Multilingual Website Solutions with EPiServer EPiServer CMS is a fantastic Web Content Management System that supports multilingual websites and derives its strong capabilities from its Microsoft .NET Platform. EPiServer's latest version 7.5 provides a great set of options to support and manipulate multiple languages not only for content but also for EPiServer's new e-Commerce version. EPiServer users now can easily enable and manage multi-language output for Pages, Shared blocks, Local blocks and also e-Commerce Catalogs. As a Certified EPiServer Solution Partner, GPI helps EPiServer clients…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Lexiophiles

  • Bab.la Language World Cup: Ready for the Next Round!

    Benedetta
    30 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Here we are, 16 matches later, bab.la Language World Cup  is still on and the best has yet to come. The fans have been very enthusiastic and we have had 27,000 votes so far!     The 1/16 finals finished yesterday, let’s have a look at the matches and their results: Click on the image to enlarge So, the languages which made it to the 1/8 finals are German, Greek, English, Thai, French, Danish, Spanish, Dutch, Italian, Swahili, Portuguese, Russian, Swedish, Esperanto, Japanese and Polish. The 1/8 finals have just started, that means that 8 exciting matches are ahead of us!
  • Translations Shaping History: the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

    Jennifer
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:01 am
    We have all heard about the funny results from machine translators in signs, restaurant menus or even badly thought out slogans that simply don’t translate well in another culture. This is not a modern problem, however. If anything, we could argue that it used to be much worse; translators today have all kind of resources available to help in their work. Until not so long ago, translation was an even more arduous task, and those who took upon the task had to rely solely on their own knowledge and judgement, and the limited tools at the reach of their hands. This gave rise to many…
  • Traducciones que hacen Historia

    Jennifer
    29 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Todos hemos visto los entretenidos resultados que surgen de utilizar traducciones automáticas en carteles, menús de restaurantes, o incluso esloganes publicitarios que simplemente no tienen el mismo efecto en otra cultura. Sin embargo, esto no es un problema moderno. En cualquier caso, se podría decir que solía ser mucho peor; hoy en día un traductor cuenta con infinidad de recursos a su alcance para realizar su trabajo. Hasta no hace mucho, traducir era una tarea mucho más ardua y los el que se diese a ella dependía exclusivamente de su propio conocimiento y juicio, y de las limitadas…
  • 5 Good Reasons to Work in Germany

    Laurine
    28 Oct 2014 | 2:01 am
    After looking at 5 reasons why you should look for a job in France, let’s have a look at the advantages you will benefit from if you work in Germany. Income taxes Unlike France, the net salary you get at the end of the month is after taxes. The income tax is deducted from the gross income by your employer, so you do not need to take care of it. This makes life so much easier! However, at the end of the year, you can fill in the income tax declaration. It is usually worth it as nine out of ten people get a refund for having paid too many taxes. Unemployment The unemployment rate in Germany…
  • 5 bonnes raisons de travailler en Allemagne

    Laurine
    28 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Après avoir listé 5 bonnes raisons de travailler en France, voici 5 bonnes raisons de venir travailler en Allemagne. Les impôts sur le revenu Contrairement à la France, les impôts sur le revenu ont déjà été prélevés du salaire par l’employeur. Plus besoin de stresser quand le mois de septembre arrive ! Cependant, à la fin de l’année, vous pouvez remplir une déclaration d’impôts. C’est même recommandé puisque neuf personnes sur dix reçoivent un remboursement car trop d’impôts leur ont été prélevés. Le chômage Le taux de chômage en Allemagne est l’un des…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Dado Que - Latest Content

  • Urban Dictionary

    29 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    I’ll give you a little tip concerning slang: the best ‘Spanish slang dictionary’ in the world is… ready?… Urban Dictionary. I’m not kidding. I’ve tried everything that calls itself a ‘Spanish slang dictionary’, hard copy books and online, and none of them compare to Urban Dictionary. You’ll be amazed how much is in there, try looking up any Spanish slang you can think of, in all likelihood it’s in there–there’s Colombian slang, Mexican slang, Argentinean slang, Spanish (i.e. Iberian, from Spain) slang, everything. [annotation by Andrew of How to Learn Spanish]…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

      Medical Translation Insight

  • Goodbye EN 15038, hello ISO 17000

    ForeignExchange Translations
    28 Oct 2014 | 7:07 am
    Medical translation companies' quality systems are typically certified to ISO 9001 (or other industry specific ISO standards such as 13485, 14971). However, there has been an absence of translation-specific ISO standards. EN 15038 was published in 2006, and has been widely accepted by translation companies, in an effort to fill this gap. Now ISO 17100 is scheduled for release in late 2014 or
  • We're looking for a Senior Technology Strategist

    ForeignExchange Translations
    3 Oct 2014 | 8:49 am
    ForeignExchange is having another amazing growth year. To support our growing organization, new and growing client relationships, new service offerings, and an expanded geographic footprint, we are looking to hire a technology leader.The Senior Technology Strategist identifies, prioritizes and manages the execution of creating solutions using a set of application platforms supported by the
  • Primer: Linguistic validation

    ForeignExchange Translations
    5 Aug 2014 | 9:52 am
    Increasingly, large-scale clinical trial programs are conducted in non-English countries, and the need to translate and adapt clinical trial documentation for use in other than the source language continues to rise in demand. A key methodology for the evaluation of therapies is the randomized controlled trial. These clinical trials traditionally relied on relatively objective clinical outcome
  • 5 great resources for medical translation research

    ForeignExchange Translations
    31 Jul 2014 | 9:55 am
    Researching medical terminology is a big and important part of every medical translator's professional life. There are hundreds of resources for medical translators online - for different language pairs and different areas of specialization. Karen Sexton compiled five especially useful tools on her blog. Here is how she selected them:Medilexicon: This dictionary also features in my dictionaries
  • 25th Life Sciences roundtable at Localization World

    ForeignExchange Translations
    5 Jun 2014 | 11:51 am
    The 25th edition of Localization World kicked off in Dublin on Tuesday with the Life Science roundtable. With 24 attendees, this was one of the largest roundtables to-date. A number of topics were discussed ranging from the new trends towards content "digitalization" and what it means to medical translation suppliers. As in the past, there were a number of sessions on technology. The panel on
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    JLPT Boot Camp - The Ultimate Study Guide to passing the Japanese Language Proficiency Test

  • JLPT N5 Grammar: Talking about Wants and Making Suggestions and Invitations

    Clayton MacKnight
    23 Oct 2014 | 7:13 am
    This month, we go over how to talk about wanting to do something, and wanting a particular object.  We will also deal with making suggestions and inviting someone politely to do something.  I go over all that and more in the video below: For over 6 hours of videos like this one, be sure to subscribe to the JLPT N5 Grammar YouTube Channel Or check out some of the other N5 grammar videos: Japanese adjectives Japanese adjectives – past tense Japanese adjectives – polite past tense Japanese particle wa Japanese particle ga Japanese present tense verbs Japanese past tense verbs Kore…
  • JLPT BC 146 | Travel to Matsuyama with Me

    Clayton MacKnight
    15 Oct 2014 | 6:31 pm
    Phew, that was a bit of a long train ride. It seems like Matsuyama is such a long way from most of the major cities in Japan. And it really feels like it too. I heard there are around 500,000 people here, but it is a pretty sleepy town. It’s good to get away from the crowds you know? All right, well, that’s Matsuyama castle, but I’m a bit exhausted from the trip, I don’t really feel like hiking up there today. We will visit it tomorrow after we have had some time to relax and get a feel for the city. First things first, let’s take a tram to Dogoonsen station.
  • JLPT Study Guide Month 9

    Clayton MacKnight
    8 Oct 2014 | 6:22 pm
    This is a continuing series going over a sample JLPT study guide. If you are just joining the discussion, you might want to check out month 1, month 2, month 3, month 4, month 5, month 6, month 7, and month 8 before continuing. In the past, when I prepared for the JLPT, I always kept simply doing what I was doing until the final day before the test. I didn’t really see a need to change up my study routine that much before the big day. After all, what could you possible change that would make a difference a few months before the big exam? Well, working with and talking to a couple of…
  • FluentU gets Support for Japanese

    Clayton MacKnight
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:48 am
    You’ve probably heard that the best thing for you to do when you learn a language is to try to get your hands on as much native material as possible, and expose yourself to it on a regular if not constant basis.  But this is easier said than done.  Japanese can be especially tricky, because you first have to literally learn to read the language in order to start absorbing printed content.  You can probably pick up hiragana and katakana in an intense week or over a month or two, but kanji, that is completely different. And, because of this limitation it can be often hard to find level…
  • JLPT BC 145 | The Only Constant is Change

    Clayton MacKnight
    24 Sep 2014 | 7:19 am
    I used to be a huge Garfield fan growing up. I read all his comics and thought that they were the best. For my 8th birthday, my parents even made me a Garfield shaped cake and decorated it perfectly. I had a stuffed Garfield toy that I dragged with everywhere I went. It was my friend and companion on many adventures. But eventually I grew out of that stage. I stopped taking Garfield on car trips. And he ended up getting thrown under a pile of stuff in a closet somewhere. I grew up and moved on. Old study habits are kind of like those trusty stuffed animals you had. They were great. They were…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Macmillan

  • Language tip of the week: school

    Liz Potter
    30 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in usage in American and British English of the word school: In both the UK and the US, school usually means a place where children are taught from the age of four or five until they are 18. American speakers also use school to refer to a university. In the UK, you say that children are at…
  • New pragmatics lesson plan: ways of warning people

    Liz Potter
    28 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Have you seen our latest lesson plan by author Jonathan Marks? This new resource is part of the ‘expressing yourself’ series and helps learners review and consolidate ways of warning people. What’s included? Worksheets for students, tips for teachers, as well as an answer key and suggested follow-up activities. All pragmatics lesson plans – including this one – are available for free from the Macmillan Dictionary. For more information about the series, take a look at Michael Rundell’s introduction to the pragmatics series and the related blog post Life Skills language…
  • Mildew all around me, and other mondegreens

    Stan Carey
    27 Oct 2014 | 3:00 am
    Misheard song lyrics have been in my head again. Kerry Maxwell’s BuzzWord article on creep as a combining form reminded me of the memorably rude example ‘I drove all night, crapped in your room’ – instead of crept. Then a Twitter friend mentioned ‘Poppadum Creek’, a surreal misanalysis of Madonna’s lyric ‘Papa Don’t Preach’, and it got the ball rolling. The word for this is mondegreen. As Stephen Bullon notes, it was coined in 1954 by Sylvia Wright, who heard an old ballad that went ‘They have slain the Earl o’ Moray / And laid him on the green’ and thought the…
  • Language and words in the news – 24th October, 2014

    Liz Potter
    24 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link for us to include, or just add a comment to the post, with the link(s) you’d like to share. Language change and slang The linguistics of LOL LOLspeak was meant to sound like the twisted language inside a cat’s brain, and has ended up resembling a down-South…
  • Language tip of the week: conversation

    Liz Potter
    23 Oct 2014 | 6:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. In this new series of  language tips we will be looking at how metaphor is used to express some common concepts in English. This week’s tip looks at metaphors used to talk about conversation: A conversation or discussion is like a journey,  with the speakers going from one place to another: Let’s go back to what you were saying earlier. Can we return to the previous point? I can’t quite see where you’re heading. The conversation took an unexpected…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    The Mezzofanti Guild

  • Guest Post: How to get started on learning Russian

    Donovan Nagel
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:14 am
    This guest post is from Natalie who runs a blog called Fluent Historian. Natalie’s one of the most passionate bloggers I follow – she writes quite prolifically about Russian and Eastern European politics and literature, and is super well-informed about that part of the world. Today she’s sharing a bit about her experience learning Russian which you might find interesting and helpful. Whenever I tell people I speak fluent Russian, I usually get a lot of puzzled looks. “Is your family Russian?” is the usual polite question I get. (My family is from all over, but…
  • It’s Time To De-Bullshitize What Language Immersion Means

    Donovan Nagel
    15 Oct 2014 | 6:56 am
    Okay… so ‘de-bullshitize’ isn’t really a word. I thought about using ‘clarify’ but it doesn’t have the same effect. I’ve talked quite a bit about how the words fluency and advanced are the most misunderstood and misused words by language learners and blogging “experts”. Well immersion is another one. Funnily enough, these words remind me of words like fascism in the media; they get thrown around so much these days that nobody has any idea what they mean anymore. “Just immerse yourself in the language.” “I’ve been…
  • Update From Nubia + Early Access To The Epic Arabic Language Project

    Donovan Nagel
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:43 am
    G’day! How’s your language learning going? I’ve finally arrived back in Cairo after an amazing journey down to Nubia in the far south of Egypt along the border of Sudan (hence the lack of updates the last few weeks!). I had originally hoped to go into Sudan as well but I’ve decided to postpone that for a later trip. Although I’ve stayed in Egypt several times over the last 12 years, this was actually the first chance I’ve had to venture down this close to the Sudanese border and I’m sure it won’t be the last. The hospitality and friendliness of…
  • 7 Questions You Have To Ask Before Buying A Language Product (#3 Is Vital)

    Donovan Nagel
    25 Sep 2014 | 6:08 am
    The challenge that most of us often face when buying books or resources to learn a foreign language is not that there isn’t enough available. The problem is that there’s so much out there that it can be tough to decide what’s good and what isn’t. And a lot of it is frankly rubbish. There’s actually very little innovation too when it comes to language learning products. Most of it’s a reinvention of the wheel so to speak; the same content or same approach packaged up and presented a little differently. This is why I’m always happy to endorse products…
  • How Arabic Words Made It Into The Chinese Language

    Donovan Nagel
    19 Sep 2014 | 12:21 am
    Today’s guest post comes from accomplished polyglot Judith Meyer. She runs a blog called LearnLangs and was also the organizer for the Polyglot Conference in Berlin this year. As I mentioned recently on Facebook, Judith’s running a fundraising campaign at the moment to get help putting together a really impressive tool for learning Mandarin Chinese called LearnYu (if you ever wanted a Duolingo-esque tool for Mandarin then this might be what you’re after). The campaign still has just under 2 weeks left and I’m sure she’d really appreciate your support. Click here…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    EVS Translations Blog

  • Halloween – The Coolest Holiday Ever

    evs2
    29 Oct 2014 | 11:45 pm
    It's that time of the year again - it's October and the time of the coolest holiday ever - Halloween! The only festive season cherished equally by children and adults. Think about it - you would expect people to say Christmas - yeah, sure everything is about love and light but those who really enjoy […] The post Halloween – The Coolest Holiday Ever appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Translation services for the construction and architecture industry Shitstorm – word of the year in Germany E-learning internationalisation and localisation
  • Trending – Word of the day

    evs2
    29 Oct 2014 | 11:15 pm
    What is trending today? Trending words and styles promoted by trending celebrities, along with figures about what is in and hashtags on social media are impacting some of our lives, leading us towards perfect conformity with trends. What would life be like without knowing which band is trendy to listen to or which superstar to […] The post Trending – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Paparazzi – Word of the day Squatter – Word of the day Summit – Word of the day
  • Obelisk – Word of the day

    evs2
    28 Oct 2014 | 9:56 pm
    The obelisk was a key element of Egyptian architecture – made out of stone “which may be called long broaches or spires” as was described in the first English use in 1546. Although the obelisk is Egyptian, originally the word comes from Greek as a result of the writings of Herodotus who described the obelisk. […] The post Obelisk – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Leotard – Word of the day Nirvana – Word of the day Measles – Word of the day
  • Navigating the Choppy Sea of Pharmaceutical Innovation

    evs2
    28 Oct 2014 | 2:21 am
    For most businesses product development and market introduction reads something like this: a product is created, marketed, and then sold. For pharmaceutical companies, the process is substantially longer and more complex, especially when dealing with quasi-multinational entities like the European Union. The case of  leading pharmaceutical companies and their quest to find not only a […] The post Navigating the Choppy Sea of Pharmaceutical Innovation appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Translation and authoring of chemical Safety Data Sheets in accordance with REACH,…
  • Harem – Word of the day

    evs2
    28 Oct 2014 | 12:48 am
    The word harem comes from the Arabic and refers to something forbidden or kept safe. The word originally referred to the part of a Muslim house built to ensure privacy of Muslim women. Entry was forbidden to men who were not members of the family. The first person to refer to the harem in English […] The post Harem – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Gung-ho – Word of the day Ginseng – Word of the day Geyser – Word of the day
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Speaking Latino

  • ¿Dónde está mi cutara?: Cultural Spanish Song to Learn Animal Names from Cuba

    Diana Caballero
    22 Oct 2014 | 5:53 pm
    Spanish class activities around the traditional cultural Spanish song ¿Dónde está mi cutara? Students will learn popular Spanish names of animals from Cuba. Read More >The post ¿Dónde está mi cutara?: Cultural Spanish Song to Learn Animal Names from Cuba appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • Spanish Class Activities With Christmas Songs in Spanish

    Diana Caballero
    22 Oct 2014 | 6:15 am
    Spanish class activities with Christmas songs in Spanish: Silent Night, White Christmas, Little Drummer Boy, Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer, The Twelve Days of Christmas and Jingle Bells. Read More >The post Spanish Class Activities With Christmas Songs in Spanish appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • El tamborilero and Noche de paz: Spanish Song Activities to Practice Nativity Scene Vocabulary

    Diana Caballero
    22 Oct 2014 | 3:19 am
    Spanish song activities to practice Nativity Scene vocabulary with Little Drummer Boy and Silent Night in Spanish (El tamborilero and Noche de paz). Includes a printable bingo game. Read More >The post El tamborilero and Noche de paz: Spanish Song Activities to Practice Nativity Scene Vocabulary appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • Blanca Navidad: Spanish Song Activities to Practice Winter Vocabulary

    Diana Caballero
    21 Oct 2014 | 6:10 am
    Spanish song activities to practice Winter vocabulary with the Christmas song in Spanish, White Christmas (Blanca Navidad). Read More >The post Blanca Navidad: Spanish Song Activities to Practice Winter Vocabulary appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • Cascabel: Spanish Song Activities to Practice the Present, Preterite and Family Vocabulary

    Diana Caballero
    21 Oct 2014 | 4:51 am
    Spanish class activities to practice the present, preterite and basic family vocabulary with Jingle Bells (Cascabel), the Christmas song in Spanish. Read More >The post Cascabel: Spanish Song Activities to Practice the Present, Preterite and Family Vocabulary appeared first on Speaking Latino.
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Blog at Fluent Language Tuition

  • Three Language Learning Affirmations You Should Use (And Why They Will Work!)

    Kerstin Hammes
    27 Oct 2014 | 6:47 am
    Let me tell you about a demon. It keeps you safe and small, makes sure you’re in your place. It stops you from leaning out too far, leaning in to new adventures, and saying yes to any kind of change or risk. It’s kind of like a helicopter parent, and lives right in your head. That demon is called self-doubt.Scenario 1: Self-DoubtIf you’ve been on a roll, spending the last few weeks listening to target language podcasts and seeing your tutor on a regular basis, then you’re expecting progress. You’re expecting a measurable, tangible feeling that this is worth the effort. And when that…
  • Detailed Review of Rosetta Stone Tell Me More (aka Rosetta Stone Advanced)

    Kerstin Hammes
    23 Oct 2014 | 2:18 am
    Full Review and Screenshots of Rosetta Stone Tell Me More/Advanced Here's the thing. My French is not as good as it used to be. Last week, I met the very interesting Zahid Hussain, a local author and entrepreneur. Turns out Zahid speaks not only German, Urdu and English. He also went to school in France and his French is outstanding! Since I hadn't spoken French for over a year, I was excited to practice and started a conversation with him. And within a few minutes, I was pretty embarrassed. Zahid took no nonsense, and I forgot quite a few words. No excuse! Time to get back to studying! My…
  • Four Big Lessons from the Language Show in London

    Kerstin Hammes
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:49 am
    "Beautiful Russian woman" The Language Show is the UK's biggest and only language-focused trade show, held in London and attracting thousands of language lovers. So far I've been resisting the call of Europe's great Polyglot Conferences so far (more about those later) but for this one I made my way down to big London to see the latest trends, technologies and products out there in language learning. The Language Show is free to attend, runs over three days and features a huge amount of workshops, cultural performances and taster language lessons to try out. It's held at the London Olympia, an…
  • How Flashcards Helped Me Get Back To Language Learning

    Angel Armstead
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:29 am
    You guys might remember a recent post from Angel Armstead, our resident Japanese language and video game buff! Today, Angel is sharing a bit more about how she uses flashcards to get back into the action. Something as simple as flashcards have helped me get back on my way into language learning. I still have a very busy schedule. I'm working on creating my own coffee business. I want to complete a novel and I've decided to create my own video game. That doesn't even add in the miscellaneous stuff I do such as piano practice or other emergencies that steal time from me. I use these Kanji…
  • New Podcast: Episode 8 -- Lindsay and Kerstin Do Languages

    Kerstin Hammes
    14 Oct 2014 | 5:04 am
    In Episode 8, my guest is Lindsay Dow, a really enthusiastic and cool independent language teacher from the UK. Lindsay is well-known for her great Youtube videos about all aspects of language learning, and she was also a winner in the Sensational Fluent Giveaway. “No one learns a language because they want their life to stay the same.” The show doesn't follow the usual interview format, instead Lindsay came on as a co-host and talked about her favourite blogs and articles, as well as her own story of language learning. She also helped me select the Tip of the Week.Some of the highlights:…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Spanish Obsessed

  • Intermediate 21: Una Colombiana en España

    Rob
    28 Oct 2014 | 1:56 pm
    We talk about the next part of our holidays, where we travel to Barcelona. Transcription for this podcast coming soon! The post Intermediate 21: Una Colombiana en España appeared first on Spanish Obsessed.
  • Intermediate 20: Viaje a Francia

    Rob
    28 Oct 2014 | 1:54 pm
    We took some holidays recently (again – we do work sometimes, honest!), starting with a wedding in Toulouse, France. Here, we talk about our experience in a French (and Colombian) wedding. Transcription for this podcast coming soon! The post Intermediate 20: Viaje a Francia appeared first on Spanish Obsessed.
  • Intermediate 19: Cultural etiquette

    Rob
    3 Aug 2014 | 9:12 am
    We talk about a few of the cultural norms in both England and South America, and how different they can be! Transcription for this podcast coming soon! The post Intermediate 19: Cultural etiquette appeared first on Spanish Obsessed.
  • Intermediate 18: 5 surprising things about Colombia

    Rob
    3 Aug 2014 | 9:02 am
    Rob tells Liz about 5 surprising things he learnt when he was in Colombia. Transcription for this podcast coming soon! The post Intermediate 18: 5 surprising things about Colombia appeared first on Spanish Obsessed.
  • Advanced 18: Spanish in the USA

    Rob
    22 Jun 2014 | 3:53 am
    The majority of visitors to Spanish Obsessed come from the USA. We talk about the rise of Spanish in the States! However, we don’t have any first hand experience of this, so we would love to our American visitors’ (or anyone else with experience in this!) opinions on the rise of Spanish in the land of opportunity! Transcription ▼  Speaker Transcription Rob Rob: Hola Liz. ¿Qué más? Liz Hola Rob. ¿Cómo estás? Rob Perfecto – muy bien. ¿Y tú? ¿Qué más? Liz Muy bien. Aunque estoy un poco enferma los últimos días — alérgia a polen. Pero siempre con la buena…
 
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Learn Spanish My Way

  • Ways to Say "I Love You"

    Keith Walters
    24 Oct 2014 | 10:30 am
    This is a response to a recent request I received wanting to know how to say "I love you" in Spanish. In English, we only have the one way to say "I love you" and that's it. Now with Spanish being a romance language, you better believe there is more than one way to express it.Te quiero.Te amo.Both of the above sentences reflect "I love you" in Spanish. There are differences as to which one you would use. It often depends on which region or country you are saying it and to whom you are saying it.Typically, the most common way is te quiero. You would use it with family, friends, lovers, and…
  • Baby Steps

    Keith Walters
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:11 pm
    When you first set out to learn Spanish, or any foreign language for that matter, it is important to take baby steps. After all, learning something well will take some time to do.I like the analogy of babies taking their first steps. It is much like many things we learn for the first time. We won't do it right when we start, but in time, it gets a little easier and a little better. Learning Spanish is no different!Many often ask me what are the first things to do in order to learn this language. The answer lies with you. What is your ultimate goal with the language? Why do you want to learn…
  • Help Me Help You

    Keith Walters
    3 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    ¡Hola!From time to time, I like to get your input as to what you would like to see in my blog pertaining to Spanish. What issues are you facing? What challenges you with the language?My desire is to bring you the best content when it comes to Spanish. I like to break down a common problem or issue or delve deep into a particular topic or grammar point. Sometimes, I showcase some interesting resources or knowledge about a thing, custom or place.I need your help! It's your turn to help me help you. Take a few minutes to respond to this super quick survey below. I promise to take your feedback…
  • Where Is the Help?

    Keith Walters
    15 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    The very last thing to discuss about when to use the subjunctive in Spanish is the indefinite and non-existent. When you use a sentence describing something or someone out there who may or may not exist, you would use the subjunctive. When you are speaking about something that may or may not happen or the end time frame is "up in the air," you would use the subjunctive. These are all unknown factors and because they are undetermined, you must use the subjunctive.Here are some examples:Necesitamos un horno que funcione consistentemente.We need an oven that works consistently.Quiero que mi…
  • Expressing the Impersonal

    Keith Walters
    1 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    Expressing impersonal desires or judgments in Spanish will always use the subjunctive "mood." But what are these impersonal expressions or statements?Well, these are statements that must have a specific subject. They will still have two verbs and two subjects. Instead of two specific subjects, only the second verb will have a clear subject. The first subject is general and very generic in nature. It takes the form of "it." The expressions follow this construction:It is + [an adjective] + that + [second subject] + [the desire or judgement].Es + [un adjectivo] + que + [subjecto…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Smoke & Croak

  • Registering a Glocal ccTLD – the Benefits & Challenges

    Liam Curley
    10 Oct 2014 | 7:06 am
    Website structure is a fundamental element of international SEO and online marketing. By structure, I’m talking about the top level domain used by your website (example.com, example.co.uk, example.de, etc.). I want to use this post to address some of the benefits, challenges and misconceptions that surround the registration and regulations. What is a ccTLD? A ccTLD is a country coded top level domain that corresponds to a country, territory or geographic location. So, for the UK we have .UK, in Germany it’s .DE. Why use a ccTLD? The main reason for using a ccTLD is if you’re targeting a…
  • Cultural Consideration in Landing Page Design

    Liam Curley
    4 Sep 2014 | 3:59 am
    The term ‘website localisation’ is often used interchangeably with ‘website translation’. However, whilst translating an existing piece of content from one language to another allows you to communicate with a new audience, you can’t expect that same web page to draw an identical response from two users with different cultural backgrounds. No two cultures are the same, and our personal experiences and biases influence the way that we receive any brand or content. An identical web page for an ecommerce site will not deliver identical conversion rates from users in Brazil and France if…
  • Offering Free Delivery to International Customers

    Liam Curley
    4 Aug 2014 | 6:39 am
    A great deal has been written regarding the expectations that e-consumers have regarding delivery charges. Free delivery options have been rolled out on mass by large online retailers and small retailers have followed suit in order to remain competitive. Research conducted (with US respondents) by ComScore in December 2011 showed that 36% of consumers wouldn’t consider purchasing an item if they were required to pay delivery and a further 42% actively seek out retailers offering free delivery. Further research found that after product price, shipping charges were the most important element…
  • Q&A – Managing Currencies in International E-commerce

    Liam Curley
    8 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    I recently caught up with Neil Seymour, managing director of Challenge Trophies (@SportsTrophies). During the past four years, Challenge Trophies have been expanding their e-commerce business into Europe and Neil agreed to offer some valuable insight into the challenges of managing multiple currencies on an e-commerce website. 1. Tell us a bit about you and Challenge Trophies Challenge Trophies was founded in 1976, a family business originally set up as a retail outlet selling trophies, medals and awards to the local community. As Challenge Trophies evolved, we worked with increasing numbers…
  • 3 Minute Read – Translating your Slogan?

    Liam Curley
    16 Jun 2014 | 2:06 am
    3 Key points addressed: When should you translate your tagline When you can avoid translation How to manage a slogan translation Why do you have a Tagline? The title refers to slogans, but I prefer the term tagline. We’re talking about the line of text below your logo, on your literature and website. Before deciding on whether to translate the tagline for new markets, ask yourself why you have the tagline. What purpose does it serve? There are two types of tagline: The Abstract – this represents and conveys the brand values through a memorable and simple message. Take McDonalds’; I’m…
  • add this feed to my.Alltop

    Inbox Translation

  • 7 Good Reasons for Translating Menus in Hotel Restaurants

    Alina Cincan
    24 Oct 2014 | 4:11 am
    With globalisation, higher standard of living across the world, low-cost air fares, highly competitive hotel prices and tourist agencies that are prepared to organise all aspects of travelling abroad, people nowadays travel more often and further away from their home than ever before. This also means that the possibility of travellers understanding the language of […] The post 7 Good Reasons for Translating Menus in Hotel Restaurants appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • Happy International Translation Day!

    Alina Cincan
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:44 am
    I cannot believe it’s been more than a month since my last post, but August and September have been two very busy months, so I hope I can be forgiven. However, I could not have let this day pass without a special post dedicated to the International Translation Day. There are so many things that […] The post Happy International Translation Day! appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • 3000+ Translation Glossaries – From Abbreviations to Zoology and Everything in Between

    Alina Cincan
    6 Aug 2014 | 2:44 am
    Glossaries are an invaluable tool for translators (and not only). Finding good glossaries is not always an easy task – it can be time-consuming and sometimes frustrating. I’m sure all of you have saved or bookmarked your favourite glossaries  as you discovered them (I know I always do!), but I’m also sure you wouldn’t mind […] The post 3000+ Translation Glossaries – From Abbreviations to Zoology and Everything in Between appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • How to Deal with Rejection as a Freelancer

    Alina Cincan
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:25 am
    As exciting as it may sound, freelancing (whatever the field) is not always the idyllic career that people believe it to be – it can be stressful and unpredictable, but it can also bring a lot of satisfactions. It is the former aspect I’m going to tackle today. Anybody who has promised you a glamorous […] The post How to Deal with Rejection as a Freelancer appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • Mind Your Language? No! Mind Other People’s Language: How Not to Behave When Living in a Foreign Country

    Alina Cincan
    20 Jun 2014 | 12:19 am
    Fasten your seatbelt, you’re going abroad! But hold on, they speak a FOREIGN language! What to do!? Well, let me tell you what NOT to. The following are some lessons on how not to behave in a foreign country. For this post, I asked some of my friends (who moved to foreign countries without having […] The post Mind Your Language? No! Mind Other People’s Language: How Not to Behave When Living in a Foreign Country appeared first on Inbox Translation.
 
Log in