Linguistics

  • Most Topular Stories

  • 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature

    Brave New Words
    9 Oct 2014 | 10:35 am
    This year’s Nobel Prize in Literature has been awarded to Patrick Modiano.Is this what you expected? What do you think? I must admit he wasn't on my radar!
  • How Flashcards Helped Me Get Back To Language Learning

    Blog at Fluent Language Tuition
    Angel Armstead
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:29 am
    You guys might remember a recent post from Angel Armstead, our resident Japanese language and video game buff! Today, Angel is sharing a bit more about how she uses flashcards to get back into the action. Something as simple as flashcards have helped me get back on my way into language learning. I still have a very busy schedule. I'm working on creating my own coffee business. I want to complete a novel and I've decided to create my own video game. That doesn't even add in the miscellaneous stuff I do such as piano practice or other emergencies that steal time from me. I use these Kanji…
  • Dive Into The Deep End

    The Everyday Language Learner
    aarongmyers
    23 Sep 2014 | 10:40 am
    I recently received an email from a friend who was describing his feelings for his language learning journey in terms of a language swimming pool. When you take that initial step into the pool you are met with the shock of cold water.  Slowly, one step at a time, you move forward and the water inches its way up your body, past your waist and up your torso until only your head is above water. This in many ways reflects my own journey to learn Turkish and Spanish.  With those first steps, progress is quite tangible.  Like watching – and feeling – the cold water move up your body,…
  • Climbing the grammar tree

    English, Jack
    19 Sep 2014 | 12:04 am
    I've started a new blog called "Climbing the grammar tree". The idea is that I will respond to readings I'm doing for my doctoral studies, so check it out.
  • Children understand familiar voices better than those of strangers

    Language Acquisition News -- ScienceDaily
    6 Oct 2014 | 10:29 am
    Familiar voices can improve spoken language processing among school-age children, according to a study. However, the advantage of hearing a familiar voice only helps children to process and understand words they already know well, not new words that aren’t in their vocabularies.
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    Language Acquisition News -- ScienceDaily

  • Tool enhances social inclusion for people with autism

    15 Oct 2014 | 5:58 am
    A tool designed to assist people with autism spectrum disorders has been developed. It works by adapting written documents into a format that is easier for them to read and understand, researchers report.
  • Programming computers in everyday language

    13 Oct 2014 | 6:02 am
    Computers speak a language of their own. They can only be programmed by those, who know the code. Computer scientists are now working on software that directly translates natural language into machine-readable source texts. In this way, users may generate own computer applications in a few sentences. The challenge to be managed is that people do not always describe processes in a strictly chronological order. A new analysis tool serves to automatically order the commands in the way they are to be executed by the computer. 
  • Children understand familiar voices better than those of strangers

    6 Oct 2014 | 10:29 am
    Familiar voices can improve spoken language processing among school-age children, according to a study. However, the advantage of hearing a familiar voice only helps children to process and understand words they already know well, not new words that aren’t in their vocabularies.
  • Kids' oral language skills can predict future writing difficulties

    6 Oct 2014 | 5:46 am
    Children's future writing difficulties can be identified before they even learn how to begin writing, according to a new study. The research data also contradicts the popular belief that bilingualism at an early age can be detrimental to oral and written language learning.
  • Software for Google glass that provides captions for hard-of-hearing users

    2 Oct 2014 | 1:26 pm
    Speech-to-text software for Google Glass has been created that helps hard-of-hearing users with everyday conversations. A hard-of-hearing person wears Glass while a second person speaks directly into a smartphone. The speech is converted to text, sent to Glass and displayed on its heads-up display.
 
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    English Experts

  • Como dizer Em Pé, Sentado e Deitado em inglês

    Donay Mendonça
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Às vezes, algo que parece simples em inglês pode acabar se tornando um bicho de sete cabeças em determinados contextos. Este é o caso das ideias relacionadas a “em pé”, “sentado” e “deitado”. Os verbos stand up, sit down e lie down são facilmente assimilados no sentido de “levantar-se”, “sentar-se” e “deitar-se”. Porém, na hora de dizer, por exemplo, “eu fico em pé a viagem inteira”, “eu fico sentado o dia inteiro no trabalho” ou “ele está deitado no sofá”, a coisa muda de figura e surgem muitos…
  • #127 Boletim: Semana do saco cheio e outras expressões em inglês

    Alessandro Brandão
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Howdy English Experts readers! Depois de algumas semanas atribuladas, estamos de volta com o boletim. Selecionei para hoje algumas expressões interessantes, uma delas eu passei a ouvir principalmente de amigos que têm filhos em idade escolar. Você sabe como dizer “semana do saco cheio” em inglês? Confesso que eu não conhecia essa expressão, nem mesmo em português. Mas é como diz o ditado “live and learn”. Agora vamos aos melhores tópicos das últimas semanas. Como dizer “semana do saco cheio” em inglês Prepare to x Prepare for: Qual utilizar Como dizer…
  • Expressões dos Seriados: Put something to bed

    Alessandro Brandão
    14 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Hi everyone! A expressão de hoje é “Put something to bed”. Ela significa “acabar de fazer ou escrever algo (e mandar para a gráfica); colocar um fim em algo”. Confira abaixo os exemplos com áudio. This month’s issue is ready. Let’s put it to bed. [ A edição deste mês está pronta. Manda para a gráfica. ] Everything’s set now. Let’s put this whole thing to bed once and for all. [ Tudo está certo agora. Vamos colocar um fim nisso de uma vez por todas. ] Ouça o áudio: http://www.englishexperts.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Put-something-to-bed.mp3…
  • No dentista: vocabulário e expressões relacionadas em inglês

    Donay Mendonça
    13 Oct 2014 | 4:00 am
    Não é nenhuma novidade (it’s not news to anyone) que ir ao dentista (going to the dentist ou going to the dentist’s) é uma coisa que muitas pessoas não gostam de fazer. Algumas dizem sentir um certo medo (feel a little afraid) só de lembrar do barulho (noise) que aquele “aparelhinho” conhecido como broca (drill) faz. Em se tratando de crianças, então, às vezes, é uma batalha (it’s tough) convencê-las a irem. Bom, a essa altura (by now), eu acredito que você já deve (must) ter se lembrado (remembered) de alguma situação (situation) parecida que tenha…
  • Expressões dos Seriados: Put it on the line

    Alessandro Brandão
    7 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Hi everyone! A expressão de hoje é “Put it on the line”. Ela significa “arriscar (fazer algo), colocar algo em jogo”. Confira abaixo os exemplos com áudio. You put your reputation on the line when you started helping her. [ Você arriscou sua reputação quando começou a ajudá-la. ] Firefighters put their lives on the line every single day. [ Os bombeiros arriscam suas vidas todo santo dia. ] Ouça o áudio: http://www.englishexperts.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/Put-it-on-the-line.mp3 Baixe o mp3 I hope you like it! Referência Ebook Gírias &…
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    The English Blog

  • Cartoon: Welsh NHS Crisis

    Jeffrey Hill
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:53 pm
    BACKGROUND Patients are so desperate to flee the crisis-hit Welsh NHS they are going private or moving to England, it emerged last night. Tens of thousands cross the border every year to escape lengthy waiting lists or access life-saving drugs. Nearly four times as many Welsh patients are treated in England as the other way round, official figures show. Read more >> THE CARTOONThe cartoon by Mac from the Daily Mail shows the scene in a Welsh hospital. The doctor has just taken the bandages off the head of a patient who is totally covered in bandages, but there is nobody inside. He tells…
  • Newsy Video: Apple's Earnings Surpass Expectations

    Jeffrey Hill
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:29 pm
    It’s been a season of change for Apple — a whole new device in the Apple Watch, a shot at credit cards with Apple Pay — oh, and of course those new, bigger iPhones. But now we know exactly how the harvest turned out. Apple announced it’s better than expected fourth-quarter earnings results at the end of trading Monday — with reported sales of some $42.1 billion. That’s an increase of 12% over last year, and an increase from $1.18 to $1.42 per share. Full transcript >> Related articlesApple earnings rise 13% as results top forecastsApple reports fourth quarter results…
  • Words in the News: Exodus

    Jeffrey Hill
    20 Oct 2014 | 10:25 pm
    Patients are so desperate to flee the crisis-hit Welsh NHS they are going private or moving to England, it emerged last night. Tens of thousands cross the border every year to escape lengthy waiting lists or access life- saving drugs. Nearly four times as many Welsh patients are treated in England as the other way round, official figures show. Full story >> VOCABULARYAn exodus is a situation in which a lot of people leave a place or activity at the same time. • The stock market has seen a recent exodus of investors from high-technology stocks. A mass exodus is an occasion when…
  • Cartoons on the Ebola Outbreak

    Jeffrey Hill
    20 Oct 2014 | 7:15 am
    U.S. News has an excellent collection of 29 cartoons on the Ebola outbreak. This cartoon by David Horsey from the Los Angeles Times is one of my favourites (if you can have a favourite cartoon about something like Ebola). COMMENTARYThe man thinks he has the symptoms of Ebola, but his wife tells him that he's eaten too much pizza and watched too much cable news. The cartoonist is implying that cable news channels such as Fox, CNN, and MSNBC have been creating hysteria with their sensationalized Ebola coverage. VOCABULARY1. The jalapeño is a medium-sized chili pepper.2. Combo is an…
  • Newsy Video: More Companies Relax Dress Codes, Ditch The Suits And Ties

    Jeffrey Hill
    19 Oct 2014 | 10:40 pm
    So long suit and ties, casual Fridays might be here to stay. A shift in dress codes across several major companies suggest that day might be here sooner than we think. Starbucks is just the latest company to relax style rules for its baristas, allowing them to show some tattoos and piercings, and even wear jeans and untucked shirts. Full transcript >> Related articlesTattoos, nose studs OK for Starbucks baristasStarbucks says baristas can have tattoosStarbucks baristas getting raises and a snack - CNNMoney
 
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    Language Log

  • Rule of / by law

    Victor Mair
    20 Oct 2014 | 8:02 pm
    Because it has been very much in the news in recent days, the question of how to translate the Chinese term fǎzhì 法治 (lit., "law-rule / govern") has come up.  Should it be "rule of law" or "rule by law"? First of all, let's look at the numbers: 1. "rule of law"  6,080,000 ghits Quick definition from Google:  "the restriction of the arbitrary exercise of power by subordinating it to well-defined and established laws." 2. "rule by law"   2,070,000 ghits No quick definition available; I couldn't even find "rule by law" in the usual legal dictionaries that I consult. If someone asked…
  • Embarrassing amnesia

    Victor Mair
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:17 pm
    [This is a guest post by David Moser] Part I I was giving a talk the other day, in Chinese, to Chinese students, about English pedagogy (go figure).  I wanted to mention something about the difficulty of remembering how to write Chinese characters, and I chose to use an example of the idiom 韬光养晦 tao1guang1yang3hui4, "to hide your light under a bushel."  Now the interesting thing about this example is that I had used it several times before as an example, in talks about the difficulty of Hanzi, and I said to the audience something like: Now here is an idiom that I encounter probably…
  • Etymology in the rain forest

    Mark Liberman
    20 Oct 2014 | 2:00 pm
    "Scientist discovers puppy-sized spider in rain forest", ABC 11 Eyewitness News 10/20/2014: For all readers with arachnophobia, take a moment to collect yourself before proceeding further, because this spider will haunt your dreams. Harvard Etymologist Piotr Naskrecki recently posted on his blog about an encounter in Guyana's rainforest with a South American Goliath birdeater, a spider so large it's the size of a small dog or puppy. According to Naskreski, "Their leg span approaches 30 cm (nearly a foot) and they weigh up to 170 g." More of the spider's endearing characteristics: As Naskrecki…
  • Ebola fear stalks Bloomberg headlines

    Ben Zimmer
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:40 am
    Bloomberg News is notorious for its bizarre, impenetrable headlines. There's a whole Tumblr blog devoted to strange Bloomberg headlines, and Quartz last year ran an article looking into "how Bloomberg headlines got to be so odd." Here's a new one, spotted by David Craig and Brett Wilson: Mark Liberman noted another Bloomberg specimen last January: "Madonna addicted to sweat dance plugs Toronto condos: Mortgages." While that one fits the profile of a crash blossom fairly well, this one is cryptic on other grounds. As David Craig noted on Facebook, it doesn't "have some sort of meaning that…
  • "German type sexual harassment"

    Victor Mair
    20 Oct 2014 | 5:11 am
    From the German "Fun Pics und lustige Videos" website isnichwahr.de comes this hilarious photograph of a dish served at the Quansheng Hotel 泉昇大酒店 (I think that it is in Changsha, Hunan): The Chinese says Dé shì xiánzhūshǒu 德式咸猪手 (German style "salted pig's knuckle / trotter"; cf. Schweinshaxe; Stelze in Austria). Xiánzhūshǒu 咸猪手 also has the derived meaning "groper", which is also often rendered as "sexual harassment". I have explained all of this at great length and with considerable detail in "Grilled sexual harassment"(5/5/13).
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    GoodWord from alphaDictionary.com

  • 10/21/14 - crank

    20 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. A tool consisting of a handle at right angles to a shaft (rather like the letter Z) that creates a rotary motion when turned. 2. A crook or twist, as a crank of phrase; 3. An eccentric or grouchy person.
  • 10/20/14 - fish

    19 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. To try to catch fish. 2. To ask questions blindly in hopes that an answer to the questions will provide information that you want. 3. (Usually misspelled 'phish') To attempt to fraudulently acquire sensitive information, such as passwords and credit card details, by pretending to represent a familiar (financial) institution.
  • 10/19/14 - surge

    18 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. To billow powerfully, to rise and fall in heavy waves. 2. To move forward in a powerful wave. 3. To increase or improve suddenly and to a great extent.
  • 10/18/14 - tuffet

    17 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. A tuft. 2. A mound, hillock, or bump. 3. A hassock, ottoman, low footstool.
  • 10/17/14 - scathe

    16 Oct 2014 | 10:00 pm
    1. To harm or injure. 2. To excoriate, to rake over the coals, to chew out, to furiously criticize.
 
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    Fritinancy

  • Word of the Week: Quarantine

    Nancy Friedman
    20 Oct 2014 | 6:19 am
    Quarantine: A period of enforced isolation or restriction of movement to prevent the spread of infectious disease. From Italian quarantina, a 40-day period. “Quarantine” has spiked recently because of news coverage of the Ebola virus, which originated in West Africa—the virus was named for for what researchers believed to be the Ebola River in what is now the Democratic Republic of the Congo—and has spread to other areas, including the United States. NYTimes.com, October 19, 2014 From the Times story: So it has been in Quarantine Nation. As the Ebola scare spreads from Texas to Ohio…
  • On the Visual Thesaurus: Ish

    Nancy Friedman
    16 Oct 2014 | 10:02 pm
    My latest column for the Visual Thesaurus looks at ish, a flexible little suffix with multiple meanings that’s increasingly seen in titles (ABC-TV’s “Black-ish”), brand names (the Berkeley bookstore Bookish, the Oakland T-shirt company Oaklandish, the vintage-furniture etailer Chairish), and brand descriptors (anonymish). In some places, ish has even attained independent status (Ish Watch; Ish, a children’s book). Full access to the column is restricted to subscribers (only $19.95 a year!). Here’s a shortish excerpt: Bookish: This word has meant “literary” or “enthusiastic…
  • October Linkfest

    Nancy Friedman
    16 Oct 2014 | 6:01 am
    When McDonald’s met Play-Doh, and other examples of peculiar co-branding. (Marketplace) Forward thinking, incremental thinking, and three other proven alternatives to brainstorming. (Strategy+Business) Worst. Infographics. Ever. (WTF Visualizations, via The Guardian, via Paul Wiggins) Bad math, bad spelling, and … chickens? Many more like this at WTF Visualizations. “Years ago, I asked one of my mentors what he thought was the hardest part of designing a typeface. I was expecting ‘the cap S’ or ‘the italic lowercase’ or something like that. But he answered without hesitation:…
  • Word of the Week: Raffish

    Nancy Friedman
    13 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    Raffish: Disreputable, vulgar, sleazy; also (and more commonly now) mischievous, offbeat, showing an attractive disregard for conventional behavior. I’ve been doing some research into brand names that end in -ish, so a recent tweet from word guy James Harbeck caught my attention: The adjectival suffix -ish signifies “having the qualities of [the noun it’s attached to].” So if raffish is “having the qualities of raff,” what is “raff”? It turns out that raff goes back to Middle English. Back in the late 14th century, according to the OED, it meant “a class or group of people…
  • Here a Meow, There a Meow, Everywhere a Meow Meow

    Nancy Friedman
    10 Oct 2014 | 7:16 am
    I’m serious. Everywhere. First sighting: in a story from early September about a BBC radio announcer (oops, presenter) who admitted snorting a drug called mephedrone—street name “meow meow.”Precisely how meow meow got that sobriquet is subject to some debate, but it may derive from the drug’s chemical name, 4-methylmethcathinone, or MM-CAT for short. According to a 2011 Mindhacks postjournalists (and one anonymous Wikipedia editor) were responsible for popularizing the feline nickname. Then I attended a performance at Berkeley Repertory Theatre by the post-post-modern cabaret artist…
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    Language Geek

  • YouTube Polyglot Decline?

    Josh
    2 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    There’s an interesting forum post over at HTLAL, asking, “Were YouTube polyglots a fad?” The poster goes on to say: I wonder now if the YouTube polyglot was a bit of a fad. That in truth there’s only so many different and totally distinct approaches to self-study and once you’ve understood the general process, there’s no urgent need for you to watch masses of videos of people speaking many languages! What do you think? I would agree that it was a sort of fad, and the explanation given above is why. People only need to be told the basic steps of learning…
  • Typisch Deutsch

    Josh
    24 Jun 2014 | 8:04 pm
    I came across a new-to-me offering from Deutsche Welle today: Typisch Deutsch. It’s a video podcast, each one lasting a little over a half hour. People from different vocations are interviewed and discuss their lives in Germany. It’s a nice source of large chunks of dialogue that aren’t scripted / being read (like many of the other podcasts available).
  • Advice for the Assimil Active Wave

    Josh
    9 Apr 2014 | 3:54 pm
    I’ve been working through Assimil’s Russian course, and am now in the midst of both finishing the passive wave and digging into the active wave. Shortly after I started the active wave, I recalled a great post from the HTLAL forums about the active wave, and how to approach it. The post is by user lingoleng, and all credit goes to him; also bear in mind that lingoleng’s native language is German. Ah, if only my German were as good as his English! Here’s his post (original is right here): I can only give some hints, but what you do should really depend on your own…
  • Back on the horse

    Josh
    10 Mar 2014 | 6:35 pm
    Over these past few weeks, I’ve busied myself with Assimil Russian and a fair bit of German reading and writing. With Russian, I’ve been doing a mix of the standard Assimil plan with some of Luca’s ideas mixed in (specifically, writing out translations, going from Russian to English and then back the other way). It’s going well; after many false starts (and stops) with the book over the past few years, I’m now about halfway through it. Provided I keep up the pace, I should be “finished” with it in a little over three months. There were a few…
  • Babel No More

    Josh
    21 Nov 2013 | 5:02 pm
    I recently finished reading Michael Erard’s Babel No More, and found it to be an enjoyable read. Erard ended up not having any definitive answer to his question (what makes the best language learners?), but it still covered all sorts of things that should tickle most language learners. It was also cool to be reading about people that I’ve interacted with on the web, like Ardaschir or Iversen from the HTLAL forums. One thing he talks about at length is fluency, how it’s defined, and, frankly, whether it’s important or not (hint: in most real life scenarios, it’s…
 
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    languagehat.com

  • Khedive.

    languagehat
    20 Oct 2014 | 11:19 am
    I’m continuing to read Abulafia’s The Great Sea (see this post), and I have to share this striking passage (the year is 1867, and Ismail is Isma’il Pasha): Politically, Ismail found he had to steer a careful course. He persuaded the Sublime Porte to grant him a new title and the automatic right of succession through eldest sons, and saw this, with some justice, as recognition that he was now to all intents an independent sovereign. The Turks reluctantly dredged up an old Persian title, ‘khedive’, whose exact meaning was apparent to no one, but which seemed to be…
  • The Prehistory of Prehistory.

    languagehat
    19 Oct 2014 | 8:47 am
    A 2006 paper (pdf) by Peter Rowley-Conwy, “The Concept of Prehistory and the Invention of the Terms ‘Prehistoric’ and ‘Prehistorian’: The Scandinavian Origin, 1833–1850″ (European Journal of Archaeology 9:103–130), not only antedates by twenty years the OED’s first citation for the English word (1871 E. B. Tylor Primitive Culture II. 401 “The history and pre-history of man take their proper places in the general scheme of knowledge,” in an entry updated in March 2007), it provides a fascinating look at how the term and the concept…
  • A Surprising New Sign Language.

    languagehat
    18 Oct 2014 | 5:20 pm
    Julie Sedivy of the University of Calgary (previously cited at LH here) has a post with the hyperbolic, but apparently not actually deceptive, title “The Unusual Language That Linguists Thought Couldn’t Exist”: Languages, like human bodies, come in a variety of shapes—but only to a point. Just as people don’t sprout multiple heads, languages tend to veer away from certain forms that might spring from an imaginative mind. For example, one core property of human languages is known as duality of patterning: meaningful linguistic units (such as words) break down into smaller…
  • The Awful Consequences of Prescriptivism.

    languagehat
    17 Oct 2014 | 4:47 pm
    From A Hack’s Progress (J. Cape, 1997), the autobiography of Phillip Knightly (this takes place in Fiji): The new editor, another New Zealander, drove Hanrahan, the sub-editor, mad with lectures on pedantic points of grammar. Late one night, overcome by the heat and tension, Hanrahan listened to half an hour on the use of the pluperfect, then snatched a painting off the editor’s wall and smashed it over his head. Understandably, he was fired. The printers, who had more to do with Hanrahan than with the editor, went on strike in his support. The clerical staff, who had more to do…
  • Kolmogorov.

    languagehat
    16 Oct 2014 | 5:14 pm
    I’m racing through Blindsight, by Peter Watts (grim and gripping, and recommended to sf fans… but the plural of plexus is plexuses, not “plexii,” for God’s sake — I just had to get that off my chest), and when “Kolmogorov complexity” was mentioned I thought “Surely that should be Kholmogorov?” Because холм [kholm] is the Russian word for ‘hill’ (the Slavic word is borrowed from Germanic, cf. English holm), and гора [gora] is ‘mountain,’ and, well, it just seemed obvious. But I looked it up and sure…
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    A Way with Words

  • I’ll Be Sheep-Dipped

    Alisen Hazzard
    10 Oct 2014 | 9:31 am
    What a difference pronunciation makes! The United States has a Department of Defense, and an individual might take classes in self-defense. So why do football and basketball coaches say they’re proud of their . . . “DEE-fence?” Linguists have a theory about why. Also, some funny limericks to help you learn obscure words, and what you will and won’t find on a desert island. Plus, kennings, cobwebs, crestfallen, catillate, cataglossism, and more. This episode first aired October 10, 2014. Download the MP3.  The Omnificent English Dictionary In Limerick FormDo you…
  • Knighting Pun

    grantbarrett
    10 Oct 2014 | 8:51 am
    Dubbing someone a knight by tapping their shoulder with a sword is a venerable tradition, but that didn’t stop a wag from mocking it in limerick form with a groaner of a pun. This is part of a complete episode.
  • Lush Desert Islands

    grantbarrett
    10 Oct 2014 | 8:51 am
    Many desert islands don’t look like a desert at all. They’re lush and green. That’s because the term reflects the old sense of desert meaning “wild and uninhabited.” This is part of a complete episode.
  • Flu Limerick

    grantbarrett
    10 Oct 2014 | 8:51 am
    Steer clear of the flu. You’ll groan on wet sheets. You will mew. This is part of a complete episode.
  • Etymology of Cobwebs

    grantbarrett
    10 Oct 2014 | 8:51 am
    Cobwebs are the same thing as spiderwebs, and they get their name from the old English term coppe, meaning “spider,” which turns up in The Hobbit in a poem about an attercop. This is part of a complete episode.
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    Sinosplice » Life

  • Chinese Teachers: Use Your Chinese Names!

    John Pasden
    14 Oct 2014 | 6:25 pm
    Chinese teachers, please have your students call you by a Chinese name. You’re not helping them by calling yourself some easier-to-pronounce English name. I would have thought that this was obvious, but after all these years in the business, I can now see that it is not obvious to many otherwise well-meaning teachers. So I’ll spell it out here. (Please forward this to your Chinese teacher who doesn’t ask you to use a Chinese name in your interactions.) So why should students of Chinese call their Chinese teachers of Chinese by a Chinese name? I’m glad you asked……
  • Analysis Paralysis in Chinese Studies

    John Pasden
    8 Oct 2014 | 5:59 pm
    You’ve probably heard of analysis paralysis, but where does it come into Chinese studies? Studying a language is fairly straightforward, right? I’m referring not to being overly analytical about grammar, but rather about vocabulary. How can one be overly analytical about vocabulary? This is something that technology has made easy in recent years. Most of my AllSet Learning clients use Pleco or Anki to review vocabulary. Both have built-in SRS flashcard functionality, so doing occasional reviews pretty much solves that problem, right? Well, maybe… SRS drawbacks aside, certain…
  • Improbable Wifi

    John Pasden
    2 Oct 2014 | 5:41 pm
    I’d love to see a list of the most improbable places that have wifi in China. I had lunch at this little hole in the wall the other day, and snapped these pictures: Unfortunately I didn’t notice the wifi until I was on the way out. I do wonder how good the wifi was.
  • Missing Elevator Buttons

    John Pasden
    29 Sep 2014 | 6:40 pm
    I recently read China Simplified’s book, Language Gymnastics. It’s a great entertaining introduction to the Chinese language which combines Chinese and foreign perspectives. The book included this passage in chapter 4, which is aptly titled “Sorry, There Is No Chapter Four“: Enter a Hong Kong residential tower elevator and you’ll often discover buttons for floors labeled 3A, 12A and 15B–no doubt alternative universes guarded by daemons and fairies. Other times the 1st floor is renamed the “ground floor” (following British conventions) and the 2nd floor is…
  • Baidu Images Does Chinese Comics

    John Pasden
    23 Sep 2014 | 6:35 pm
    I’m kind of used to Baidu copying almost every initiative that Google comes out with, so it’s always interesting to see what Baidu does that’s consciously different from Google’s way. One such thing is Baidu Images. You’re probably used to Google’s search-centric approach. While you can search for images on Baidu too, Baidu takes a much more curated, discovery-based approach to the home page. Check out this screenshot: Oh, also there are lots of pictures of pretty girls. No matter what you search for. Apparently that’s just a Baidu thing. But also,…
 
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    AJATT | All Japanese All The Time

  • Why Are You Acting Like A Deadbeat Dad Language Learner?

    khatzumoto
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:59 pm
    The day you stop sucking at the language isn’t the end of the journey, it’s the beginning. Universities pay full, luscious lip service to this. Graduation is called “commencement”, at least in North America. But lip service it is. Full lusciousness notwithstanding. It’s said that most peoples learning — in fact, all nonfunctional reading — stops the day they leave school. But you and I are not most people. And I didn’t come to give you lip service today. My lips are chapped; it wouldn’t feel good. Baby care doesn’t end at birth.
  • What Can the French Revolution and Austrian Economics Teach You About Learning Japanese?

    khatzumoto
    10 Oct 2014 | 11:59 pm
    So, I’ve been reading about politics and history lately. Voltaire’s Bastards, Amaury de Riencourt, David Deutsch (The Beginning of Infinity), stuff like that. And I came upon something of a…how can I put this… It’s fashionable — and even justifiable — to roundly dismiss many of the heroes and products of the English-speaking world. Stop riding Newton’s nuts, Leibniz was just as good if not better — better calculus notation and a kanji lover. Stop cupping Darwin’s eye…balls, he was just kind of OK; he had a theory but no…
  • How Can I Turn Big, Complex Decisions Into Binary Decisions, Just Like the Cool Kids? Decision Binarization In Action: A Real Life Example

    khatzumoto
    5 Oct 2014 | 12:01 am
    This entry is part 6 of 6 in the series The First World Problem is ChoiceSo, one time, I had to make an appointment with the vet, for my cats, to get special shots for them so I could take them overseas, by plane, and thus have them hang out with me…overseas, as one does, and then also safely and expeditiously return to Japan. Now, I had ten choices for an appointment time. No…wait, that’s not what it was. It was a massage place. I think. They actually come over to your house and do, like, sports massage (roll with it) and…anyway, yeah, I had, like, ten options. And…
  • Why Everything You Do Wrong Is Right

    khatzumoto
    10 Jul 2014 | 11:59 pm
    You are not a screw-up. You are not lazy. You work hard. Too hard. At things that don’t matter. You work hard at struggling and self-blame and self-hate. You work hard at worrying. You work hard at pacing the floor. You work hard at imagining terrifying, low-probability contingencies. You work hard on trying to force yourself, like a stubborn camel, to do things you don’t want to do in a way you don’t want to do them. And it doesn’t work. It almost never works. So what do you do? USE EVEN MORE FORCE! You tell the whole world your goals, in order to force social…
  • What’s Wrong And Right With Vocabulary Lists — How To Use Them Without Being Used By Them

    khatzumoto
    5 Jul 2014 | 11:59 pm
    So I met a German girl at a cafe today…actually, she was Austrian but, same difference. Anyway, we got to talking about books and  I gave her a book recommendation, and it came out that I’ve only ever read the book in Japanese, so I had to find out what the English title was. She was shocked (or maybe surprised…whatever, same difference), and she talked about how she could never learn Japanese. And I was like, no way, of course you could. Because, here’s the thing. I have a lot of positive stereotypes about German people. There was my friend and neighbour Wolfgang…
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    separated by a common language

  • Henny Penny, Chicken Little, Chicken Licken

    lynneguist
    18 Oct 2014 | 2:38 pm
    While writing the other day, I wondered whether it would be widely understood if I used Chicken Little as a metaphor for a certain kind of language peever. It felt right, but I also knew the name Henny Penny (of the main character in the story--see comments for variations), both from my American childhood and from my child's English childhood. Then I got an email informing me that my Survey Monkey subscription had been auto-renewed for the next month. Which is to say, I had failed to notice the note in my (BrE) diary/(AmE) planner on Tuesday that said "UNSUBSCRIBE FROM SURVEY MONKEY". At that…
  • twang

    lynneguist
    16 Sep 2014 | 4:25 pm
    This is the kind of blog topic I love -- like the soup or bacon sandwich ones -- where I'm reporting on my slowly acquired reali{s/z}ation that there are subtle UK/US differences in meanings of certain familiar words. The meanings are so similar that they often refer to the same things. What's different is where the cent{er/re} and periphery of the meaning are. Because these differences are hard to tease out, we may go through conversations not reali{s/z}ing that we're not quite communicating. Of course, it's loving these kinds of things that got me to be a lexical semanticist in the first…
  • shallot

    lynneguist
    9 Sep 2014 | 4:48 pm
    Typically, as we've discussed before, two-syllable words from French are stressed on their first syllable in BrE and on the second in AmE -- BALlet versus balLET, BAton versus baTON, etc. (Please see and comment on the linked post if that's the issue you're interested in.)photo from: http://www.realseeds.co.uk/onions.htmlThis led me to wonder about shallotbecause it looks like a French borrowing (so many food words are), but the stress pattern is makes it look like it isn't:  BrE shalLOT versus AmE SHALlot or shalLOT. (You can hear them both in an American accent here.)  American…
  • herb

    lynneguist
    2 Sep 2014 | 5:03 pm
    When I started this blog, I wrote short little posts about things I noticed in British and American English. Few read them, and I usually managed to write three a week.  Since then, many more readers and commenters have appeared ([AmE] howdy! thank you!). As I imagine this larger audience responding to posts about X with "But what about Y?", I try to fit the Ys in.  Sometimes the Ys are other expressions that I could discuss; sometimes they are beliefs about language that may or may not have basis in reality. As a result, my posts have got(ten) much longer and less frequent. (The…
  • off-piste, off the beaten track/path, off base

    lynneguist
    1 Aug 2014 | 8:13 am
    Thought I'd dip into the 'to-be-blogged' e-mailbox and click randomly for the next topic, and wouldn't you know it: the thing I clicked on, a five-month-old note from Jan Freeman, is about off-piste, which I used in the last post, leading to some off-piste (and off-piste) discussion in the comments there. So, here I am discussing it again, but that's (orig. AmE) okay because I like things to have their own posts and because it leads me to a few other off- expressions.Off-piste has both literal and figurative uses in BrE. A piste (pronounced 'peest') was originally the path beaten by a horse…
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    Mr. Verb

  • They came for the verbs?

    12 Oct 2014 | 8:44 am
  • Grad students take note ...

    4 Aug 2014 | 5:51 am
    Be sure to credit xkcd when you use this approach. (And check out the roll over.)
  • Attack of the homophones!

    31 Jul 2014 | 8:19 pm
    Delightful story in the always delightful Wonkette about a guy who got fired for writing a blog post about homophones, because it sounded too ... icky.  It kind of sounded like another word, you might say.  Of course they had to use the tired old "cunning linguist" joke, but at least with a good graphic.I did guffaw a bit (but daintily) when I saw their picture of an illustration the firee used in his blog post:I mean, the very first one is a really bad example!  Tell me you don't look at it and say [rɛd] ~ [rijd].  And BTW, ant ~ aunt only works for some dialects.It's…
  • "Interested in regional and social differences in speech? We are too!"

    22 Jul 2014 | 8:14 am
    Just got an email with that subject line for a study about how people identify speakers of different dialects:Our research team at the University of Wisconsin is recruiting subjects for research on how people perceive and identify dialects of languages people speak. If you’d like to participate, just visit this link, and you’ll hear speech samples and can answer questions about them, e.g. where the speakers are from and whether you think they have strong accents.  The survey will not work on a smartphone; please only use a laptop, desktop, or tablet.If you have any questions…
  • Wisconsin Englishes update ...

    25 Jun 2014 | 12:53 pm
    Word on the street is that Wisconsin Englishes will be on Wisconsin Public Radio in western Wisconsin tomorrow, on Spectrum West with Al Ross.And the Wisconsin Englishes Project website has been spiffed up a little ... various updates and a bunch of teaching materials, etc. You can check it out here.
 
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    Learn French with daily podcasts

  • 2018 – Real Life French: 40%

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:08 pm
    Real life French Guide Welcome to your lesson of Real Life French. Each lesson we take a simple situation you may encounter in everyday life in France. Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :~
  • 2017 – Nouvelles tablettes (New tablets)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:05 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Apple a annoncé une nouvelle version de sa tablette, l’ipad Air 2, qui est l’appareil de son genre … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 2016 – Dépendant d’Internet (Addicted to net)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:03 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Un nombre significatif de jeunes adultes pourrait souffrir de troubles de dépendance à l’Internet…. Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 2015 – Avertissements (Warning signs)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 10:01 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Les avertissements pour les consommateurs relatifs au sport nécessaire pour brûler toutes les calories … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
  • 2014 – Une sangsue (Leech)

    contact@dailyfrenchpod.com (Dailyfrenchpod)
    18 Oct 2014 | 9:59 pm
    Learning Guide | PDF Transcript Une routarde a trouvé une sangsue de 7,5cm qui a vécu dans son nez pendant un mois après … Learn French now ! Listen to today’s lesson :
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    Brave New Words

  • Translated Literature for Children

    18 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Listen to this brief radio program on translating for children by translator, writer, and chair of Society of Authors (and my former colleague) Daniel Hahn.I have said much of what he says, but I suspect he says it better!
  • More on the Nobel Prize in Literature

    13 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    If you can read Swedish, this article on the Nobel Prize gives a bit more insight. Thank you to Duncan Large, now the head of the BCLT, for sending me the link.
  • 2014 Nobel Prize in Literature

    9 Oct 2014 | 10:35 am
    This year’s Nobel Prize in Literature has been awarded to Patrick Modiano.Is this what you expected? What do you think? I must admit he wasn't on my radar!
  • Hispabooks

    6 Oct 2014 | 4:00 pm
    I’ve recently learned about a new publisher based in Madrid, Hispabooks. I’m currently reading some of their first publications and hope to report back on them soon, but for now I thought I’d just give some information about the publisher.Hispabooks aims to translate Spanish literature to English and to promote it abroad. Here is some information I was sent:“Here in Spain around 30% of what's published every year is in translation, very specially from English, but as you may well know, the English book market has a much lower rate of books in translation, with their infamous 3% rate.
  • International Translation Day

    29 Sep 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Today is the feast day of St. Jerome and as he’s the patron saint of translators, that means today is International Translation Day. There are lots of events going on around the UK (and elsewhere, of course). How will you celebrate?Let’s all find a way of honouring translators and translations today!
 
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    English, Jack

  • On meeting 'otiose' twice again

    6 Oct 2014 | 10:30 am
    I asked Mark Liberman to have a look at what I wrote yesterday since I was struggling to get my head around the probabilities. He was kind enough to write the following guest post:Maybe a better way of thinking about it is this:Say the probability that word w_i will be selected at random from a collection of text is P(w_i). Then assuming independence, the probability that the next word will NOT be w_i is (1-P(w_i)), and the probability of failing to find w_i in N successive draws is(1-P(w_i))^NIf P(w_i) is 1/10^7 (one in ten million), and N is 1000, then we get(1-(1/10^7))^1000which is…
  • On meeting 'otiose' twice in a day

    5 Oct 2014 | 3:36 am
    Well, not in the same day, but certainly within a 24-hour period. As I was lying in bed last night, reading Charles Mann's 1493, I came across the phrase the otiose Percy on p. 78.As of this morning, I've read to p. 90, so that's about 4,500 words later. I also read a few NY Times articles, adding perhaps another 1,200 words. And then I set about to edit an article for Contact, the TESL Ontario magazine for which I'm the editor. Almost immediately, I came across a quote from David Crystal in which he wonders,whether the presence of a global language will eliminate the demand for world…
  • Climbing the grammar tree

    19 Sep 2014 | 12:04 am
    I've started a new blog called "Climbing the grammar tree". The idea is that I will respond to readings I'm doing for my doctoral studies, so check it out.
  • A title misparsed

    2 Sep 2014 | 2:23 pm
    This morning, I was reading this article at New Statesman, when I came across the following:Yet surely, when night after night atrocities are served up to us as entertainment, it's worth some anxiety. We become clockwork oranges if we accept all this pop culture without asking what's in it.The plural clockwork oranges suddenly threw into sharp relief the title of Burgess's book A clockwork orange. For some reason that I am unable to articulate now, if I ever was aware of it, I had always parsed that title like this:That is to say, I took orange to be a postpositive modifier of clockwork (like…
  • Antedating "determinative"

    19 Aug 2014 | 5:13 am
    The OED gives: b. Gram. determinative adjective, determinative pronoun, etc. (see quots.); determinative compound = tatpurusha n.1921   E. Sapir Lang. vi. 135   The words of the typical suffixing languages (Turkish, Eskimo, Nootka) are ‘determinative’ formations, each added element determining the form of the whole anew.1924   H. E. Palmer Gram. Spoken Eng. ii. 24   To group with the pronouns all determinative adjectives..shortening the term to determinatives.1933   L. Bloomfield Language xiv. 235   One…
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    Thoughts On Translation

  • Beyond the Basics of Freelancing: starts November 12

    Corinne McKay
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:00 pm
    The next session of my online course Beyond the Basics of Freelancing starts on November 12, and I have five spots open. This course is for mid-career freelancers who have established businesses, but want to earn more money, work with higher-quality agencies or direct clients, develop a clearer financial plan for their businesses and get […]
  • International development webinar: feedback and questions

    Corinne McKay
    14 Oct 2014 | 10:15 am
    This morning I presented a webinar for the ATA professional development series, entitled “Translating for the international development sector.” We didn’t have time to take questions, so if you have any, you can send them to me here. Also, if you have any feedback that you didn’t include on the evaluation, you can post it […]
  • How to decide if a translation specialization is viable?

    Corinne McKay
    13 Oct 2014 | 9:58 am
    A student in my online course asks: How do I decide if a translation specialization is viable? Hmm, interesting question, and one that nearly all freelancers have to grapple with at some point. Short answer: nearly any specialization is viable, depending on your marketing zeal and income needs. Longer answer follows. When you’re looking at […]
  • Freelance success: luck, hard work, or a combination of the two?

    Corinne McKay
    24 Sep 2014 | 1:06 pm
    It’s been interesting to read people’s reactions to my post about translator rants, and I always love a good and lively discussion. Here’s a followup: it seems to me that many translators look at “successful freelancers,” (with varying definitions of that), and think, “It’s easy to sit around and tell other, less successful freelancers what […]
  • Off-topic: How to keep blogging for a really long time

    Corinne McKay
    9 Sep 2014 | 1:17 pm
    …well, a “really long time” in Internet years. When I click “Publish” on this post, WordPress will cheerfully tell me that it’s the 552nd post that I’ve written since February of 2008, which is when I took Beth Hayden’s introductory blogging class and decided to give it a go. So my blog will be six […]
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    Global by Design

  • Apple continues to neglect its global gateway

    John Yunker
    8 Oct 2014 | 12:56 pm
    Every time Apple updates its web design (which it did recently) I get hopeful that the global gateway will receive a similar upgrade. But this has not yet happened. Apple’s global gateway remains firmly entrenched in the use of flags. And that’s unfortunate. Flags are not the best icons for global navigation. They are fraught with […]
  • One probable beneficiary of Scotland independence: .SCOT

    John Yunker
    18 Sep 2014 | 8:15 am
    So today is the big day for the people of Scotland as well as the UK. One question that occurs to country code geeks such as myself is what country code domain would Scotland use if/when it became separate from .UK? It turns out that one domain is already available right now: .scot. However, this isn’t technically a […]
  • What’s the ROI of web globalization?

    John Yunker
    10 Sep 2014 | 1:52 pm
    I’ve been meaning to write about this for awhile. A few months ago, Apple CEO Tim Cook reportedly said this at an investor meeting: “When we work on making our devices accessible by the blind,” he said, “I don’t consider the bloody ROI.” I love this quote. And I love any CEO who knows when the […]
  • What’s wrong with this global gateway?

    John Yunker
    3 Sep 2014 | 3:33 pm
    A few things. First, using flags to indicate language is almost always a mistake. Second, why are the language names all in English? Only the “English language” text needs to be in English. The purpose of the gateway is to communicate with speakers of other languages, not just English speakers. Finally, do we need “Language” at all? […]
  • Managing language expectations when you can’t translate everything

    John Yunker
    27 Aug 2014 | 2:30 pm
    I don’t know of any large company that translates all of its content into all of its target languages. I won’t go into the many reasons for why this is — money being the major reason — but I will say that if this is an issue you struggle with you’re not alone. The key to […]
 
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    Gilbane.com

  • Speaker Spotlight: Rahel Anne Bailie – Content marketing and content strategy not the same

    fgilbane
    3 Oct 2014 | 5:52 am
    As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference and will be sharing their complete answers with you here. This week we’re spotlighting Rahel Anne Bailie, Founder and Senior Content Strategy Consultant of Intentional Design Inc. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event. Speaker Spotlight: Rahel Anne Bailie Founder and Senior Content Strategy Consultant Intentional Design Inc. Follow Rahel: @rahelab   Given that…
  • HTML5 Proposed Recommendation Published – Call for Review

    Clea
    24 Sep 2014 | 10:05 am
    HTML5 Proposed Recommendation published on schedule. The HTML Working Group has published a Proposed Recommendation of “HTML5.” This specification defines the 5th major revision of the core language of the World Wide Web: the Hypertext Markup Language (HTML). In this version, new features are introduced to help Web application authors, new elements are introduced based on research into prevailing authoring practices, and special attention has been given to defining clear conformance criteria for user agents in an effort to improve interoperability. Comments are welcome…
  • Speaker Spotlight: Terena Bell – Multilingual challenges and the future

    Clea
    23 Sep 2014 | 6:41 am
    As we did last year we’ve posed some of our attendees’ most frequently asked questions to speakers who will be at this year’s Gilbane Conference, December 2 – 4, 2014, and will be sharing their complete answers with you here. You can see all Speaker Spotlights from our upcoming conference as well as last year’s event. Speaker Spotlight: Terena Bell CEO In Every Language Follow Terena: @ineverylanguage   Although sometimes used interchangeably ‘content strategy’ and ‘content marketing’ refer to very different though often connected…
  • Web Applications on Mobile: current state and roadmap

    Frank Gilbane
    19 Aug 2014 | 5:49 am
    The W3C has published the July 2014 edition of Standards for Web Applications on Mobile, an overview of the various technologies developed in W3C that increase the capabilities of Web applications, and how they apply more specifically to the mobile context. A deliverable of the HTML5Apps project, this edition of the document includes changes and additions since April 2014, notably a new section covers the emerging field of integrated payments on the Web, following recent work started by W3C in this space. Learn more about the Web and Mobile Interest Group (WebMob). If you think you have…
  • Gilbane Conference schedule – sneak peek

    Frank Gilbane
    31 Jul 2014 | 11:43 am
    The full program will be published in a week or so, but the schedule is available now at http://gilbaneconference.com/2014/Schedule.  
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    Web-Translations » Blog Posts

  • International SEO: Is server location important?

    Jennifer Rodgers
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:07 am
    Managing a successful international web strategy would be much simpler if one hosting company could host multiple local domains on local servers through a single control panel. Unfortunately, this is not the case. If you have purchased unique domains for the different languages of your website, you can: host all of your languages/domains in one country OR host individual languages/domains in the target countries Where should you host a multilingual website? It’s a question our customers have been asking us for years. Back in 2011, our MD, Daniel Rajkumar, blogged about server location…
  • 6 resources every translator should use

    Jennifer Rodgers
    14 Oct 2014 | 4:53 am
    Contrary to what some may think, not all translators sit alone in a dark room, typing furiously, using only a dusty old dictionary for reference. Translation has moved on! It is more than just one opinion, one draft, one dog-eared dictionary. Translators, like lawyers, refer to myriad sources to select the best terminology, cite examples of similar contexts, delve into background information, and so on. Six resources you should be using Your Internet Browser Everyone has their favourite web browser – learn how to use yours to its fullest, as you probably use it regularly. In Internet…
  • Terms Website Owners need to know

    Cassandra Oliver
    10 Oct 2014 | 1:50 am
    The post Terms Website Owners need to know appeared first on Web-Translations.
  • Infographic: What are websites made of?

    Cassandra Oliver
    3 Oct 2014 | 3:51 am
    The post Infographic: What are websites made of? appeared first on Web-Translations.
  • Voiceover or Subtitles – how should video be translated?

    Cassandra Oliver
    15 Sep 2014 | 1:05 am
    When  it comes to localising video content, you have a choice of using either subtitles on screen or a voice-over of any dialogue or narration. The best option for your needs will depend on several factors, and of course budget is a consideration too. Here we share advice from Alistair Langfield from our specialist voiceover & subtitling partner, Matinée. There are two main methods of translating video: Subtitles A translation which the viewer reads on screen while the foreign language narrative or dialogue remains on the recording Voiceover/dubbing Where a translated version of the…
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    Russian Language Blog

  • Time Paradoxes in Russian

    Maria
    16 Oct 2014 | 4:42 am
    Image by loppear on flickr.com Human perception of time is culture-specific, so it’s no wonder that simply learning the words to talk about time is not enough. You need to understand how Russian speakers see time so their words and actions can start making sense to you. Time of the day is organic… You probably learned time of the day (врмя сток) in your elementary Russian course. If so, you may remember that тро (morning), (day/afternoon), вчер (evening), and (night) follow our internal clock more than they respect the formal am/pm distinction. For example,…
  • Trade Your Life for a Joke?

    Jenya
    14 Oct 2014 | 10:57 pm
    Laughs by Mark Kjerland on flickr.com What does it feel like to be arrested for retelling a joke, or even an anecdote? For those living in Russia during Stalin’s reign, it was a reality. Gulags were home to not just societies most dangerous and, therefore, worthy criminals; professors, doctors, all sorts of educated professionals could also call it home – some for sharing the jokes and anecdotes found in a collection entitled “Laughing Under the Covers.” Living in the Soviet Union meant that the state controlled virtually everything and in such a society, it is easier…
  • Expressions for Navigating Russian Bureaucracy

    Maria
    9 Oct 2014 | 12:22 am
    Image by Tulane Public Relations on flickr.com I almost felt disingenuous as I typed the title of this post. Russian bureaucracy is notorious for penetrating all layers of society. However, there are certain concepts repeated in your daily interactions in Russia. An average person in Russia will know what they are and when they are used. Here are the top bureaucratic concepts that come to mind.  1. Нотариально заверенный Technically, this means “notarized” — like a notarized copy or translation (нотарильно завренная…
  • Who is Cheburashka and How Can He Help You?

    Jenya
    6 Oct 2014 | 10:18 pm
    Chebyrashka by Martin Abegglen on flickr.com Being that most of you are devoting your precious time and energy toward learning to speak Russian, I decided to introduce you to a new tool that may help you, as well as entertain you at the same time. This tool is called Cheburashka. What is Cheburashka you ask? Cheburashka is a fictional character created for children during the mid 1960’s by Russian writer, Eduard Uspensky. This cute little character made his debut on film a few years later. I recently discovered episodes of this show with english subtitles. Even though we may not all…
  • How to be an artist in Russian

    Maria
    2 Oct 2014 | 12:50 am
    Image by Jamie McCaffrey on flickr.com We have already talked about photography, so I thought it may be nice to learn to talk about other visual arts. I am not a very skilled or advanced artist, so I will concentrate on the basics. Feel free to ask me or your fellow readers for anything I don’t mention in this post! Techniques First, Russian does not lexically distinguish between drawing and painting. Both are known as рисовние. If you would like to specify the exact kind, you need to give more information about the medium/technique. The art itself is called жвопись.
 
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    Polish Language Blog

  • Poland’s linguistic affiliation

    Kasia
    9 Oct 2014 | 3:40 pm
    Polish belongs to the west Slavic group of languages of the Indo-European language family, which in turn is part of the Nostratic macrofamily. Poles use the Latin alphabet. Literary Polish developed during the sixteenth century and is based on the speech of educated city people, upper class usage, and the Great Polish and Little Polish Dialects. Starting in the nineteenth century, technological and cultural changes introduced a new vocabulary. During the 1920s and 1930s, there was an attempt to coin and introduce a Polish-derived vocabulary for the newly diffused technology. Otherwise, the…
  • Which soft drinks Poles like the most?

    Kasia
    8 Oct 2014 | 4:24 pm
    We all know that anytime people think about Poles and their drinking habits – vodka screams at us! Yes, part of it is true. Just like each country has specific food and drinks that is popular there. Poles are used to drinking shots of vodka…but I have to say that usually opinion about it is exaggeration. Now how about soft drinks? Which ones are popular in Poland? I can definitely tell you that when I was growing up…I barely tasted soda. Kompot (compote) has been always on the table. Image by funtik.cat on Flickr.com Compotes are drinks prepared of fruits – usually fresh,…
  • Polish cuisine in the history

    Kasia
    3 Oct 2014 | 12:23 pm
    The Polish cuisine (kuchnia polska) in the Middle Ages was based on dishes made of agricultural produce (millet, rye, wheat – proso, żyto, pszenica), meats of wild and farm animals and fruits, herbs and local spices. It was known above all from abundant salt using and permanent presence of groats (kasze). A high calorific value of dishes and drinking the beer as a basic drink (unlike the wine spread in south and west Europe) was typical of Middle Ages Polish cuisine. A beer and a mead (piwo i miód pitny) were most popular drink for a lot of time, but with time an expensive wine,…
  • How many holidays in October 2014 in Poland?

    Kasia
    1 Oct 2014 | 3:26 pm
    Image by DixieBelleCupcakeCafe on Flickr.com I was very surprised once I researched Polish holidays this month! 22 different special days this month (Październik – October)! Can you believe it? On the top of this month being Breast Cancer awareness month, there are many different things to think of almost every day this month Here is the list: 1st – Światowy Dzień Wegetarianizmu, Międzynarodowy Dzień Ludzi Starszych, Międzynarodowy Dzień Lekarza, Międzynarodowy Dzień Muzyki (World Day of Vegetarianism, The International Day of Older People, International Day of…
  • How not to love autumn?

    Kasia
    29 Sep 2014 | 7:38 pm
    Image by DaDaAce on Flickr.com Autumn is my favorite time of the year! A lot of people in Poland think about fall as a very said, rainy season. I always find something beautiful and positive in it though… Jak nie kochać jesieni… (How not to love autumn…) Tadeusz Wywrocki   Jak nie kochać jesieni, jej babiego lata, Liści niesionych wiatrem, w rytm deszczu tańczących. Ptaków, co przed podróżą na drzewach usiadły, Czekając na swych braci, za morze lecących. How not to love autumn, it’s gossamer Leaves carried by the wind, dancing in the rain rhythm…
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    Ingls na Ponta da Lngua

  • A diferença entre strange, odd e weird

    Denilso de Lima
    15 Oct 2014 | 7:36 pm
    Pode parecer estranho mas as palavras strange, odd e weird podem ser traduzidas por estranho em português. Isso faz com que muita gente pergunte quando deve usar uma outra; afinal, qual é a diferença entre strange, odd e weird? Será que tem alguma? Vejamos! Para resolver a confusão, pesquisei o uso de cada uma dessas palavras em dicionários e livros diferentes. Então vamos ver o que eles dizem. O Oxford Learner’s Thesaurus – a dictionary of synonyms diz que strange e odd podem ser usados quase que de modo idêntico. Ou seja, em alguns casos tanto faz usar uma palavra quanto a…
  • Aprender 2000 Palavras em Inglês e a Fluência

    Denilso de Lima
    14 Oct 2014 | 11:29 am
    Você já ouviu dizer que se aprender 2000 palavras em inglês, você será capaz de falar inglês fluentemente? Alguns costumam dizer que até mesmo 1500 palavras são o suficiente para atingir a fluência. De onde foi que tiraram essa ideia!? Será mesmo possível!? Como!? Neste artigo, você vai entender como funciona um dos maiores truques usados para ganhar dinheiro das pessoas oferecendo cursos de inglês milagrosos. Para facilitar, vamos começar pelo começo. O Início de Tudo Em 1953, um senhor de nome Michael Phillip West, professor de inglês e pesquisador, apresentou um trabalho…
  • Quando usar Many ou Much?

    Denilso de Lima
    13 Oct 2014 | 8:24 pm
    Quando usar many ou much? Aí está uma dúvida que atormenta muita gente! Geralmente, a dúvida ocorre pois causa do modo como elas são explicadas. Ao tratar do assunto, muitos livros, professores e escolas, tentam fazer com que você entenda primeiro a noção de Countable e Uncountable Nouns para só depois irem para o tema de quando usar many ou much. Será que há uma maneira diferente de aprender quando usar many ou much sem precisar entrar na velhas e cansativas explicações gramaticais? Countable e Uncountable Nouns é sim algo interessante, mas o que você realmente quer é…
  • Como dizer pavio curto em inglês?

    Denilso de Lima
    9 Oct 2014 | 10:48 am
    Pavio curto é uma expressão usada para dizer que alguém fica com raiva muito facilmente. Geralmente, dizemos que alguém é pavio curto ou tem pavio curto. Em português, você sabe como é, mas como dizer pavio curto em inglês? Uma expressão usada em inglês é “short fuse”. Mas, lembre-se que em inglês é comum dizermos “have a short fuse”. Portanto, se você quiser dizer algo como “meu irmão tem pavio curto”, em inglês será “my brother has a short fuse”. Veja outros exemplos: A person with a short fuse has to be handled diplomatically. (Uma pessoa com pavio curto…
  • O que significa a chip off the old block?

    Denilso de Lima
    9 Oct 2014 | 9:58 am
    Quer saber o que significa a chip off the old block? Então, anote aí que essa expressão é usada para ser referir a uma pessoa – geralmente um homem – que se comporta da mesma maneira como o pai ou que possui características físicas que lembram o pai. Em português, é o mesmo que dizer “a cara do pai” ou “(ser) o pai todinho”. Em alguns casos, podemos traduzi-las por expressões que transmitam essa ideia. Até mesmo com o famoso “filho de peixe, peixinho é” ou “tal pai, tal filho”. Veja os exemplos: Bill is a chip off the old block. He behaves just like his father.
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    BeatBabel - The Art of Localization

  • Dog cage and Execute

    26 Sep 2014 | 5:05 pm
    The Chinese B2B giant Alibaba goes global financially, not so much linguistically In the famous folk tale Ali Baba and the Forty Thieves, two words, Open Sesame, open the doors to a secret cave hollowed by the hand of man and full of rich bales of merchandise, including silk, gold and silver. Last week, the homonymous B2B giant opened its doors through one of the most anticipated IPOs of the year; however, to the surprise of its international users, the cave of wonders was full of trinkets.  The words Sesam Öffne Dich! granted German users access to the fascinating world of “hair…
  • It’s 2012 and you are still using Trados 2007?

    25 Apr 2012 | 4:44 pm
    The translation process dates back to ancient times but technology has changed our jobs and working methods quite a bit. CAT (Computer-assisted translation) tools make our jobs easier, more accurate and more efficient. Nowadays, in order to provide the client with a quote, the files first need to be analyzed, and based on word repetitions and matches against a TM (Translation Memory) or a previously translated document, the rates can be more competitive. For the sake of exemplifying how a CAT tool can save you a lot of grief, we’ll refer to one of our most recent upgrades: SDL Trados Studio…
  • Happy Friday!

    27 Jan 2012 | 7:00 am
  • On native languages and hometowns...

    25 Jan 2012 | 3:46 pm
    Spanish is my native language. That is the language my parents spoke to each other when they fell in love, the language in which I said my first word, the language I learnt to love. It is the epicenter of my identity. However, identity is a complicated matter, especially if you come from a complicated place…I was probably not even a year old the first time I traveled to a country other than the one where I was born. In those days, it wasn’t much of a hassle to cross the border to San Diego, and so we did it all the time. Sunday mornings meant ten people cramped in my Great Grandmother’s…
  • Think Latin America, Silicon Valley

    13 May 2011 | 11:01 am
    A diverse array of localization industry professionals from all over the world were brought together last Friday at The Mountain Winery in Silicon Valley. And for what purpose?... to spotlight Latin America and discuss the region’s booming market, business opportunities and uniqueness for the second edition of the “Think Latin America” conference, organized by the “Women in Localization” group , IMTT and Ccaps Translation. BeatBabel drove all the way up with 4 team members and the event was well worth the drive!Latin America, the region of the world spanning from the northernmost…
 
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    Babel's Dawn

  • Bickerton: Round Two

    Blair
    12 Oct 2014 | 12:59 pm
    A few years back Derek Bickerton published a book called Adam's Tongue which I reviewed in three posts (here, here and here). That book was disappointingly breezy, a lively account that made bold assertions and brushed objections aside with the swat of a hand. Say this for the guy, he's willing to keep plugging. Earlier this year he published an entirely non-breezy account of his theory: More than Nature Needs — Language, Mind, and Evolution. After reading the book I went back and read my old posts on the first work. I find that the theory has changed only a bit but the process is much more…
  • The End of Orthodoxy?

    Blair
    5 Oct 2014 | 6:49 pm
    Rejecting Aristotle is always a sign of a break with scientific orthodoxy. The past month has been bad for orthodox linguists. First came the Surprise Meeting at the Summit which showed that instead of searching for new empirical data or even new theoretical arguments (metaphysics), orthodox linguistics has turned to politics to patrol its turf. Next came two consecutive posts (here and here) on a paper reporting a review of empirical studies that indicates brain circuitry divides language into a basic syntax that deals with the concrete world that one can point to, and an extended syntax…
  • Syntax Eases Communication (Well duh)

    Blair
    29 Sep 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Yesterday I posted [here] a description of Maggie Tallerman's retort [abstract here] to the thought-firsters' idea that language evolved as a means of improved thought by allowing concepts to combine; we only later developed a way to externalize the thought as speech or signing. In that post I presented Tallerman's argument that words and concepts are not interchangeable and that words alone have properties that allow meaningful combinations. They get those properties via common usage. Today I want to look at her treatment of syntax. Basically, she makes the same point: the rules of syntax…
  • Chasing Leprechaun Gold

    Blair
    28 Sep 2014 | 3:18 pm
    Have linguists been hunting for a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow? The argument in favor of language beginning as personal thought is now dead and should be buried. What? You have always assumed language began as a tool for telling things to one another? You must be new to this blog. At the start of this month I posted a report on a paper by Bolhuis et al. that rehashes the argument that language began as a new and improved way of thinking. Speech and signing came only later when internal thinking was "externalized." Technically speaking, there was a mutation that improved the way an…
  • Dolphins Know Each Other by Name

    Blair
    15 Sep 2014 | 3:23 pm
    Signature whistles can be heard in a variety of dolphin species. Suppose I had an eight-month old baby who liked to say something like gork, and I told you that one day I heard the baby's two-year-old brother make a perfect imitation of the gork sound, to which the baby responded, hello. Would you conclude from this evidence that the baby is already using language? Careful, for it seems that bottlenose dolphins can participate in these sorts of exchanges. While most people agree that only people use language, there does not appear to be nearly as much agreement on what makes language so…
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    Macmillan

  • Word roots and routes: pair

    Jonathan Marks
    20 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Next in a series of posts exploring some of the ‘roots’ and ‘routes’ of English vocabulary. Pair (noun and verb) has made its way to us from Latin pār, meaning ‘equal’. As well as describing a set of two identical or near-identical items – e.g. a pair of shoes, a pair of eyes – it […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Language and words in the news – 17th October, 2014

    Liz Potter
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Language tip of the week: public school

    Liz Potter
    16 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in usage in American and British English of the... [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Life skills tip of the week: ways of warning someone

    Liz Potter
    14 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Learning about pragmatics and how to express yourself successfully is a useful life skill, said Michael Rundell in January when he introduced the new pragmatics series on Macmillan Dictionary. The series is part of the Macmillan Life Skills campaign, offering free resources for English language students and teachers each month. As part of the... [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
  • Enthusing about freedom of usage

    Stan Carey
    13 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Writing about back-formation earlier this year, I said that enthuse – a verb back-formed from enthusiasm – occupied a grey area of acceptability. This area is worth mapping in more detail, since much of what people say about enthuse applies to other words and usages, and offers insights into what Macmillan Dictionary calls real grammar. […] [This is a content excerpt only. Visit our blog for the full post].
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    Pimsleur Approach Blog

  • Battle of the Languages: Mandarin vs. Cantonese – What Language is Right for You?!

    Lukasz Wilkowski
    14 Oct 2014 | 7:43 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com It can be tough choosing what language to learn, especially when it comes to Chinese. There are a multitude of factors to consider. Do you want to use the language for business or socializing, or are you learning purely for fun? Where and when do you plan to use it? What difficulties does each language pose? And the most important question of them all: Which language is the right one for you? And don’t think you’ll get by all over China by learning just one of them. Although Mandarin and Cantonese share the same written characters, the pronunciations…
  • The Ultimate Guide to Hassle-Free Shopping in London

    Pimsleur Approach
    7 Oct 2014 | 6:58 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com As any Englishman or frequent visitor will attest, London attracts a plethora of tourists. Of course, the summer months and Christmas are particularly hectic, but given the year-round influx of out-of-towners, London is always a very busy place. This can make shopping and getting around pretty stressful, particularly if you’re trying to navigate the heaving throngs around Oxford Circus, home to the perma-mobbed Topshop flagship store. But it is possible to dodge the crowds; locals know how to avoid the masses when they need to get in a bout of weekend…
  • Happy Birthday Moulin Rouge! Celebrate 125 Years of a Legendary Paris Landmark

    Laura Mundow
    2 Oct 2014 | 7:03 am
    Image Credit: commons.wikimedia.org On October 6, 1889, Charles Zidler and Joseph Oller in the Pigalle district of Paris opened the Moulin Rouge cabaret. It opened the same year as the Eiffel Tower was built, and both have become legendary, enduring and unmistakable symbols of Paris. Moulin Rouge has survived the death of the Belle Époque, two World Wars, economic and political crises, a devastating fire and multiple changes of purpose. Yet today, it stands unbowed, world famous and thriving and subject of countless movies, books and documentaries, including, of course, Baz Luhrmann’s…
  • Perfecting the Art of Language Learning: A Story Told by Pimsleur’s Customer of the Month

    Pimsleur Approach
    30 Sep 2014 | 6:10 am
    Customer of the Month: Kristy Lacroix It has been estimated that 450 million people internationally speak Spanish, making it the second most widely spoken tongue on Earth. A report by the Cervantes Institute estimates that by 2030 this figure will have risen to 535 million or 7.5 per cent of the Earth’s population, with only Chinese being more commonly spoken. Spanish is the official language of 21 countries, but it is used far more widely, particularly in the United States where, in some areas it is more common than English. For this reason it should come as no surprise that this month’s…
  • Celebrate International Coffee Day: Favorite Recipes From Around the World!

    Will Noble
    26 Sep 2014 | 6:54 am
    Image Credit: @ Think Stock dot com How Many of These Coffee Styles Have You Tried? Coffee is a truly international drink – imbibed all over, but with a different twist in just about every country. To celebrate International Coffee Day on September 29, we’ve picked our favorite coffees from across the globe. Some are classics you’ve probably sampled before; others are somewhat more esoteric. Enjoy our heady brew of caffeine delights! Ireland: Irish coffee The Irish may not be overly inventive when it comes to their coffee names, but the Irish coffee is an inspired winter…
 
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    Globalization Partners International - Blog

  • Arabic Translation History

    19 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Translation has always been the great enabler of communication between nations allowing for the transfer of meaning across daily business, cultural, and religious activities. Arabic translation has its deep roots in the ancient history of mankind. Arabic cultures have always had an intrinsic role in spreading knowledge and science across nations throughout the ages. Arabic translation dates back to the 2nd century, when Arabs translated Persian history into Arabic, and it went through several stages of transformation since then. From mere interpretation among the Arabic traders and…
  • Website Translation with GPI and EPiServer

    5 Oct 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Multilingual Website Solutions with EPiServer EPiServer CMS is a fantastic Web Content Management System that supports multilingual websites and derives its strong capabilities from its Microsoft .NET Platform. EPiServer's latest version 7.5 provides a great set of options to support and manipulate multiple languages not only for content but also for EPiServer's new e-Commerce version. EPiServer users now can easily enable and manage multi-language output for Pages, Shared blocks, Local blocks and also e-Commerce Catalogs. As a Certified EPiServer Solution Partner, GPI helps EPiServer clients…
  • How Multilingual is your Mobile Device?

    23 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    In this three-part series we will look at the mobile device market, the current leading operating systems and their multilingual support and configuration requirements, followed by tips on how to use mobile devices during international travel and the best mobile apps when criss-crossing the globe. Worldwide Smartphone Vendor Market Share So let's first look at the mobile device market, vendor share and leading operation systems that currently rule the landscape: According to the International Data Corporation (IDC) worldwide smartphone shipments exceeded the 300 million mark in a single…
  • Top Tips for Gaming Translation and Localization

    22 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    As I was born in the early 1980's in Taiwan, playing Nintendo games was one of the most exciting entertainment and social activities with siblings, friends and neighbors.  At the time those games were stored on cassettes and most of them were labeled in Japanese only.   When we went to buy or exchange the cassettes, we had to guess by the images and the Kanji (Japanese characters) we could recognize on the packaging and determine whether the game would be a fun game or not.  After getting the game home, another challenge was to figure out how to play the game with…
  • Android Provides a World of Language Support

    13 Sep 2014 | 5:00 pm
    In the 9 years since Google acquired Android it has grown to be the world's most popular mobile operating system. To do so the Google Android team developed language support features so that Android OS-based phones fully function in the language of the user's choice. Here is a view of how much of the world has accepted Android (Table by Canalys): The list of languages currently supported within Android are: Language Language Code Afrikaans af Amharic am Bulgarian bg Catalan ca Chinese (PRC) zh-CN Chinese (Taiwan) zh-TW Croatian hr Czech cs Danish da Dutch nl English (UK) en-GB English (US)…
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    Lexiophiles

  • “Thinking Is My Fighting”: Virginia Woolf’s Life and Thoughts at the National Portrait Gallery

    Benedetta
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:01 am
    “There is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.” (V.W.) The National Portrait Gallery (London) is hosting an exhibition about Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) entitled “Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision”. Curated by Frances Spalding, a British art historian, critic and biographer, the exhibition unfolds Woolf’s life in chronological order, showing portraits, photographs, manuscripts and objects that belonged to her. On the website of the exhibition, it is possible to enjoy an audio tour explaining the 6 parts in which it is divided: Prologue: it…
  • “Il pensiero è la mia forma di combattimento”: La vita e il pensiero di Virginia Woolf in mostra alla National Portrait Gallery

    Benedetta
    20 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    “There is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.” (V.W.) “Non c’è cancello, non c’è catenaccio che possa rinchiudere la libertà della mia mente” (V.W.) La National Portrait Gallery (Londra) ospita una mostra su Virginia Woolf (1882-1941) intitolata “Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision”. A cura di Frances Spalding, storica dell’arte, critica e biografa britannica, la mostra espone in ordine cronologico ritratti, fotografie, manoscritti e oggetti appartenuti alla Woolf. Sul sito della mostra, è possibile fruire di un…
  • How Would A World Without Languages Look Like?

    Madalin
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:01 am
    With the risk of being accused of using a deceitful title, the question I am more interested in answering is…what if all the humans of our planet (so disregarding any other planets) would understand each other – if they would basically speak the same language? In a world without any languages, we would all presumably look each other in the eyes meaningfully and that would be the end of our interaction – but how would the world look like with only 1 language spoken by everyone? Attempts have been made throughout history to address the issue:  in Medieval Europe, Latin was widely…
  • Cum ar arăta lumea fără limbi străine?

    Madalin
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:00 am
    Cu riscul de a fi acuzat că mă folosesc de titluri ce induc în eroare, întrebarea de care sunt cu adevărat interesat este în fapt…cum ar fi dacă toți oamenii de pe planetă (ignorând toate celelalte planete, desigur) s-ar înțelege unul cu altul – dacă practic ar vorbi aceeași limbă? Cum ar arăta lumea unei limbi unice, înțeleasă de toată lumea? Hai să vedem. Au fost diverse încercări de-a lungul istoriei: în Europa Evului Mediu, latina era folosită de către literați; în perioada modernă timpurie a Europei se foloseau diverse limbi comerciale (”lingua…
  • How To Make A Translator Hate You

    Jennifer
    16 Oct 2014 | 1:01 am
    All professions have their quirks, but translators are a unique bunch. Add to that the many misconceptions there are about what we do and what it actually takes to do the job, and you get some entertaining situations when you tell someone you just met that you are a translator. Here is a brief list of things to avoid if someone doesn’t want to ruin any chances upon meeting a lover of words and languages, with real life quotes to make your read more enjoyable. 1 – Google translator: This deserves an article in itself. Don’t get me wrong, it’s an awfully useful app, but if you believe…
 
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    Dado Que - Latest Content

  • Doubts With Soccer in Spanish? The Linguistic Coach Has the Answers

    20 Oct 2014 | 9:00 am
    What the hell is a tiquitaca? Is it fúbol or futbol? How do you say MVP in Spanish? If you have doubts with soccer in Spanish you should follow the weekly boards of Fundéu’s linguistic coach. Yes, the Fundéu (Fundación de Español Urgente) publishes a weekly infographic called Jugada Lingüistica or Linguistic Play where they give valuable tips on how to use soccer terms in Spanish. The infographics are really nice (visually and content wise) because they explain soccer terms, show examples and gives vocabulary alternatives from Spain or Latin America. Now that the World Cup is just…
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       Medical Translation Insight

  • We're looking for a Senior Technology Strategist

    ForeignExchange Translations
    3 Oct 2014 | 8:49 am
    ForeignExchange is having another amazing growth year. To support our growing organization, new and growing client relationships, new service offerings, and an expanded geographic footprint, we are looking to hire a technology leader.The Senior Technology Strategist identifies, prioritizes and manages the execution of creating solutions using a set of application platforms supported by the
  • Primer: Linguistic validation

    ForeignExchange Translations
    5 Aug 2014 | 9:52 am
    Increasingly, large-scale clinical trial programs are conducted in non-English countries, and the need to translate and adapt clinical trial documentation for use in other than the source language continues to rise in demand. A key methodology for the evaluation of therapies is the randomized controlled trial. These clinical trials traditionally relied on relatively objective clinical outcome
  • 5 great resources for medical translation research

    ForeignExchange Translations
    31 Jul 2014 | 9:55 am
    Researching medical terminology is a big and important part of every medical translator's professional life. There are hundreds of resources for medical translators online - for different language pairs and different areas of specialization. Karen Sexton compiled five especially useful tools on her blog. Here is how she selected them:Medilexicon: This dictionary also features in my dictionaries
  • 25th Life Sciences roundtable at Localization World

    ForeignExchange Translations
    5 Jun 2014 | 11:51 am
    The 25th edition of Localization World kicked off in Dublin on Tuesday with the Life Science roundtable. With 24 attendees, this was one of the largest roundtables to-date. A number of topics were discussed ranging from the new trends towards content "digitalization" and what it means to medical translation suppliers. As in the past, there were a number of sessions on technology. The panel on
  • Translation 101: Developing Product Documentation with the World in mind

    FxConferences
    3 Jun 2014 | 9:56 am
    Thursday June 12th, 20148:30am Breakfast and Networking9:00am – 11:00am Presentation and Discussion Translation is an arcane discipline, where state-of-the-art technology comes together with a very human process. Done well, medical translations can save lives by getting products to market faster with the vital information needed for safe, correct use. But it can be expensive and time-consuming,
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    JLPT Boot Camp - The Ultimate Study Guide to passing the Japanese Language Proficiency Test

  • JLPT BC 146 | Travel to Matsuyama with Me

    Clayton MacKnight
    15 Oct 2014 | 6:31 pm
    Phew, that was a bit of a long train ride. It seems like Matsuyama is such a long way from most of the major cities in Japan. And it really feels like it too. I heard there are around 500,000 people here, but it is a pretty sleepy town. It’s good to get away from the crowds you know? All right, well, that’s Matsuyama castle, but I’m a bit exhausted from the trip, I don’t really feel like hiking up there today. We will visit it tomorrow after we have had some time to relax and get a feel for the city. First things first, let’s take a tram to Dogoonsen station.
  • JLPT Study Guide Month 9

    Clayton MacKnight
    8 Oct 2014 | 6:22 pm
    This is a continuing series going over a sample JLPT study guide. If you are just joining the discussion, you might want to check out month 1, month 2, month 3, month 4, month 5, month 6, month 7, and month 8 before continuing. In the past, when I prepared for the JLPT, I always kept simply doing what I was doing until the final day before the test. I didn’t really see a need to change up my study routine that much before the big day. After all, what could you possible change that would make a difference a few months before the big exam? Well, working with and talking to a couple of…
  • FluentU gets Support for Japanese

    Clayton MacKnight
    30 Sep 2014 | 8:48 am
    You’ve probably heard that the best thing for you to do when you learn a language is to try to get your hands on as much native material as possible, and expose yourself to it on a regular if not constant basis.  But this is easier said than done.  Japanese can be especially tricky, because you first have to literally learn to read the language in order to start absorbing printed content.  You can probably pick up hiragana and katakana in an intense week or over a month or two, but kanji, that is completely different. And, because of this limitation it can be often hard to find level…
  • JLPT BC 145 | The Only Constant is Change

    Clayton MacKnight
    24 Sep 2014 | 7:19 am
    I used to be a huge Garfield fan growing up. I read all his comics and thought that they were the best. For my 8th birthday, my parents even made me a Garfield shaped cake and decorated it perfectly. I had a stuffed Garfield toy that I dragged with everywhere I went. It was my friend and companion on many adventures. But eventually I grew out of that stage. I stopped taking Garfield on car trips. And he ended up getting thrown under a pile of stuff in a closet somewhere. I grew up and moved on. Old study habits are kind of like those trusty stuffed animals you had. They were great. They were…
  • JLPT N5 Grammar: Telling Time and Using Counters in Japanese

    Clayton MacKnight
    16 Sep 2014 | 5:33 pm
    This month, we are going to be learning about how to tell time of the day as well as days of the month.  We will also go over how to use the major counter words in Japanese.  Do you know what the native Japanese numbers are?  How do you talk about quantities in Japanese?  I go over all that and more in the video below: For more videos like this one, be sure to subscribe to the JLPT N5 Grammar YouTube Channel Or check out some of the other N5 grammar videos: Japanese adjectives Japanese adjectives – past tense Japanese adjectives – polite past tense Japanese particle wa…
 
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    Macmillan

  • Word roots and routes: pair

    Jonathan Marks
    20 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Next in a series of posts exploring some of the ‘roots’ and ‘routes’ of English vocabulary. Pair (noun and verb) has made its way to us from Latin pār, meaning ‘equal’. As well as describing a set of two identical or near-identical items – e.g. a pair of shoes, a pair of eyes – it is also used for certain single items consisting of two symmetrical or similar parts which are physically joined together – e.g. a pair of trousers, a pair of glasses, a pair of scissors; in many languages, the names of these items are simple singular nouns. Pair also forms the…
  • Language and words in the news – 17th October, 2014

    Liz Potter
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    This post contains a selection of links related to language and words in the news. These can be items from the latest news, blog posts or interesting websites related to global English, language change, education in general, and language learning and teaching in particular. Feel free to contact us if you would like to submit a link for us to include, or just add a comment to the post, with the link(s) you’d like to share. Language change and slang Cajuns are fiercely proud of their culture, but they’re divided over the word ‘coonass’ Whatever its origins, coonass isn’t…
  • Language tip of the week: public school

    Liz Potter
    16 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    In this weekly post, we bring more useful content from the Macmillan Dictionary to English language learners. These tips are usually based on areas of English which learners find difficult, e.g. spelling, grammar, collocation, synonyms, usage, etc. This week’s language tip helps with the differences in usage in American and British English of the term public school: In the UK, a public school is a private institution for young people between the ages of 13 and 18 whose parents pay for their education. The students often live at the school during the school term. American speakers usually…
  • Life skills tip of the week: ways of warning someone

    Liz Potter
    14 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Learning about pragmatics and how to express yourself successfully is a useful life skill, said Michael Rundell in January when he introduced the new pragmatics series on Macmillan Dictionary. The series is part of the Macmillan Life Skills campaign, offering free resources for English language students and teachers each month. As part of the series, we’ll bring more useful content and tips from the Macmillan Dictionary on expressing yourself. This week’s language tip helps with ways of warning someone: (Be) careful: the most usual and general way of warning someone: Be careful…
  • Enthusing about freedom of usage

    Stan Carey
    13 Oct 2014 | 2:00 am
    Writing about back-formation earlier this year, I said that enthuse – a verb back-formed from enthusiasm – occupied a grey area of acceptability. This area is worth mapping in more detail, since much of what people say about enthuse applies to other words and usages, and offers insights into what Macmillan Dictionary calls real grammar. Some people do not enthuse about enthuse, to say the least. Bryan Garner, in A Dictionary of Modern American Usage, says it is ‘avoided by writers and speakers who care about their language’. This is wishful thinking: Garner doesn’t like enthuse and…
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    The Mezzofanti Guild

  • It’s Time To De-Bullshitize What Language Immersion Means

    Donovan Nagel
    15 Oct 2014 | 6:56 am
    Okay… so ‘de-bullshitize’ isn’t really a word. I thought about using ‘clarify’ but it doesn’t have the same effect. I’ve talked quite a bit about how the words fluency and advanced are the most misunderstood and misused words by language learners and blogging “experts”. Well immersion is another one. Funnily enough, these words remind me of words like fascism in the media; they get thrown around so much these days that nobody has any idea what they mean anymore. “Just immerse yourself in the language.” “I’ve been…
  • Update From Nubia + Early Access To The Epic Arabic Language Project

    Donovan Nagel
    7 Oct 2014 | 7:43 am
    G’day! How’s your language learning going? I’ve finally arrived back in Cairo after an amazing journey down to Nubia in the far south of Egypt along the border of Sudan (hence the lack of updates the last few weeks!). I had originally hoped to go into Sudan as well but I’ve decided to postpone that for a later trip. Although I’ve stayed in Egypt several times over the last 12 years, this was actually the first chance I’ve had to venture down this close to the Sudanese border and I’m sure it won’t be the last. The hospitality and friendliness of…
  • 7 Questions You Have To Ask Before Buying A Language Product (#3 Is Vital)

    Donovan Nagel
    25 Sep 2014 | 6:08 am
    The challenge that most of us often face when buying books or resources to learn a foreign language is not that there isn’t enough available. The problem is that there’s so much out there that it can be tough to decide what’s good and what isn’t. And a lot of it is frankly rubbish. There’s actually very little innovation too when it comes to language learning products. Most of it’s a reinvention of the wheel so to speak; the same content or same approach packaged up and presented a little differently. This is why I’m always happy to endorse products…
  • How Arabic Words Made It Into The Chinese Language

    Donovan Nagel
    19 Sep 2014 | 12:21 am
    Today’s guest post comes from accomplished polyglot Judith Meyer. She runs a blog called LearnLangs and was also the organizer for the Polyglot Conference in Berlin this year. As I mentioned recently on Facebook, Judith’s running a fundraising campaign at the moment to get help putting together a really impressive tool for learning Mandarin Chinese called LearnYu (if you ever wanted a Duolingo-esque tool for Mandarin then this might be what you’re after). The campaign still has just under 2 weeks left and I’m sure she’d really appreciate your support. Click here…
  • 11 Unmistakable Characteristics Of A Damn Good Language Learner

    Donovan Nagel
    11 Sep 2014 | 7:27 am
    Note: I’ve got some big announcements coming soon which I’ll only be sharing initially with mailing subscribers. If you’re interested then select the language you’re learning, enter your email and click ‘Join’ above (most previous sign-ups need to be done again unfortunately). Thanks! What makes a person a damn good language learner? Why do they seem to do really well at picking up foreign languages while other people don’t? Here you’ll find 11 unmistakable characteristics that define a damn good language learner and which determine the…
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    The Everyday Language Learner

  • Dive Into The Deep End

    aarongmyers
    23 Sep 2014 | 10:40 am
    I recently received an email from a friend who was describing his feelings for his language learning journey in terms of a language swimming pool. When you take that initial step into the pool you are met with the shock of cold water.  Slowly, one step at a time, you move forward and the water inches its way up your body, past your waist and up your torso until only your head is above water. This in many ways reflects my own journey to learn Turkish and Spanish.  With those first steps, progress is quite tangible.  Like watching – and feeling – the cold water move up your body,…
  • Foreign to Familiar – Learning About Culture So You Can Learn The Language

    aarongmyers
    19 Jun 2014 | 7:00 am
    I just finished a great book that anyone planning on moving cross culturally should pick up and read. The book, Foreign to Familiar, is short (127 pages), incredibly helpful, and fun to read. The basic premiss of Foreign to Familiar is one we all intuitively know – cultures carry a shared set of values, beliefs, traditions and world views and each is different from your own.  Writing from a life time of experience living in different cultures in all areas of the world, and drawing from the vast academic writing that has been done on the topic, author Sarah Lanier, does a masterful job…
  • How Much Vocabulary Is Enough?

    aarongmyers
    12 Aug 2013 | 8:27 pm
    image credit Today’s guest post comes from Jeffery Nelson, the creator of a great new blog called Living Bilingual.  After you enjoy the article stop by and visit. ———- Language skills are hard to measure. There is an innate subjectivity in analyzing a language learner or speaker and their language skills. Languages are enormous, spanning literally an infinite number of sentences that can be produced from a set of words. In addition to that, you have the various meanings of words, sentences, how they are arranged, what tone is used, and literally thousands of other…
  • The Number One Rule For Learning A Foreign Language

    aarongmyers
    25 Jul 2013 | 1:06 pm
    image credit Today I am excited to share another great guest post from a regular EDLL reader, Arabic expert and language lover Saqib Hussain.  You can find out more about Saqib and about Arabic at  Arabic Studio.  For now, enjoy the post! ————- OK, so you’ve just finished you language course, you worked hard, memorised a ton of vocabulary, soldiered on through the listening, speaking and reading exercises, and you’re thinking to yourself, I’m actually getting the hang of this! Then… you go out and try to use your brand new, freshly acquired…
  • The Everyday Language Learner Interview Series: Jana Fadness

    aarongmyers
    3 Jul 2013 | 1:11 pm
    I have been an admirer of Jana Fadness for a number of years now and so was excited to be able to interview her a few weeks back.  Her blog, Adventures of the Directionally Challenged shares here experiences as a language learner, a traveler and a thinker. Jana has some great insight into the language learning process and her thoughts on learning as extroverts or introverts were especially important for me. Be sure and stop by and visit Jana’s blog after listening to the interview. Enjoy! Be sure and visit Jana at her blog, Adventures of the Directionally Challenged. You can also find…
 
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    EVS Translations Blog

  • Wormwood – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    20 Oct 2014 | 11:11 pm
    Wormwood origins from old German and is one of the first English words, first found extremely early where it is defined as “absinthium – wermod”. This was all the way back in 725. The spelling later changed to wormwood which was originally known as a way to get rid of fleas. Before 1500 it was […] The post Wormwood – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Pilates – Word of the day Trapattoni-esque – Word of the day Surfing – Word of the day
  • Hiragana – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    19 Oct 2014 | 11:31 pm
    Hiragana is the basic form of the Japanese writing system. It is a phonetic written script based on syllabic sounds. Each syllabic sound is constructed from one or two consonants followed by a vowel (with the exception of five sounds). The script begins as follows: a, i, u, e, o                         あ、い、う、え、お ka, ki, ku, ke, […] The post Hiragana – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Gerrymandering – Word of the day Kowtow – Word of the day Halloween – Word of the day
  • Artichoke – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    17 Oct 2014 | 12:17 am
    The artichoke was grown in England first in the garden of King Henry VIII in 1530 and was referred to in writing in the very next year in connection with the king.  In 1582, Hakluyt recalls how they were introduced  - “In time of memory things have been brought in that were not here before, […] The post Artichoke – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Achilles – Word of the day Cyclone – Word of the day Eavesdropping – Word of the day
  • Vegetable – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    15 Oct 2014 | 11:21 pm
    The first time the word vegetable appeared in English was in a very early translation of a mediaeval Latin poem which took a full eight years to finish. Troy Book was one of the first books written to showcase the English language. Its author John Lydgate (a contemporary of Chaucer and a major early writer […] The post Vegetable – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Tycoon – Word of the day Thanksgiving – Word of the day Smallpox – Word of the day
  • Submarine – Word of the day

    EVS Blog
    15 Oct 2014 | 12:47 am
    The word originates from the Latin - sub (below) and marine (sea). The first time it was used in English was in a book about natural history by Francis Bacon. Actually Francis Bacon is one of the most important introducers of new words in English - more about him in a later blog. Certainly his […] The post Submarine – Word of the day appeared first on EVS Translations Blog. Related posts: Silhouette – Word of the day Volkswagen – Word of the day Watt – Word of the day
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    Speaking Latino

  • Rodolfo el reno: Spanish Class Activities to Practice the Preterite and Imperfect

    Diana Caballero
    20 Oct 2014 | 11:57 am
    Spanish Class Activities with Rudolph, the Red-Nosed Reindeer Christmas song in Spanish (Rodolfo el reno). Students practice the preterite and imperfect. Read More >The post Rodolfo el reno: Spanish Class Activities to Practice the Preterite and Imperfect appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • 12 Días de Navidad: Spanish Class Activities to Practice Cardinal and Ordinal Numbers

    Diana Caballero
    20 Oct 2014 | 9:01 am
    Spanish Class Activities with The Twelve Days of Christmas in Spanish (12 días de Navidad). Students practice the cardinal and ordinal numbers. Read More >The post 12 Días de Navidad: Spanish Class Activities to Practice Cardinal and Ordinal Numbers appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • Ignore What People Say They Say: How to Speak Spanish Tip and Video

    Jared Romey
    6 Oct 2014 | 3:39 am
    Learn how to speak Spanish and achieve the Spanish pronunciation of a native with this pronunciation trick. Watch the video. Read More >The post Ignore What People Say They Say: How to Speak Spanish Tip and Video appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • 31 Games in Spanish: Language Learning or Entertainment

    Diana Caballero
    5 Oct 2014 | 5:32 am
    Four lists of games in Spanish. From games to learn Spanish to classic board games in Spanish. Watch some videos of how they are played. Read More >The post 31 Games in Spanish: Language Learning or Entertainment appeared first on Speaking Latino.
  • INFOGRAPHIC: 10 Mexican Spanish Swear Words and Phrases Not Taught in School

    Diana Caballero
    22 Sep 2014 | 5:58 am
    A list of Mexican Spanish swear words and phrases with English translations. Learn how Mexicans curse and share the infographic. Read More >The post INFOGRAPHIC: 10 Mexican Spanish Swear Words and Phrases Not Taught in School appeared first on Speaking Latino.
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    Blog at Fluent Language Tuition

  • Four Big Lessons from the Language Show in London

    Kerstin Hammes
    20 Oct 2014 | 3:49 am
    "Beautiful Russian woman" The Language Show is the UK's biggest and only language-focused trade show, held in London and attracting thousands of language lovers. So far I've been resisting the call of Europe's great Polyglot Conferences so far (more about those later) but for this one I made my way down to big London to see the latest trends, technologies and products out there in language learning. The Language Show is free to attend, runs over three days and features a huge amount of workshops, cultural performances and taster language lessons to try out. It's held at the London Olympia, an…
  • How Flashcards Helped Me Get Back To Language Learning

    Angel Armstead
    17 Oct 2014 | 1:29 am
    You guys might remember a recent post from Angel Armstead, our resident Japanese language and video game buff! Today, Angel is sharing a bit more about how she uses flashcards to get back into the action. Something as simple as flashcards have helped me get back on my way into language learning. I still have a very busy schedule. I'm working on creating my own coffee business. I want to complete a novel and I've decided to create my own video game. That doesn't even add in the miscellaneous stuff I do such as piano practice or other emergencies that steal time from me. I use these Kanji…
  • New Podcast: Episode 8 -- Lindsay and Kerstin Do Languages

    Kerstin Hammes
    14 Oct 2014 | 5:04 am
    In Episode 8, my guest is Lindsay Dow, a really enthusiastic and cool independent language teacher from the UK. Lindsay is well-known for her great Youtube videos about all aspects of language learning, and she was also a winner in the Sensational Fluent Giveaway. “No one learns a language because they want their life to stay the same.” The show doesn't follow the usual interview format, instead Lindsay came on as a co-host and talked about her favourite blogs and articles, as well as her own story of language learning. She also helped me select the Tip of the Week.Some of the highlights:…
  • Beautiful Gallery Images from my Multilingual Forest Surprise

    Kerstin Hammes
    8 Oct 2014 | 10:03 pm
    Sometimes we don't have to look very far at all to discover a multilingual gem right on our doorstep. On Sunday, I took a trip to Beacon Fell, a beautiful forest and hill in the Forest of Bowland, for an autumn walk. I love it when the leaves turn yellow and orange and the last of the sun wants our attention.The Forest is celebrating its 50th anniversary as an "Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty" this year (it really is beautiful), and they currently have a little art exhibition right in the forest to celebrate. I got a little lost looking for the first stone of Geraldine Pilgrim's…
  • Bookmark This! The 73 Best Language Blogs To Help You Learn Any Language

    Kerstin Hammes
    6 Oct 2014 | 4:15 am
    You may remember that back in July, Fluent hosted a rather sensational giveaway featuring prizes from Italki, Rosetta Stone and more friends of the Fluent blog. The giveaway was amazing, with more than 500 of you entering to win a prize! What you might not remember is that during the entry form I also asked you about your favourite language learning blogs. These blogs have now been counted and used to create the first ever Fluent list of awesome blogs to learn languages. Altogether, we counted over 250 votes so check out this great list of blogs and let me know which one is your favourite in…
 
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    Learn Spanish My Way

  • Baby Steps

    Keith Walters
    17 Oct 2014 | 2:11 pm
    When you first set out to learn Spanish, or any foreign language for that matter, it is important to take baby steps. After all, learning something well will take some time to do.I like the analogy of babies taking their first steps. It is much like many things we learn for the first time. We won't do it right when we start, but in time, it gets a little easier and a little better. Learning Spanish is no different!Many often ask me what are the first things to do in order to learn this language. The answer lies with you. What is your ultimate goal with the language? Why do you want to learn…
  • Help Me Help You

    Keith Walters
    3 Oct 2014 | 7:00 am
    ¡Hola!From time to time, I like to get your input as to what you would like to see in my blog pertaining to Spanish. What issues are you facing? What challenges you with the language?My desire is to bring you the best content when it comes to Spanish. I like to break down a common problem or issue or delve deep into a particular topic or grammar point. Sometimes, I showcase some interesting resources or knowledge about a thing, custom or place.I need your help! It's your turn to help me help you. Take a few minutes to respond to this super quick survey below. I promise to take your feedback…
  • Where Is the Help?

    Keith Walters
    15 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    The very last thing to discuss about when to use the subjunctive in Spanish is the indefinite and non-existent. When you use a sentence describing something or someone out there who may or may not exist, you would use the subjunctive. When you are speaking about something that may or may not happen or the end time frame is "up in the air," you would use the subjunctive. These are all unknown factors and because they are undetermined, you must use the subjunctive.Here are some examples:Necesitamos un horno que funcione consistentemente.We need an oven that works consistently.Quiero que mi…
  • Expressing the Impersonal

    Keith Walters
    1 Aug 2014 | 8:00 am
    Expressing impersonal desires or judgments in Spanish will always use the subjunctive "mood." But what are these impersonal expressions or statements?Well, these are statements that must have a specific subject. They will still have two verbs and two subjects. Instead of two specific subjects, only the second verb will have a clear subject. The first subject is general and very generic in nature. It takes the form of "it." The expressions follow this construction:It is + [an adjective] + that + [second subject] + [the desire or judgement].Es + [un adjectivo] + que + [subjecto…
  • Getting Emotional

    Keith Walters
    18 Jul 2014 | 1:50 pm
    Previously, I talked about wishes, desires, and dreams using the subjunctive "mood" in Spanish. If you haven't read that yet, please do so here.Describing emotions and feelings is another way to use the Spanish subjunctive. There are countless verbs out there to indicate any particular emotion you and others have. Some examples are temer (to fear or be afraid), esperar (to hope), alegrarse [de] (to be glad or happy), sentir (to be sorry, to regret), gustar (to like), enojar (to be angry), sorprender (to be surprised) and odiar (to hate). You can use impersonal emotional expressions too such…
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    Smoke & Croak

  • Registering a Glocal ccTLD – the Benefits & Challenges

    Liam Curley
    10 Oct 2014 | 7:06 am
    Website structure is a fundamental element of international SEO and online marketing. By structure, I’m talking about the top level domain used by your website (example.com, example.co.uk, example.de, etc.). I want to use this post to address some of the benefits, challenges and misconceptions that surround the registration and regulations. What is a ccTLD? A ccTLD is a country coded top level domain that corresponds to a country, territory or geographic location. So, for the UK we have .UK, in Germany it’s .DE. Why use a ccTLD? The main reason for using a ccTLD is if you’re targeting a…
  • Cultural Consideration in Landing Page Design

    Liam Curley
    4 Sep 2014 | 3:59 am
    The term ‘website localisation’ is often used interchangeably with ‘website translation’. However, whilst translating an existing piece of content from one language to another allows you to communicate with a new audience, you can’t expect that same web page to draw an identical response from two users with different cultural backgrounds. No two cultures are the same, and our personal experiences and biases influence the way that we receive any brand or content. An identical web page for an ecommerce site will not deliver identical conversion rates from users in Brazil and France if…
  • Offering Free Delivery to International Customers

    Liam Curley
    4 Aug 2014 | 6:39 am
    A great deal has been written regarding the expectations that e-consumers have regarding delivery charges. Free delivery options have been rolled out on mass by large online retailers and small retailers have followed suit in order to remain competitive. Research conducted (with US respondents) by ComScore in December 2011 showed that 36% of consumers wouldn’t consider purchasing an item if they were required to pay delivery and a further 42% actively seek out retailers offering free delivery. Further research found that after product price, shipping charges were the most important element…
  • Q&A – Managing Currencies in International E-commerce

    Liam Curley
    8 Jul 2014 | 4:45 am
    I recently caught up with Neil Seymour, managing director of Challenge Trophies (@SportsTrophies). During the past four years, Challenge Trophies have been expanding their e-commerce business into Europe and Neil agreed to offer some valuable insight into the challenges of managing multiple currencies on an e-commerce website. 1. Tell us a bit about you and Challenge Trophies Challenge Trophies was founded in 1976, a family business originally set up as a retail outlet selling trophies, medals and awards to the local community. As Challenge Trophies evolved, we worked with increasing numbers…
  • 3 Minute Read – Translating your Slogan?

    Liam Curley
    16 Jun 2014 | 2:06 am
    3 Key points addressed: When should you translate your tagline When you can avoid translation How to manage a slogan translation Why do you have a Tagline? The title refers to slogans, but I prefer the term tagline. We’re talking about the line of text below your logo, on your literature and website. Before deciding on whether to translate the tagline for new markets, ask yourself why you have the tagline. What purpose does it serve? There are two types of tagline: The Abstract – this represents and conveys the brand values through a memorable and simple message. Take McDonalds’; I’m…
 
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    Inbox Translation

  • Happy International Translation Day!

    Alina Cincan
    30 Sep 2014 | 3:44 am
    I cannot believe it’s been more than a month since my last post, but August and September have been two very busy months, so I hope I can be forgiven. However, I could not have let this day pass without a special post dedicated to the International Translation Day. There are so many things that […] The post Happy International Translation Day! appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • 3000+ Translation Glossaries – From Abbreviations to Zoology and Everything in Between

    Alina Cincan
    6 Aug 2014 | 2:44 am
    Glossaries are an invaluable tool for translators (and not only). Finding good glossaries is not always an easy task – it can be time-consuming and sometimes frustrating. I’m sure all of you have saved or bookmarked your favourite glossaries  as you discovered them (I know I always do!), but I’m also sure you wouldn’t mind […] The post 3000+ Translation Glossaries – From Abbreviations to Zoology and Everything in Between appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • How to Deal with Rejection as a Freelancer

    Alina Cincan
    28 Jul 2014 | 1:25 am
    As exciting as it may sound, freelancing (whatever the field) is not always the idyllic career that people believe it to be – it can be stressful and unpredictable, but it can also bring a lot of satisfactions. It is the former aspect I’m going to tackle today. Anybody who has promised you a glamorous […] The post How to Deal with Rejection as a Freelancer appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • Mind Your Language? No! Mind Other People’s Language: How Not to Behave When Living in a Foreign Country

    Alina Cincan
    20 Jun 2014 | 12:19 am
    Fasten your seatbelt, you’re going abroad! But hold on, they speak a FOREIGN language! What to do!? Well, let me tell you what NOT to. The following are some lessons on how not to behave in a foreign country. For this post, I asked some of my friends (who moved to foreign countries without having […] The post Mind Your Language? No! Mind Other People’s Language: How Not to Behave When Living in a Foreign Country appeared first on Inbox Translation.
  • ‘Love’ Rhymes with ‘Language’

    Alina Cincan
    2 Jun 2014 | 12:54 am
                You may be surprised, I know, To read this rhyming post today, And although I’m not a pro, I hope it will be OK. (So bear with me) When we saw the nomination In the bab.la competition, We almost needed resuscitation And thought we had an eye condition. (Pretty […] The post ‘Love’ Rhymes with ‘Language’ appeared first on Inbox Translation.
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